Porsche

Porsche cars

If you’re a regular listener to our TopSpeed Podcasts, you’re likely familiar with our affinity with high-tech halo cars and the benefits they bring to less expensive, more everyday cars by technology trickle-down. Well, it appears Porsche is planning to share a few of the 918 hybrid hyper car’s parts with an upcoming version of the 911 Turbo S, and the Panamera Turbo S.

Why add a hybrid system to a car as seamless as the 911? The benefits are numerous and often obvious, but sometimes can be more obscure. The easiest positive to recognize is more horsepower. Adding the 918’s 156-horsepower electric motor to the 911 Turbo S’ 560-horsepower flat six results in a possible 716-horsepower hybrid drivetrain. That would help the 911 run the ‘ring with the latest Lamborghinis and Ferraris out there.

On the more obscure side, adding a plug-in hybrid system would allow the 911 to drive within Europe’s future Zero-Emissions Zones where conventional engines are banned in congested urban environments. Switch to full-electric mode, and the car becomes legal to drive downtown.

What’s more, it shouldn’t be difficult for Porsche to tailor the e-Hybrid system for not just the 911 and Panamera, but for other vehicles in the future. It’s possible for the trickle-down to continue further into even more affordable vehicles like the Cayman and Boxster, but only after the development and hardware costs come down. This not only helps Porsche’s overall CAFE ratings, but helps boost horsepower ratings and performance standards as well.

It sounds like a win-win to us.

Click past the jump to read more about the current Porsche 911 Turbo S.

Source: MotorTrend

In all the years that Porsche has been around, it has created a handful of iconic models that, to this day, enthusiasts still revere suiting their legendary status. On the flip side, there are also some Porsche models that don’t get the same amount of love and admiration that they deserve. One model that belongs in the latter category is the 1970 Porsche 914-6 , a mid-engine, two-seat roadster that Volkswagen and Porsche collaboratively designed and built from 1969 to 1976 .

In its latest episode, Petrolicious ran a profile on the "forgotten" Porsche and Jack Griffin, one of the few men who own the 914-6.

It’s easy to overlook the 914-6 given the other models Porsche has developed that have gained more esteem. But there still lies an appeal for a sports car that not only performs like a Porsche, but looks unique enough for Porsche faithful to consider it an outcast model to all other Porsches built before and after its arrival.

For his part, Griffin has developed a certain affinity and attachment to his 914-6, largely because of the way others have ignored the model throughout the years. It’s still a Porsche, after all, and as far as this particular 914-6 is concerned, a powerful one at that.

The 914-6 was one of the fastest Porsches of its time, having later evolved into a race car when the 914-6 GT arrived in 1969.

Most people will name the 911 as the most iconic Porsche model of all time, and there’s no use arguing against that notion. But don’t forget models like the 914-6, which carved out a following of its own that, as Griffin proves, persists to this day.

Yes, these are actually spy shots. It seems that the crew at Porsche is getting really smart about disguising its test mules. Thankfully, our shooters are just too eagle-eyed to be caught off guard.

What we appear to be looking at is the upcoming 911 GTS Coupe .

If you remember a few months ago, we actually had spy shots of a convertible doing winter testing that featured a lot of the same identifying features of this two-door. Now from the front, the car appears to be any normal 991-generation Carrera (or nearly any Porsche for that matter), but jump to the rear and things quickly get different.

First, take a good look at that exhaust. There is no Porsche 911 model on sale today with this large, center-mounted, dual-exit design. It actually looks more like the exhaust for the Golf R than a 911. This also leads us to believe that you should look for a more powerful version of the car’s flat-six engine to be hiding inside.

The second giveaway is more subtle, but a close eye will notice that the rear appears to be covered in some sort of weird tape or plastic. There is deformation around the taillamps and the center of the bumper. This is a good indicator of the GTS status, as the last GTS was released as part of the mid-cycle refresh. That tape could be hiding a slightly revised bumper and lighting assembly that will debut on the refreshed car.

Slightly better looking, and slightly faster. It sounds like a win to me.

Click past the jump to read more about Porsche 911 GTS Coupe.

If you pay any attention to the TopSpeed Podcast , it will have become abundantly clear that we all like Porsches, and that the Cayman is top on our list for greatest driver’s cars. With the recent spy shots of the Porsche Cayman GT4 , we thought it was time we took a quick look at what makes the new potential Cayman special, and what it may mean for the rest of the Porsche family.

The birth of the Cayman was purely to fill a gap in Porsche’s lineup. It was an artificial car with artificial specifications. It had an engine, horsepower rating, top speed and price, that was exactly between the Boxster and the 911.

Thanks to its mid-engine design the Cayman has always felt like the better handling car, but Porsche refused to let it eclipse the power or performance of the 911. That seems until now, anyways. If the rumors about the GT4 Cayman are correct, it is positioned to be a better car than the base 911 Carrera , and potentially even the RWD Carrera S. If true, this could make the GT4 Cayman one of the best driver’s cars Porsche has ever created.

Read on to find out what makes the Porsche Cayman GT4 so special

The age of customized and personalized vehicles is alive and strong. In fact, many manufacturers have taken this route to ensure a level of uniqueness for their customers. One such automaker is Porsche , and judging by how it spruced up this Boxster S in a sparkling in blue, you can tell that the German automaker’s Porsche Exclusive program is doing quite well on its own.

There aren’t a lot of wholesale changes made to this Boxster S to make it look completely new. On the contrary, it’s full of subtle modifications that all add up to an incredible visual treat, the kind that customers will definitely want to get their hands on.

The Porsche Exclusive options fitted into this sports roadster includes a the new Riviera Blue paint job that is nicely complemented by doses of black on the exterior mirrors, the headlight cleaning system covers, the rear side air intake grilles, the "Boxster S" graphics on the doors. All these new trimmings were specifically modified to give a smooth blue-and-black look to the Boxster S, and yes, they do bring out a new level of sporty aggression to the baby Porsche, don’t they?

There is a handful of other upgrades to this particular Boxster S, details of which you can check out after the jump.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche Boxster S in Riviera Blue by Porsche Exclusive.

While the three Type 64 cars ultimately were little more than an engineering exercise, it provided Porsche with the knowledge it needed to create the Type 356 . The body shape was an extension of what Porsche began with the Type 64, and the teardrop shape still looks attractive to this day.

The birth of the Type 356 was not an easy one. With World War II raging, and Allied forces carpet bombing large portions of Germany, Porsche packed up and escaped to Austria. Porsche set up shop in an old sawmill in Gmund, Austria which is why the car carries its odd title.

Despite having packed up and moved to a sawmill, the 356 was still built using some of the most advanced materials and engineering possible. The bodies were all hand-hammered from sheet aluminum, and the chassis was a very stiff pressed-steel unit that was formed into a single unit with the floor. You could almost think of it as an early monocoque.

Beyond the futuristic production, the 356 featured full-independent suspension in all four corners. With that suspension setup and its lightweight, the Gmund Coupes were natural-born racers.

The car you see here is 356/2-017. It is number 17 to be produced and one of the oldest known living examples. While in Gmund, Porsche only managed to create a total of 50 to 52 Gmund Coupes (numbers are unreliable as to exact production). After those first 50, or so, cars were produced, Porsche returned to Stuttgart, ending the production of “Gmund” 356 models. Porsche still continued to make the 356 after it returned to Stuttgart and eventually produced around 76,000 of the cars in total.

Another Thursday afternoon means another TopSpeed.com Podcast . You can click play here for audio, or look after the jump for a FULL video podcast.

This week sees the return of Justin after his vacation, lots of cars with manual transmissions and a few automotive farewells.

Our weekly wheels for this week include the Honda Accord Touring from Justin and the Chevrolet Silverado High Country from Mark. I am a sad boy this week and have no new cars to talk about. Cue the sad trombone.

To make myself feel better, we cover a whole host of bad-ass car news. We start with the announcement of a manual transmission for the F-Type . We move to more fun cars with the Cayman GT4 spy shots , and the final edition of the Cadillac CTS-V . Cadillac gets some more love with the ELR-V and we finish with the BMW i8, the future of the M1 and round things out with a special edition Audi R8 .

We wrap up the show with a trio of questions from you, our wonderful listeners, and an Own, Drive, Burn made entirely of Corvettes.

We had one final viewer question, but it was a long one, so we decided to tackle it as a special "after-show bonus" so feel free to stick around after the closing music to catch that. We discuss what you should buy if you are sitting on $30k and want a performance car.

As always, you can catch us on iTunes ( we would love it if you rated and gave us a review), drop us an email at Podcast@TopSpeed.com, find us on Twitter @TopSpeedPodcast or just hit up the comments. We read and respond to basically everything, so if you have feedback, let us know.

Click "play" to hear this week’s Podcast

See you next week-

Hosts: Christian Moe, Justin Cupler, Mark McNabb
Weekly Wheels: Honda Accord, Chevy Silverado

The Porsche Cayman topic is hotter than ever with a new, range-topping GTS model getting ready to hit dealerships and an even more powerful GT4 version under development. Still shrouded in mystery, the latter has been been spotted earlier this week wearing its 911 GT3 -like rear wing and lower stance.

If the batch of spy shots sent to us by our skilled photographers weren’t enough to quench your Cayman GT4 thirst, then this new video that surfaced the web should provide you a lot more joy. Unfortunately, the sound isn’t too revealing in regard to what engine might be lying at the rear and the sports car was taking a leisurely stroll rather than attacking the Ring.

Details aren’t likely to arrive anytime soon, but word has it the GT4 will benefit from up to 400 horsepower. Word has it the oomph may come from a hybrid powertrain that will include either an updated 3.4-liter inline-six or a four-cylinder unit.

If the rumor proves to be true, Porsche will finally deliver a true mid-engine sports car that will step into 911 territory as far as performance is concerned. No need to worry though, the 911 won’t be rendered useless, as the iconic vehicle is also set to receive a hybrid version that will have more than 700 horsepower at its disposal.

This is starting to make us wonder if there is something in the mix for the Boxster too — the Cayman’s topless sibling.

One of the most notable and memorable of the early Porsche cars is the Speedster . This car actually came into existence at the insistence of U.S. distributor Max Hoffman. He was able to convince Ferdinand Porsche that there was a market for a “stripper” car. A stripper is essentially a barebones Roadster that could be easily converted into a racing specification car without too much trouble. The low level of standard equipment also kept prices low, leaving you more budget for race gear and modifications.

This particular Black Speedster here carries a particularly special heritage. It was owned by none other than James Dean, twice. Dean bought the car to race in SCCA competition, but after a few years he sold it to a car collector named Bruce Meyers. Later in 1974 Dean bought the car back from Bruce. This particular model does not wear a Speedster badge as Dean had it removed from the car during his first ownership.

Porsche dropped the Speedster model from the 356 lineup in 1959 in favor of building the newer Convertible D cars. Only 3,122 of Speedsters were ever constructed.

When the cars first entered production there were powered by a 1.5-liter flat-four engine that produced 64 horsepower. Before the production ended, you could order a race-ready Carrera spec model with 128 horsepower. With the proper gearing in the transmission, a Speedster could reach speeds of over 125 mph, making it one of the fastest cars of the era.

Dean’s car here was a mid-range “Super” model that managed 88 horsepower from its 1.6-liter engine. The car is still in Dean’s family under the ownership of his son, Chad.

We all knew that this would happen eventually. The only question was when it was going to go down. Six months after Paul Walker and Roger Rodas lost their lives in a car crash involving the latter’s Porsche Carrera GT , Rodas’ wife, Kristine Rodas, has filed a lawsuit against Porsche claiming that the design of the rare supercar contributed to the high-speed accident that caused the car to go up in flames.

In her lawsuit, Rodas argued that the Carrera GT was, for all intents and purposes, unsafe for its intended use "by reason of defects in its manufacture, design, testing, component and constituents." Rodas also contends that her husband was driving the car at only 55 mph at the time of the accident, contrary to the Los Angeles County Sheriff department’s investigation , which found the accident to have been caused by speed with investigators estimating that Roger Rodas was driving at speeds between 80 to 93 mph before the crash.

Shortly after the crash, Porsche even sent its engineers to investigate the Carrera GT’s remains only to find that the car itself had no problems.

It’ll be interesting to see whether Kristine Rodas’ lawsuit against Porsche has a leg to stand on. We are by no means trivializing the situation and we’re not going to disrespect her for taking this step. We just don’t see her winning this suit based on the results of the police’s investigation.

Maybe Porsche will just avoid the whole thing with an out-of-court settlement. We don’t know if she’s going to accept those terms, but at this point, you might have to take what you can get.

Click past the jump to read more about Paul Walker’s crash.

Source: Sky News

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