Porsche

Porsche cars

Porsche was quite the busy bee in 2014. The brand-new Macan crossover was launched in the second quarter of the year, while a facelifted Cayenne surfaced a few months later. Additionally, Porsche is testing several updated sports cars , including the Boxster/Cayman duo, the 911 convertible and the upcoming GT3 RS . More recently, Porsche also brought the Cayenne GTS to the Nurburgring , signaling that its facelifted SUV lineup will soon include another member.

While the Germans unveiled the revamped Cayenne in July 2014, there was no word on the mid-level GTS and the range-topping Turbo S. The latter is still a well-guarded secret as of August 2014 — though we know we’ll get one at some point — but it seems development of the former is well underway with a prototype spotted trotting around the Nurburgring.

Details are slim as of this writing, but the video reveals Porsche has slapped a new set of bumpers on the GTS, along with the revised headlamps and taillights already seen on the 2015 Cayenne. A new exhaust system is present on the prototype as well, but the big news lies under the SUV’s hood. By the sound of it, the GTS is no longer motivated by the naturally aspirated, 4.8-liter V-8 that we all know and love. The Cayenne S has already ditched the large unit in favor of a twin-turbo, 3.6-liter V-6, and it appears the GTS did the same thing.

The unit delivers 420 horsepower and 406 pound-feet of torque in the Cayenne S, so it’s only natural to expect some extra oomph from the GTS-spec V-6. As usual, the SUV will include a tweaked suspension and interior upgrades.

Our spy photographers have again caught Porsche testing the upcoming 911 Convertible , though this time things look a little more production-ready. As evidenced by the lack of major camouflaging, this test mule may actually be closer to a pre-production unit. What’s more, it’s painted a grey metallic color rather than Porsche’s always-black early test beds.

The lack of heavy camo and a lighter paint color affords us our best look yet at the new 911 . Reshaped door handles, a more throwback style on the engine cover, and the conformation of air ducts aft of the rear tires are the three biggest fresh updates. These changes join other reshapings we’ve already seen, including a new front bumper with its active air ducts, new parking lights, and new LED taillights.

Since this is likely a few steps away from being production ready, we wouldn’t be surprised to find the new Porsche parked at the LA Auto Show come November. In that case, the new 911 will likely be slotted for release in the 2016 model year.

Also unconfirmed but harder to prove is the theory Porsche will use turbocharging on all its Boxer engines across the board. This would help the German automaker reduce emissions and while still making appropriate power. Also likely is a smaller, six-cylinder, turbo engine for the 911, along with a four-cylinder turbo for the Boxster and Cayman cars coming in the near future.

Lastly, rumors suggest Porsche will codename this 2016 911 the 992 rather than 991.2, as previously thought by some. Rumors are rumors though, so we’ll have to wait for Porsche to make an official move before we know anything solid.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 Convertible

I, for one, am proud of every single owner of a great, unique or exotic car who drives them regularly. These cars are special, and they get people interested in automobiles. It is also a special experience to see something so cool and rare in the car world go rolling down the street. Sadly, as there are other cars on the road, there can be damage to these nearly priceless pieces of automotive history. Case in point is Jerry Seinfeld and his 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR .

Jerry is an avid car collector and Porsche enthusiast, but last week he sat and witnessed someone back into his pristine 911 RSR that was parked on the street. In a recent story in the Page Six section of the NY Post, Jerry recounts the entire terrifying, metal-crunching moment. He was sitting on a bench directly across the street from his parked car enjoying some coffee and the company of friend Nacho Figueras when the incident occurred. An older woman in a white BMW went to parallel park in the sport directly in front of the historic 911, but proceeded to back directly into the Porsche.

What followed was an obviously heated argument that ended with the woman fleeing the scene without providing any information for Jerry to use for insurance.

Thankfully, the car doesn’t seem to be destroyed, rather just mangled slightly, and I am sure Jerry will have it repaired and back on the road soon. Still, for a car that is only one of 49 in the world, it can be quit disheartening to see it meet the rear bumper of another car.

You can read the full account given by Jerry Seinfeld on the Page Six site linkedbelow.

Don’t let this stop you from driving these things, Jerry. We still love to see them, even if they get a little banged up from time to time.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR

Source: Page Six

Some people see the infiltration of compact SUVs into the luxury realm as a bit of a waste. They are only marginally larger than hatchbacks , get worse fuel economy than most hatchbacks and simply aren’t as composed as most hot hatchbacks. But most people haven’t driven the BMW X4 and the all-new Porsche Macan ; specifically, the Macan S Diesel and the X4 xDrive30d.

Steve Sutcliffe had the opportunity to not only test out both SUVs, but he also got a chance to test them out back-to-back. What’s more, Steve refrained from doing the typical "how fast does it go" test. Though he did get into straight-line speed, he also tested out their light off-road capabilities, roominess and handling.

The BMW X4 xDrive30d carries with it 258 horses, 560 Nm (413 pound-feet) of torque, a 0-to-62-mph time of 5.8 seconds and a 234-km/h (145-mph) top speed. The Porsche Macan S Diesel carries 258 horsepower, 580 Nm (428 pound-feet) of torque, a 0-to-62-mph sprint of 6.3 seconds and a 230-km/h (142-mph) top speed. On paper, it appears as if the X4 will trot to an easy victory, but Sutcliffe goes beyond paper to see if the X4 can hold up in real life too.

Check out the video to see the results of the test.

Source: Autocar UK

The Porsche Macan probably doesn’t need any more aesthetic upgrades; it already looks like a born and bred Porsche , right down to the subtle styling hints attributed to its big brother, the Cayenne. But who am I to tell Porsche what it can and can’t do, especially when it comes to offering new personalization options for its new crossover ? The truth is, Porsche Exclusive’s new options for the Macan are added luxuries to the Macan. You don’t need it, but it’s nice to know that it’s being offered, you know, just in case you want to give your Macan a personalized touch.

Porsche Exclusive’s Sport Design package comes with a comprehensive list of upgrades, including lights and aero upgrades. New bi-xenon headlights are available, as are dark-colord LED rear lights, both of which are part of the Sport Design package. These lights come with the new Porsche Dynamic Light System (PDLS) and are matched with smoked LED rear taillights with their own dark red lenses.

A new front apron, side-sill panels, side blades, and a new lower rear bumper section are also being offered in case an owner wants a more dynamic-looking Macan. You can also opt to install a new set of 21-inch Sport Classic wheels that Porsche is offering in three color options and finish off your personalized Macan with a new sports exhaust system with modified silencers and a pair of stainless steel chrome-plated twin tailpipes.

Don’t worry. The Macan’s interior was also given its due attention. The Sport Design package features a new ’Limed Oak’ interior package that includes overlays to the decorative trim on the doors and instrument panel.

Click past the jump to read more about Porsche Macan.

Long before the 918 Spyder came to take over as Porsche’s range-topping supercar , the Stuttgart-based automaker had the Carrera GT . But the roadster built between 2004 and 2007 wasn’t the first road-legal supercar offered by the German automaker. The saga began as early as 1986, when the Porsche 959 was introduced.

Born as a Group B rally car in an era dominated by monstrous WRC machines, the 959 developed into a production car when FIA’s homologation regulations required at least 200 street-legat units to be built for a rally car to become a contender in the sport. Although it shared many of its internals and the rear-engine configuration with the 911, the 959 was offered with standard four-wheel-drive, becoming the first Porsche to carry such a configuration. Later on, Porsche used the technology to build its first all-wheel-drive 911.

Hailed as the most technologically advanced vehicle of the 1980s, the 959 boasts impressive performance figures. The range-topping 959 Sport model needs only 3.7 seconds to sprint from 0 to 62 mph and just 13 seconds to accelerate from naught to 124 mph. Its quarter-mile time stands at 11.9 seconds and reaches a top speed of 209 mph.

Although short-lived, the 959’s racing career was equally successful. A rally version went on to win the Paris-Dakar Rally in 1986, while a Le Mans-spec variant finished first in its class and seventh overall at the 24-hour event the same year. Sadly, the 959 never got to compete in the World Rally Championship, as the Group B class was abolished at the end of the 1986 season. Nevertheless, the 959 earned its place among the world’s greatest supercars and in the hearts of petrol-blooded enthusiasts, myself included.

Paying tribute to the 959 never gets old, which is why various publications and online magazines keep rolling out extensive articles and videos on the German masterpiece. The folks over at XCAR are the latest to join the ranks of those who worship the 959 by putting together the review-like, 10-minute video above.

In the world of high-end luxury sports sedans, Porsche is a relatively new player. While Porsche debuted a sedan concept in the 1980s the brand never created a sedan. The Panamera itself debuted in 2009 and it has quickly started to amass sales in the segment. After a recent facelift, Porsche has decided that it want’s to push the Panamera into new and exciting classes by offering the new E-Hybrid.

Based on the technology that was developed during the creation of the 918 supercar, the Panamera S E-Hybrid is a plug-in hybrid that promises unsurpassed fuel economy and emissions, while still providing the luxury and performance suggested by the crest on the hood.

I recently took delivery of such a machine and spent a week beating on it to see if it could live up to the hype. From fuel sipping highway cruises and battery run-down tests, to a trip up one of the most grueling road in the U.S.

What I learned was a bit more than surprising, but you’ll have to read on to figure out what I really think

Read more about the 2014 Porsche Panamera S E-Hyrbrid

Posted on by Simona  

Now that Porsche has revealed the full line of specifications for the new generation 911 family, creative types are busying themselves with the different variations up the brand’s sleeve. We just revealed our thoughts on the next gen 911 Turbo and then we found PS-Garage’s take on the future GT3 RS .

The Porsche 911 GT3 RS is the perfect sports car for those looking for true racetrack performance in a street car. The RS version will be the next logical step after the new 911 GT3 is revealed sometime in 2013, and while the new standard GT3 will deliver somewhere in the neighborhood of 480 HP, the RS version will be working with about an 20 HP. Unlike other 911 models, the GT3 RS will be offered exclusively with Porsche’s new seven-speed manual gearbox.

The new GT3 RS will bring in some of the usual upgrades such as an improved suspension, better aerodynamics, and an extra-large carbon-fiber rear wing serving as a reminder of its racing connections.

Updated 07/31/2014: British magazine CARrevealed a series of patent photos that present the GT3 RS in all its glory. Check them out after the jump.

U.S. Highway 129, cutting through the foothills of the Appalachian mountains, is a ribbon of tarmac that spans the gap from Tennesee to North Carolina. The section of the road that cuts through Deal’s Gap is known as the Tail of the Dragon, and it is regarded as one of the best driving roads in the world. With 318 turns in a span of only 11 miles, it is easy to see the appeal. Still, with so many sharp hairpin turns and sheer drop-offs on one side, the Dragon is not to be trifled with. Since 1995, nearly 40 people have lost their lives on this tiny strip of asphalt.

Despite being only an hour from my house, I have never tackled the Tail of the Dragon. Sitting in my driveway is one of the latest and most advanced toys from the house of Porsche, a 2014 Panamera S e-Hybrid . What better vehicle to tame the Dragon with than a plug-in hybrid that is over 16-feet long and costs more than my house? Best yet, I got news that a plug-in charging station had just been installed at the top of the mountain and nobody had used it yet.

I took it as a sign that I needed to be the first. I pointed the big Porsche south and went hunting for Dragons.

Read on to see how my first trip to U.S. 129 went.

Hey everyone, welcome to Episode 022 of the TopSpeed.com Podcast.
This week is a little weird, so let me start with an apology. I am traveling this week, and I have some pretty terrible internet. The result is that the first 10 minutes or so of the show is pretty laggy and hard to listen to. Thankfully we came up with an idea to fix it, and the show gets better. So, thanks for sticking with us, and sorry about the technical issues.

Once the show finally gets moving, we cover Weekly Wheels in which Mark discusses the Cadillac CTS and I talk about the Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid . Sadly, Justin had no new toys last week.

For news we covered a lot of topics from the new CTS-V and the Ford Mustang SVT on the Nurburgring , to special one-off versions of the BMW i8 and the new Polaris Slingshot. A Corvette powered Darth Vader helmet and the death of the VW Eos also make an appearance.

We make our way over to viewer questions and take a minute to discuss what cars we are most looking forward to next year, and we talk about how well our wives can drive. That part got a little strange…

We finish out the show with a trio of James Bond cars in Own, Drive, Burn.

We want to thank everyone who stuck with us through the live show, and I would like to apologize again for the issues at the start of the show. Normal service will resume next week.

Have a safe week, and a wonderful weekend everyone.


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