Porsche GT3

Porsche GT3

  There is always one version of the factory built Porsche 911 that stands head and shoulders above the rest of its backwards engineered brethren. The 911 GT3 is the choice of seasoned racers with a high revving naturally aspirated flat six and a track tuned suspension. The GT3 offers true race car performance in a street vehicle.

Rumored to break cover at the Paris Motor Show in October 2014, the new Porsche 911 GT3 RS is still somewhat of a mystery. Sure, we’ve seen it stretching its legs on the road and track in several spy shots and video footage, but very we know few details besides its exterior appearance. The GT3 RS’ big conundrum is what lurks under the rear bonnet. Is the mother of all GT3’s going turbo? The rear fenders obviously back this scenario, but why isn’t Porsche saying anything? Guess we’ll find out soon enough. Meanwhile, word on the street has it the upcoming GT3 RS is the second-fastest Porsche ever to lap the Nurburgring track after the 918 Spyder .

Yes, folks, the redesigned GT3 RS is quicker than the mighty GT2 RS , a sports car we’ve been missing ever since the Germans discontinued it in 2012. According to Zero2Turbo, the GT3 RS lapped the "Green Hell" in only 7 minutes 20 seconds, making it four seconds faster than the 911 GT2 RS that established its incredible 7-minute 24-second benchmark on the ’Ring in 2010. This claim isn’t official, so make sure you keep them salt shakers within reach, but it’s a lap time that’s realistic for a turbocharged GT3 RS.

For the record, the benchmark would make the RS-badged sports car quicker than supercars like the Maserati MC12 , Pagani Zonda F Clubsport and the Koenigsegg CCX . Impressive doesn’t even begin to describe it.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

Source: Zero 2 Turbo
Posted on by Simona  

The Porsche 911 started its run back in 1963 - and oh what a run it is -, but it wasn’t until 1999 that a GT3 version was offered up for our ravenous consumption. It came to complete the series of performance vehicles that started back in 1973 with the 911 RS, a model that was capable of sprinting from 0 to 60 mph in 5.5 seconds and to 100 mph in 13 seconds. Why the short history lesson? Well, the new generation GT3 has just made its world debut at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show and would be nice to make a comparison between the things that were and the things to come.

The new GT3 is lighter and more powerful than the model it replaces, and it brings innovative features like the first active rear wheel steering in a production Porsche. There is a bad news too unfortunately: the new GT3 will only be offered with a PDK transmission - at least for now!

Updated 09/16/2014: Porsche unveiled a new video showing the new 911 GT3 in action on the track. Enjoy!

Hit the jump to read more about the next generation Porsche GT3.

Sometimes you just need a manual transmission to row. That’s how our friend Chris Harris feels before he hops in two of the last manual-transmission track cars still around, the older 997 Porsche GT3 RS and the famed 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 .

A rain-soaked racetrack nestled in the rolling English countryside provides the playground, and despite the standing water, the two cars stay planted on the tarmac. Sure, Harris has plenty of sideways action, but it seems nothing was unplanned.

The point of this little track test, according to Harris, isn’t to compare the Z/28 and GT3 RS side-by-side, but to just have fun rowing gears in a proper sports car — something our host isn’t used to saying in regards to a Camaro . Nevertheless, the Z/28’s engine with its high-tech internals and 7,000-rpm redline, provides plenty of fun. Its 305-series tires provide enough grip around the wet track to keep the 3,800-pound car from sliding into the wall.

Manual transmission-equipped sports cars are becoming less and less popular, as the performance numbers provided by these new flap-paddle gearboxes outdo those of the manual and as fewer people know how to drive stick. While it’s probable most folks looking to buy a hyped-up sports car know how to do the three-pedal dance, it’s undeniable that dual-clutch automatics are faster around a track.

But that begs the question; is speed everything, or is the connection and experience with the car worth more? Let us know what you think in the comments.

Sabine Schmitz is a name you might recognize; she is a professional driver who is referred to by many as the “Queen of the ‘Ring.” She was one of the first head drivers of the Nurburgring taxi service, and if you have ever watched Top Gear, she is the excitable young German lady that took a Ford Transit van around the Green Hell in Series 6. She also hosts German automotive television show, D Motor. To say she knows cars is quite an understatement, and that is what makes this video so interesting. Sabine owns a 997-generation 911 GT3 that she has driven for more than 12,000 miles on the Nurburgring alone, and she is set to compare it to the all-new 991-generation 911 GT3 . You know, the one that Porsche stopped selling because it caught on fire.

With Sabine’s intimate knowledge of the older GT3, it is really interesting to hear her take on the new car. She has the ability to really pick out the subtle things that make each car feel and perform differently. Now this is only a short performance test and drive time on a closed airfield, not a blast down the Nordschliefe, so Sabine can only say so much about the way the car drives, but she still seems impressed.

Click play to watch Sabine beat on both her personal 911, the new 911 , and as a bonus you get to hear lots of angry Porsche flat-six wail as she drags both cars screaming to their redlines. It a glorious thing, so turn that volume up.

In the wild-and-crazy world of the automotive enthusiast, there are all shapes, sizes and manners of ways to have fun. You can climb up a mountain at 3 mph in a modified Jeep , you can blast across the dessert at insane speeds in a Baja truck , or you can fling a small roadster like the Miata at your local autocross. Despite all of this, there is still one true “enthusiast” machine that stands above all; the sports coupe.

Two doors of sexy, fast, and exciting have long defined the term sports car . There have been many great coupes over the decades, but it seems to me that now is about the best time in our history to be a lover of the coupe .

To celebrate this pinnacle of fun and performance I have gathered together a quick list of what I think are five of the best sports coupes that exist today. As always, make sure you hit those comments when you get done reading. Let me know what I got right, what I got wrong, and what I was missing. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Continue reading to find about the 5 Best Sports Coupes

It’s no secret that carbon fiber is one of the latest breakthrough materials that provides a high-strength, low-weight solution to nearly any problem. Today it is used in making body panels, support bracing, and even entire monocoque chassis. But now, companies are developing complete one-piece carbon-fiber wheels. Jay Leno takes a look at Carbon Revolution, a company that is on the brink of releasing its carbon-fiber wheels to the marketplace, including to an undisclosed OEM automaker. Yep, soon we’ll see a mainstream automaker release a vehicle rolling on a set of carbon-fiber wheels.

Brett Gass, Executive Director for Carbon Revolution stopped by Jay’s garage to show off the new wheels. Weighing in at roughly 15 pounds, the carbon-fiber wheels weigh an average of five pounds less than a set of lightweight aluminum wheels normally found of today’s sports cars. Gass also elaborates on how his wheel is certified by the German government to pass all safety and strength requirements.

To test the wheels, Jay, Gass, and a group of friends head out to Willow Springs Raceway in a 2008 Porsche 911 GT3 RS . Besides a sideways slip into the dirt by Jay, the carbon fiber-shod Porsche holds the road. The group of guys talk about how standard, lightweight aluminum wheels flex, while the carbon-fiber rims don’t. The premise seems a little far-fetched to me that a novice driver in a borrowed car can feel the aluminum wheels flex, though I don’t doubt the benefits of lighter wheels. Either way, it’s an interesting look at the future of wheel design and construction.

Posted on by Simona  

Now that Porsche has revealed the full line of specifications for the new generation 911 family, creative types are busying themselves with the different variations up the brand’s sleeve. We just revealed our thoughts on the next gen 911 Turbo and then we found PS-Garage’s take on the future GT3 RS .

The Porsche 911 GT3 RS is the perfect sports car for those looking for true racetrack performance in a street car. The RS version will be the next logical step after the new 911 GT3 is revealed sometime in 2013, and while the new standard GT3 will deliver somewhere in the neighborhood of 480 HP, the RS version will be working with about an 20 HP. Unlike other 911 models, the GT3 RS will be offered exclusively with Porsche’s new seven-speed manual gearbox.

The new GT3 RS will bring in some of the usual upgrades such as an improved suspension, better aerodynamics, and an extra-large carbon-fiber rear wing serving as a reminder of its racing connections.

Updated 07/31/2014: British magazine CARrevealed a series of patent photos that present the GT3 RS in all its glory. Check them out after the jump.

Looks like the engineers at Porsche are testing out the latest version of the mighty 911. This is likely the upcoming 2015 Porsche 911 GT3 RS . The test mule is sporting those signature 911 Turbo air intakes on the side fenders, the same wheels we saw on the 911 GTS RS scale model that leaked last month, and that massive rear wing.

Rumors suggest the 911 GT3 RS will have a turbocharged version of the 3.8-liter flat six-cylinder likely making just over 500 horsepower. A PDK transmission will also be a part of the GT3 RS, giving drivers lightning-fast shifts. With a 0-to-60-mph time estimated around three seconds and a top speed just under 200 mph, the RS version of the 911 GT3 will definitely be a superior performer.

This particular test mule is fitted with an internal roll cage and several layers of body cladding, the first designed to protect the occupants and the latter designed to preserve the new Porsche’s true identity. There’s no covering up that beautiful exhaust note, however. It bellows from the tailpipes with a fierceness as the PDK slams into the next gear.

Video evidence like this makes us look forward to hearing official words from Porsche on its upcoming model. Be sure to check out the short video above.

As if the 2015 Porsche 911 GT3 RS story wasn’t complicated enough, a new photo showing a possible scale model of the high-performance sports car just surfaced the Internet to pour more fuel on the fire. It may sound inappropriate for a brand-new vehicle to break cover via a scale model, which is supposed to hit specialized stores and showrooms after the car benefits from the necessary publicity, but it happened before.

For instance, the 2014 Mercedes-Benz S-Class made it onto the Web in the form of a 1:18 diecast model weeks before the German manufacturer staged its grand unveiling. Of course, that doesn’t mean the Porsche in the adjacent photo is the actual 911 GT3 RS, but we can’t help notice a few details we’re already familiar with.

Firstly, the scale model is clearly based on the latest iteration of the 911 GT3 . Secondly, the wheels are 100 percent similar to those seen in the GT3 RS spy shots we received earlier this year.

Puzzled yet? Well, buckle up because there’s more!

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

While the unveiling of the new 911 GT3 RS is being pushed back due to the faulty 3.8-liter engines that set a couple of regular GT3s ablaze earlier this year, a rumor coming all the way from Britain claims the next GT3 RS may get a turbocharged powerplant. According to Autocar, quoting an unnamed source familiar with the matter, the 911 GT3 fire debacle is the No. 1 reason for the turbocharging idea. According to the report, Porsche engineers are concerned about extracting more power from the naturally aspirated, 3.8-liter inline-six without compromising the unit’s reliability.

The problem with the GT3 RS is that it needs at least 500 horsepower to make it count alongside the regular GT3. Although some 25 to 30 ponies added to the GT3’s substantial 475-horsepower output don’t sound like much in theory, the 3.8-liter all-motor plant will have to cope with an immense amount of pressure. By contrast, a turbocharged engine deals more comfortably with moderate power increases.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

Source: AutoCar

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