Porsche 911

Porsche 911

As if the 2015 Porsche 911 GT3 RS story wasn’t complicated enough, a new photo showing a possible scale model of the high-performance sports car just surfaced the Internet to pour more fuel on the fire. It may sound inappropriate for a brand-new vehicle to break cover via a scale model, which is supposed to hit specialized stores and showrooms after the car benefits from the necessary publicity, but it happened before.

For instance, the 2014 Mercedes-Benz S-Class made it onto the Web in the form of a 1:18 diecast model weeks before the German manufacturer staged its grand unveiling. Of course, that doesn’t mean the Porsche in the adjacent photo is the actual 911 GT3 RS, but we can’t help notice a few details we’re already familiar with.

Firstly, the scale model is clearly based on the latest iteration of the 911 GT3 . Secondly, the wheels are 100 percent similar to those seen in the GT3 RS spy shots we received earlier this year.

Puzzled yet? Well, buckle up because there’s more!

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

The Porsche Museum in Stuttgart, Germany holds many of the automaker’s treasures. The likes of which we won’t see any where in the world. One of them is Louise Piëch’s 911 Turbo , which was given to her as a birthday present. And the above video puts this car in the spotlight.

Who is Louise Piëch, and why is her 911 Turbo in the Museum?

First of all, Louise Piëch is the daughter of Porsche founder Ferdinand Porsche. She is also the mother of current Volkswagen chairman Ferdinand Piëch, making her a pretty big deal inside Porsche’s world.

So why is her 911 Turbo so special? It’s because that specific 911 Turbo is considered the very first example of the model.

It was produced in 1973, one year before Porsche officially released the 911 Turbo. The 911 Turbo has since become the crown jewel of a lineup that has no shortage of awesomeness.

This video is the story of the first 911 Turbo, a car that ironically didn’t have a Turbo badge because Piëch apparently didn’t want to draw any attention to it. She also didn’t like anything obstructing her natural view of the environment; so at her behest, Porsche didn’t add tint on the car’s windows.

One thing she didn’t mind about the 911 Turbo was the power, as its 3.0-liter engine packed a healthy 260 horsepower. On top of that, the first 911 Turbo has quite the reputation for being rather challenging to handle, thanks to the slow spool and instant-on power once the turbocharger gets moving.

The Speedster name has a long and illustrious history in the pantheon of Porsche . Since the 356 of the 1960s, the Speedster badge signified a gloriously fast, top-down driving experience that can’t be matched. With owners like Steve McQueen , the name carried weight and panache, but there are preciously few Speedster models in existence, as there very few models were made in each generation of Porsche. The 964 Speedster was only created for two years, 1989 and 1994 and less than 2000 were created between those two production runs.

With that signature, flat-six engine flooding the open cabin with noise, the driving experience of one these cars must be magical. The car was based on the new 964 Carrera 2 platform and boasted excellent driving dynamics.

There were few options or creature comforts available on the 964 Speedster, it had three pedals, and the air-cooled, 3.6-liter engine is naturally aspirated and high-revving.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1994 Porsche 964 Speedster.

Source: eBay

If there’s one thing the Martini brand is famous for, besides its wide range of vermouths, that would have to be sponsoring several Porsche race cars in the golden era of motorsport. The 917 , the 911 RSR, the 935 and the 936 are only a few of the cars that have won important racing events, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans , while wearing the distinctive dark/light blue and red livery.

The Porsche-Martini partnership ended rather abruptly in the late 1970s, but the two companies tied the knot once again in 2013, when a Martini-liveried 911 GT3 raced in the Porsche Mobil 1 Supercup. Now, with the 24 Hours of Le Mans right around the corner, a new Martini-striped vehicle is about to leave Stuttgart - the 911 Carrera S Martini Racing Edition.

Sure, it’s a bit disappointing that no Martini-liveried Porsche 919 Hybrid will hit the Le Mans track this year, but the 911 S Martini Racing Edition is more than just a pinstriped sports car . To begin with, it’s crafted by Porsche Exclusive , the customizing division responsible for a bevy of unique-looking Porsche products. Then there’s the extra amount of standard features that come with it, otherwise not available in the regular 911 S, and production numbers limited to just 80 units.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 Carrera S "Martini Racing Edition".

TOPCAR is no stranger to awesome kits for the Porsche 911 , along with other sports cars and supercars . Last year we saw the firm modify both the Carrera and the Carrera 4S with stylish body kits, and now the company has released its new Stinger GTR kit for the 991-generation 911 Turbo and Turbo S.

This TOPCAR kit is more than just your typical body kit, as these new components aren’t made from cheap ABS plastic or fiberglass. Nope, they are made from vacuum-formed carbon fiber and Kevlar. That’s right, these pieces are bulletproof... Okay, maybe they’re not bulletproof, but it sounds damn cool to say.

The reason this is such a big deal is because flowing carbon-fiber into the body of the Porsche 911 is rather tough, but vacuum forming allows TOPCAR to work within very tight tolerances to get the perfect fit. And by the looks of this and all TOPCAR kits, you are in for a treat when you see the finished product in person.

Like most TOPCAR offerings, there are no performance mods added in , meaning you get a 520- or 560-horsepower, twin-turbo flat-six from the 911 Turbo and Turbo S, respectively. If that’s not enough for you, I am certain the experts at TOPCAR will find a tuner kit that will make the engine as wild as the body.

Click past the jump to read more about the 991 Turbo and Turbo S Stinger GTR

Often regarded as the benchmark for every sports car , the Porsche 911 classic — built between 1963 and 1989 — is arguably one of the most popular vehicles among enthusiasts, which is why these iconic models continue to gain value in today’s vintage car market.

None of them are actually affordable to the average Joe, but certain models can fetch hundreds of thousand of dollars, if not beyond a full million in the case of Le Mans-winning racers such as the 917 or the 956/962 , and a couple of 1,000+ horsepower Can-Am machines. Another track-conquering Porsche found on every wealthy collector’s list is the RSR, a heavily modified 911 developed for Group 4 motorsport purposes in the mid-1970s.

Each of the 54 units produced in Stuttgart have their own spectacular stories to tell, but there’s one specific model that can top them all: the Carrera RSR previously owned by Giorgio Schon, son of renowned fashion designed Mila Schon. Acquired in 1974 for the World Manufacturers’ Championship and wrapped in one of the most intriguing liveries to hit the race tracks , this fast and nimble race car tackled the famed Monza 1000km, Giro d’Italia, Targa Florio and the Mugello Ronde Rallye events between 1974 and 1976.

Sold to Patrick Pierron of Monaco in 1976, the Giorgio Schon RSR took part in various track competitions, before being restored a repainted in its original lime green color in 2009. Now, following yet another restoration, the race car gained its historic 1974 Monza 1000 km livery back.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche RSR Mila Schon racer.

While the unveiling of the new 911 GT3 RS is being pushed back due to the faulty 3.8-liter engines that set a couple of regular GT3s ablaze earlier this year, a rumor coming all the way from Britain claims the next GT3 RS may get a turbocharged powerplant. According to Autocar, quoting an unnamed source familiar with the matter, the 911 GT3 fire debacle is the No. 1 reason for the turbocharging idea. According to the report, Porsche engineers are concerned about extracting more power from the naturally aspirated, 3.8-liter inline-six without compromising the unit’s reliability.

The problem with the GT3 RS is that it needs at least 500 horsepower to make it count alongside the regular GT3. Although some 25 to 30 ponies added to the GT3’s substantial 475-horsepower output don’t sound like much in theory, the 3.8-liter all-motor plant will have to cope with an immense amount of pressure. By contrast, a turbocharged engine deals more comfortably with moderate power increases.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

Source: AutoCar

There’s been a lot of talk about Porsche ’s purported plans to drop an electric motor into the 911 , but the Germans are doing a wonderful job at keeping all the details under wraps. In fact, Stuttgart is quieter than a Tesla Model S when it comes to 911 hybridization .

Fortunately, and because we’re living in an age dominated by state-of-the-art technology, Porsche’s steps are carefully monitored by high-performance photo lenses and recording devices. The Nurburgring track is packed with spies waiting to snap shots of the latest prototypes and test cars, so it’s only natural for us to hope for an alert paparazzo to blow the 911 hybrid’s cover.

And although we didn’t expect for that to happen anytime soon, it appears Porsche might be testing a hybrid 911 at the German track as we speak. Spotted earlier this month on the Nordschleife, the 911 shown in the video above looks like any other Carrera S you can buy nowadays. However, a device found on the back seat, as well as the high-pitched noise coming out during shifting accelerating, suggest this is no regular 911.

Of course, there’s no guarantee that the electrical equipment inside the sports car isn’t just a telemetry device, but the unusual noises are noticeable and they must mean something. One thing’s for sure though, if the 911 lapping the ’Ring with that gizmo attached to it is indeed a hybrid, development has barely commenced and there’s plenty of footage to follow.

As a quick reminder, we expect the 911 hybrid to carry a turbocharged, 560-horsepower flat-six engine and an electric motor sourced from the 918 Hybrid supercar , a combo that creates more than 700 ponies. And that’s an upsetting figure for both Ferrari and Lamborghini .

Yes, these are actually spy shots. It seems that the crew at Porsche is getting really smart about disguising its test mules. Thankfully, our shooters are just too eagle-eyed to be caught off guard.

What we appear to be looking at is the upcoming 911 GTS Coupe .

If you remember a few months ago, we actually had spy shots of a convertible doing winter testing that featured a lot of the same identifying features of this two-door. Now from the front, the car appears to be any normal 991-generation Carrera (or nearly any Porsche for that matter), but jump to the rear and things quickly get different.

First, take a good look at that exhaust. There is no Porsche 911 model on sale today with this large, center-mounted, dual-exit design. It actually looks more like the exhaust for the Golf R than a 911. This also leads us to believe that you should look for a more powerful version of the car’s flat-six engine to be hiding inside.

The second giveaway is more subtle, but a close eye will notice that the rear appears to be covered in some sort of weird tape or plastic. There is deformation around the taillamps and the center of the bumper. This is a good indicator of the GTS status, as the last GTS was released as part of the mid-cycle refresh. That tape could be hiding a slightly revised bumper and lighting assembly that will debut on the refreshed car.

Slightly better looking, and slightly faster. It sounds like a win to me.

Click past the jump to read more about Porsche 911 GTS Coupe.

There aren’t a lot of aftermarket companies that know the ins and outs of Porsche models quite like edo competition , so it’s only fitting that the German tuner has already lined up a new program for one of Stuttgart’s finest. In this particular instance, edo competition set its sights on a 2014 Porsche 911 Turbo . And as soon as work began, magic started happening.

The objective of this program wasn’t so much to reinvent the 911 Turbo as it was giving it a more distinct character that hits all the right notes with a customer’s desire for individuality with their cars. With this objective in mind, the builders set out and completely put its stamp on the Porsche sports car, outfitting it with a combination of exterior, interior, and performance modifications.

This is the kind of work that really brings out the best in the 911, not only because of the comprehensive upgrades given to it, but because it combines all of edo competition’s mastery of aftermarket Porsche programs with the standard of excellence the Porsche 911 has come to be known for.

Some tuners might consider a project like this as the crown jewel of its business, but for this German tuner, it’s all in a day’s work.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 Turbo S By Edo Competition.


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