Porsche 911

Porsche 911

In the wild-and-crazy world of the automotive enthusiast, there are all shapes, sizes and manners of ways to have fun. You can climb up a mountain at 3 mph in a modified Jeep , you can blast across the dessert at insane speeds in a Baja truck , or you can fling a small roadster like the Miata at your local autocross. Despite all of this, there is still one true “enthusiast” machine that stands above all; the sports coupe.

Two doors of sexy, fast, and exciting have long defined the term sports car . There have been many great coupes over the decades, but it seems to me that now is about the best time in our history to be a lover of the coupe .

To celebrate this pinnacle of fun and performance I have gathered together a quick list of what I think are five of the best sports coupes that exist today. As always, make sure you hit those comments when you get done reading. Let me know what I got right, what I got wrong, and what I was missing. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Continue reading to find about the 5 Best Sports Coupes

Liveries and sponsors are an important part of motorsport. No wonder certain models are best recognized when wearing the colors of Martini, Gulf Oil or even Coca Cola. Take Porsche for instance; the Germans have scored some of their most important racing wins while wrapped in Martini, Gulf and Rothmans liveries. The 911 , 935 , 936, 956 and the 962 are all related to these brands. But there’s a certain livery that’s often overlooked when it comes to Porsche. The white, red and blue of Brumos Racing , a team established by Peter Gregg in Florida, in 1971.

A race driver himself, Gregg took on the IMSA GT Championship with sponsorship from Brumos Porsche, a dealerships that had been importing rear-engined sports car into America since 1959. Granted, Brumos never reached the heights of the Gulf- and Rothmans-sponsored Porsches, but it did win the 24 Hours of Daytona four times. Its first success dates back to 1973, while the most recent win occurred in 2009. Brumos’ career also includes appearances in the Can-Am series with the incredibly fast 917. Although the company folded in 2013, its white cars adorned by red and blue stripes remained iconic figures among endurance racing aficionados.

To honor Brumos Porsche and its successful track record, the Germans launched a special-edition 911 Carrera GTS in 2012. Dubbed B59, it consisted of only five bespoke units that came in Carrara White with the famous Brumos stripe design. These sports cars also payed tribute to Hurley Haywood, who raced Porsches for around 20 years and played a big part in Brumos’ success. All five were delivered to the United States, where they found homes in collectors’ and Brumos enthusiasts’ garages. Some keep them alongside other Porsches, while others store them in garages that also include British vehicles and pure American muscle cars .

They all share a common passion that has been captured brilliantly in the video above. Hit the play button to meet the owners and the story behind Brumos and Hurley Haywood.

Porsche is intensely working on its upcoming 911 facelift, a statement backed by the numerous spy shots we’ve received in August 2014. We’ve already seen the regular Convertible model and the more exotic Targa , but now it’s time to have a look at the more powerful 911 Turbo. Much like its siblings, the Turbo also made a big step towards the assembly line, being spotted by our paparazzi in pre-production form. No longer just a mule, the 2016 Porsche 911 Turbo is finally showcasing its updated bodywork.

Naturally, it’s yet another case of "nothing to see here, move along." Of course, I’m overreacting, there is something to see, but, as history has taught us, 911s don’t change that much visually. That being said, our best look yet at the new 911 Turbo brings us what we’ve already seen on the regular 911, plus the turbo intakes, a rear spoiler and a different rear apron with quad exhaust tips. Familiar revisions include updated bumpers, reshaped door handles, a new engine cover, new LED taillights, and new parking lights, all seen on previous 911 test vehicles.

As with the rest of the lineup, the 911 Turbo will also carry the 992 denomination, with an official introduction to take place by the end of 2014.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 Turbo.

The BMW i8 is the first sports car to come from Munich in a very long time. But is the hybrid a true sports car ? According to its output and performance figures, as well as its 3,200-pound curb weight, it is. It’s actually lighter than the Porsche 911 , the benchmark of all sports cars, but how does this German machine stack against its Stuttgart-built rival in a straight line? Well, that’s what the folks over at Evo wanted to find out by pitting the i8 and the 911 Carrera S against each other on an airfield.

As we’ve previously mentioned, the i8 weighs in at around 3,200 pounds and benefits from 357 hybrid horses and 420 pound-feet of torque, which travel to all four wheels. The Porsche, on the other hand, sits better on the horsepower front with 430 ponies, but it has deficiency of 100 pound-feet of torque when compared to the Bimmer. It’s also slightly heavier and has a rear-wheel-drive configuration. Sounds like a close call, and indeed it is. The winner is only 0.3 seconds faster in the quarter-mile and 0.8 seconds quicker in the standing-kilometer run.

We won’t spoil the outcome, so you just head above and hit the play button for a full-throttle, straight-line comparison.

Within months since introducing its first update for the all-new Porsche Macan crossover , German tuning house TechArt rolled out the full details for the 991-generation 911 Turbo package. Previewed in January 2014, the 911 Turbo TechArt returns at full throttle with a significant output increase to go with the revised body kit and the upgraded interior.

As we’ve come to expect from TechArt, the modifications not only give the 911 a unique look, but also enhance its horsepower and torque figures, which results in faster acceleration times and higher top speeds. Both the coupe and the convertible can be updated using the new package, which is aimed at customers looking to park a bespoke 911 Turbo in their driveway.

All told, TechArt’s 911 Turbo delivers more horsepower than a stock Turbo S, which makes us wonder what kind of monster the Germans will unleash with its upcoming tuning program for the range-topping 911. But before we get ahead of ourselves, let’s have a look at the non-S Turbo they’ve just introduced.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 Turbo by TechArt

Porsche introduced the 911 Targa back in 1967, four years after the regular 911 went on sale. Unlike the coupe , the Targa came with a removable roof section, a full rollbar behind the seats, and a fixed rear window. The Targa name is a registered trademark of Porsche AG, but other manufacturers have used the concept as well, including Ferrari , Dodge , Bugatti or Chevrolet . Targa body styles continued to be offered with mostly each facelift or redesigned 911, although these versions were less popular than the coupes and the cabriolets. The 991 series received its Targa variant for the 2014 model year, two years since the revamped 911, this time using a brand-new platform, arrived in U.S. dealerships.

As we’re moving closer to the 2015 model year, the Germans are working on a revised version of the 911 Targa, which is set to arrive alongside the facelifted, 992 version of the current 911. The update brings many visual changes, as revealed by the latest spy shots we receive from our trusted paparazzi, but modifications are likely to occur under the skin as well.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 Targa Facelift.

Good morning, TopSpeeders; we’re serving up a hot helping of vulcanized donuts for your visual consumption. Today’s chef is Brian Scotto and his 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo do the cooking. This isn’t just a regular 911 Turbo, this Porsche has been worked over by the Japanese company Rauh-Welt Begriff. Scotto and RWB have done some serious modifications to the Porsche , not exclusive to that outlandish body kit. The car’s suspension sits an inch and a half lower, and it rides on 265/40 series tires up front and crazy-big 315/30 series tires out back. The rubber wraps wheels from Fifteen52 sized in 18-by-11 inches and 18-by-12 inches respectively.

Since the car was built just days before the 2011 SEMA show, Scotto and RWB initially left the engine and drivetrain alone. That meant the turbocharged, 3.3-liter, flat-six engine originally cranked out 315 horsepower at 5,750 rpm and 332 pound-feet of torque at 4,500 rpm. Those were pretty healthy stats for a car built over 20 years ago. However in recent times, the guys at BBI Autosport slapped on a new exhaust and engine management tuning to squeeze an estimated 440 horses from the rear-mounted engine.

The story behind this Porsche’s trip to SEMA circles around Scotto’s and co-operator and WRC driver Ken Block’s launching of the Hoonigan brand. The Porsche served as the point car and help differentiate Block as an independent driver not attached to Ford.

All that’s well and good, but donuts are more fun. So enjoy this heaping helping of tire-burning, smoke-billowing, hooning fun. And make sure not to miss the vintage Mr. Donuts reference in the video.

Our spy photographers have again caught Porsche testing the upcoming 911 Convertible , though this time things look a little more production-ready. As evidenced by the lack of major camouflaging, this test mule may actually be closer to a pre-production unit. What’s more, it’s painted a grey metallic color rather than Porsche’s always-black early test beds.

The lack of heavy camo and a lighter paint color affords us our best look yet at the new 911 . Reshaped door handles, a more throwback style on the engine cover, and the conformation of air ducts aft of the rear tires are the three biggest fresh updates. These changes join other reshapings we’ve already seen, including a new front bumper with its active air ducts, new parking lights, and new LED taillights.

Since this is likely a few steps away from being production ready, we wouldn’t be surprised to find the new Porsche parked at the LA Auto Show come November. In that case, the new 911 will likely be slotted for release in the 2016 model year.

Also unconfirmed but harder to prove is the theory Porsche will use turbocharging on all its Boxer engines across the board. This would help the German automaker reduce emissions and while still making appropriate power. Also likely is a smaller, six-cylinder, turbo engine for the 911, along with a four-cylinder turbo for the Boxster and Cayman cars coming in the near future.

Lastly, rumors suggest Porsche will codename this 2016 911 the 992 rather than 991.2, as previously thought by some. Rumors are rumors though, so we’ll have to wait for Porsche to make an official move before we know anything solid.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 Convertible

I, for one, am proud of every single owner of a great, unique or exotic car who drives them regularly. These cars are special, and they get people interested in automobiles. It is also a special experience to see something so cool and rare in the car world go rolling down the street. Sadly, as there are other cars on the road, there can be damage to these nearly priceless pieces of automotive history. Case in point is Jerry Seinfeld and his 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR .

Jerry is an avid car collector and Porsche enthusiast, but last week he sat and witnessed someone back into his pristine 911 RSR that was parked on the street. In a recent story in the Page Six section of the NY Post, Jerry recounts the entire terrifying, metal-crunching moment. He was sitting on a bench directly across the street from his parked car enjoying some coffee and the company of friend Nacho Figueras when the incident occurred. An older woman in a white BMW went to parallel park in the sport directly in front of the historic 911, but proceeded to back directly into the Porsche.

What followed was an obviously heated argument that ended with the woman fleeing the scene without providing any information for Jerry to use for insurance.

Thankfully, the car doesn’t seem to be destroyed, rather just mangled slightly, and I am sure Jerry will have it repaired and back on the road soon. Still, for a car that is only one of 49 in the world, it can be quit disheartening to see it meet the rear bumper of another car.

You can read the full account given by Jerry Seinfeld on the Page Six site linkedbelow.

Don’t let this stop you from driving these things, Jerry. We still love to see them, even if they get a little banged up from time to time.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR

Source: Page Six

Have you ever wondered what a "winner-stays-on" drag race among the fastest supercars in the world would look like? I’ve been asking the same question too. Then this video created by the SCD TV showed up and well, I finally had a small sample of the answer I was looking for. SCD TV staged a series of drag races featuring some of the world’s finest exotics to find out which among them is the quickest to a quarter mile. The rules were pretty simple: two cars line up and race and the winner moves on and faces another challenger until somebody defeats the incumbent. The process repeats until a winner is eventually crowned. Sounds pretty simple, right?

SCD TV made even more interesting by fielding some pretty gnarly exotics, including a Ford GT 720 Mirage , a Ferrari F40 , a 9ff-tuned Porsche 911 , a McLaren 12C , a Lamborghini Aventador , and a McLaren P1 .

What’s important is I saw what I’ve been wanting to see for a long time and that’s more than enough for me.

Maybe next time we all get to see more supercars in this battle. Just a thought.


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