Porsche

Porsche cars

While the unveiling of the new 911 GT3 RS is being pushed back due to the faulty 3.8-liter engines that set a couple of regular GT3s ablaze earlier this year, a rumor coming all the way from Britain claims the next GT3 RS may get a turbocharged powerplant. According to Autocar, quoting an unnamed source familiar with the matter, the 911 GT3 fire debacle is the No. 1 reason for the turbocharging idea. According to the report, Porsche engineers are concerned about extracting more power from the naturally aspirated, 3.8-liter inline-six without compromising the unit’s reliability.

The problem with the GT3 RS is that it needs at least 500 horsepower to make it count alongside the regular GT3. Although some 25 to 30 ponies added to the GT3’s substantial 475-horsepower output don’t sound like much in theory, the 3.8-liter all-motor plant will have to cope with an immense amount of pressure. By contrast, a turbocharged engine deals more comfortably with moderate power increases.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

Source: AutoCar

There’s been a lot of talk about Porsche ’s purported plans to drop an electric motor into the 911 , but the Germans are doing a wonderful job at keeping all the details under wraps. In fact, Stuttgart is quieter than a Tesla Model S when it comes to 911 hybridization .

Fortunately, and because we’re living in an age dominated by state-of-the-art technology, Porsche’s steps are carefully monitored by high-performance photo lenses and recording devices. The Nurburgring track is packed with spies waiting to snap shots of the latest prototypes and test cars, so it’s only natural for us to hope for an alert paparazzo to blow the 911 hybrid’s cover.

And although we didn’t expect for that to happen anytime soon, it appears Porsche might be testing a hybrid 911 at the German track as we speak. Spotted earlier this month on the Nordschleife, the 911 shown in the video above looks like any other Carrera S you can buy nowadays. However, a device found on the back seat, as well as the high-pitched noise coming out during shifting accelerating, suggest this is no regular 911.

Of course, there’s no guarantee that the electrical equipment inside the sports car isn’t just a telemetry device, but the unusual noises are noticeable and they must mean something. One thing’s for sure though, if the 911 lapping the ’Ring with that gizmo attached to it is indeed a hybrid, development has barely commenced and there’s plenty of footage to follow.

As a quick reminder, we expect the 911 hybrid to carry a turbocharged, 560-horsepower flat-six engine and an electric motor sourced from the 918 Hybrid supercar , a combo that creates more than 700 ponies. And that’s an upsetting figure for both Ferrari and Lamborghini .

In the pure German tradition surrounding the company, Porsche -built sports cars and SUVs are synonymous with perfection. Or at least they were until a few months ago, when some fire-related issues affecting the 911 GT3 began staining the company’s reputation.

As it turns out, the Stuttgart-based company has a new problem to cope with, this time in regard to the newly launched 2015 Macan crossover . According to statement released by the automaker, approximately 2,500 models delivered since the Macan went on sale need checked for potential brake booster problems.

The manufacturer didn’t share too many details, but it appears that an in-house quality test revealed some brake boosters fitted in the Macan might have been damaged during the assembly process. If you’re not familiar with the device, a brake booster is a mechanism than multiplies the energy applied by the driver to the brake pedal. Despite the possible issue, Porsche claims the crossover’s braking function still "complies with legal requirements."

Additionally, Porsche says the affected Macans were "predominantly" delivered to customers located in Europe, which means U.S. customers have no reason to be concerned until further notice. Nevertheless, Porsche will contact all owners to have their vehicles checked for free. Porsche will replace defective brake boosters at no charge to the customers.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Porsche Macan.

If there is anything Porsche loves more than creating cars that are amazing to drive , its allowing people to pay unheard of amounts of money to personalize them. The Porsche Exclusive program is one of the many ways that you can order a unique vehicle that is perfectly suited to your tastes and personal style.

Porsche has seen fit to release a Porsche Exclusive modified Panamera Turbo S on Facebook. The collection of photos gives us a good look at what sort of customizations are possible, and Porsche was even kind enough to include a list of changes and exclusive options with every still image.

Overall the car is very menacing, very beautiful, and very desirable. Although we don’t have a price, you can be sure its expensive. A base Panamera Turbo S rings in at more than $180k.

I would suspect you could take home a shiny new Ferrari 458 for the asking price of this powerful machine.

That said, this machine does come equipped with one of the most powerful engines Porsche has ever created, and will it blister most 911s and Caymans around a race track.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche Panamera Turbo S in Jet Black Metallic by Porsche Exclusive.

Note: Porsche 550 rendered here.

The rumors about Porsche’s baby-Boxster roadster are swirling up again with new reports coming out of Germany. This time, the news suggests the new car will surface for the 2016 model year and sport two versions of a flat-four engine. Dubbed the 718, this rumored roadster will slot under the Boxster in terms of price, horsepower, and weight, while still offering plenty of go-fast performance for buyers looking to spend less than the Boxster’s $63,000 asking price.

The report from Focus pins the 718’s two four-cylinders as displacing 2.0- and 2.5-liters with horsepower outputs of 282 and 355, respectively. Porsche will combine these engines with a DSG gearbox and manual transmissions that will drive the rear wheels. The combination of a lighter, mid-mounted, four-cylinder engine and a lighter chassis means the 718 will surely be a hot performer.

Rumors also claim that Porsche engineers are using a modified Boxster platform with a reduction in mass coming from extensive uses of aluminum. It wouldn’t be surprising to see the new Roadster also use lots of carbon fiber, as the cost of CF production keeps falling and becomes more pervasive in the industry.

Though the official word isn’t out yet, experts say the car will cost roughly $53,000 — a solid $10K less than the base Boxster. That said, the 718’s upper trim level, which includes the 355-horsepower, 2.5-liter four-cylinder, will probably only undercut the Boxster by a few thousand. Either way, we appear to be getting a more pure drop-top from Stuttgart by 2016.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 718.

Source: Focus

Me and the other two buffoons from the TopSpeed Podcast had a bit of an argument the other day. We were discussing what we each think has been the greatest enthusiast car maker. What auto company seems to do whatever they can, regardless of common sense, decency or money to create cool cars that we want, especially in the last 20 years or so?

Why don’t you guys take a second to chime in? Drop us a comment about what you think the best enthusiast brand is, and tell us why. I am working on my answer, and I will share it with everyone very soon, but I want to know what you guys have to say about it. I also want to see how many of you guys get it so obviously wrong.

Is it going to be Porsche or maybe Ferrari ? What about Dacia ?

Also, before you go too far. No, I am not going to pick Lancia . Top Gear already did that, and I still kinda think they are wrong.

You have your assignment. Now hit those comments!

If you’re a regular listener to our TopSpeed Podcasts, you’re likely familiar with our affinity with high-tech halo cars and the benefits they bring to less expensive, more everyday cars by technology trickle-down. Well, it appears Porsche is planning to share a few of the 918 hybrid hyper car’s parts with an upcoming version of the 911 Turbo S, and the Panamera Turbo S.

Why add a hybrid system to a car as seamless as the 911? The benefits are numerous and often obvious, but sometimes can be more obscure. The easiest positive to recognize is more horsepower. Adding the 918’s 156-horsepower electric motor to the 911 Turbo S’ 560-horsepower flat six results in a possible 716-horsepower hybrid drivetrain. That would help the 911 run the ‘ring with the latest Lamborghinis and Ferraris out there.

On the more obscure side, adding a plug-in hybrid system would allow the 911 to drive within Europe’s future Zero-Emissions Zones where conventional engines are banned in congested urban environments. Switch to full-electric mode, and the car becomes legal to drive downtown.

What’s more, it shouldn’t be difficult for Porsche to tailor the e-Hybrid system for not just the 911 and Panamera, but for other vehicles in the future. It’s possible for the trickle-down to continue further into even more affordable vehicles like the Cayman and Boxster, but only after the development and hardware costs come down. This not only helps Porsche’s overall CAFE ratings, but helps boost horsepower ratings and performance standards as well.

It sounds like a win-win to us.

Click past the jump to read more about the current Porsche 911 Turbo S.

Source: MotorTrend

In all the years that Porsche has been around, it has created a handful of iconic models that, to this day, enthusiasts still revere suiting their legendary status. On the flip side, there are also some Porsche models that don’t get the same amount of love and admiration that they deserve. One model that belongs in the latter category is the 1970 Porsche 914-6 , a mid-engine, two-seat roadster that Volkswagen and Porsche collaboratively designed and built from 1969 to 1976 .

In its latest episode, Petrolicious ran a profile on the "forgotten" Porsche and Jack Griffin, one of the few men who own the 914-6.

It’s easy to overlook the 914-6 given the other models Porsche has developed that have gained more esteem. But there still lies an appeal for a sports car that not only performs like a Porsche, but looks unique enough for Porsche faithful to consider it an outcast model to all other Porsches built before and after its arrival.

For his part, Griffin has developed a certain affinity and attachment to his 914-6, largely because of the way others have ignored the model throughout the years. It’s still a Porsche, after all, and as far as this particular 914-6 is concerned, a powerful one at that.

The 914-6 was one of the fastest Porsches of its time, having later evolved into a race car when the 914-6 GT arrived in 1969.

Most people will name the 911 as the most iconic Porsche model of all time, and there’s no use arguing against that notion. But don’t forget models like the 914-6, which carved out a following of its own that, as Griffin proves, persists to this day.

Yes, these are actually spy shots. It seems that the crew at Porsche is getting really smart about disguising its test mules. Thankfully, our shooters are just too eagle-eyed to be caught off guard.

What we appear to be looking at is the upcoming 911 GTS Coupe .

If you remember a few months ago, we actually had spy shots of a convertible doing winter testing that featured a lot of the same identifying features of this two-door. Now from the front, the car appears to be any normal 991-generation Carrera (or nearly any Porsche for that matter), but jump to the rear and things quickly get different.

First, take a good look at that exhaust. There is no Porsche 911 model on sale today with this large, center-mounted, dual-exit design. It actually looks more like the exhaust for the Golf R than a 911. This also leads us to believe that you should look for a more powerful version of the car’s flat-six engine to be hiding inside.

The second giveaway is more subtle, but a close eye will notice that the rear appears to be covered in some sort of weird tape or plastic. There is deformation around the taillamps and the center of the bumper. This is a good indicator of the GTS status, as the last GTS was released as part of the mid-cycle refresh. That tape could be hiding a slightly revised bumper and lighting assembly that will debut on the refreshed car.

Slightly better looking, and slightly faster. It sounds like a win to me.

Click past the jump to read more about Porsche 911 GTS Coupe.

If you pay any attention to the TopSpeed Podcast , it will have become abundantly clear that we all like Porsches, and that the Cayman is top on our list for greatest driver’s cars. With the recent spy shots of the Porsche Cayman GT4 , we thought it was time we took a quick look at what makes the new potential Cayman special, and what it may mean for the rest of the Porsche family.

The birth of the Cayman was purely to fill a gap in Porsche’s lineup. It was an artificial car with artificial specifications. It had an engine, horsepower rating, top speed and price, that was exactly between the Boxster and the 911.

Thanks to its mid-engine design the Cayman has always felt like the better handling car, but Porsche refused to let it eclipse the power or performance of the 911. That seems until now, anyways. If the rumors about the GT4 Cayman are correct, it is positioned to be a better car than the base 911 Carrera , and potentially even the RWD Carrera S. If true, this could make the GT4 Cayman one of the best driver’s cars Porsche has ever created.

Read on to find out what makes the Porsche Cayman GT4 so special


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