Porsche

Porsche cars

Traditionally, Porsche doesn’t release the 911 Speedster variant very often. With the last Speedster debuting at the 2010 Paris Motor Show (and selling out soon thereafter), it didn’t look like the Speedster would be coming back anytime soon. But late last year, rumors of a new 911 Speedster gained ground, specifically on how it would be packaged as a tribute to the classic 550 Spyder that Porsche built from 1953 to 1957. Now, it does look like the 911 Speedster is returning and will be built based on the current generation 911 and like its most recent predecessor, it will be a limited run model that will only be delivered to 550 lucky customers.

Whether Porsche is making the right move releasing a new 911 Speedster so close to the last one has become irrelevant at this point. Technology and innovation are moving at such a brisk pace that waiting decades for the new model to arrive doesn’t make sense anymore.

Add that to the popularity of the last one, and it only makes sense that with a new-generation 911 to build on, the return of the 911 Speedster is rightfully in the cards.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2016 Porsche 911 Speedster.

The fact that Porsche is busy working on a turbocharged, four-cylinder powerplant that will find its way in the Boxter and Cayman is no longer a rumor. The Stuttgart crew confirmed it last month, stating that the company is doing so in order to join the eco-friendly trend the automotive industry has embarked on in the 21st century.

Little is known about the new four-pot at the time of this writing, but word from Porsche CEO Matthias Mueller says that the new unit will pump about 395 horsepower into the aforementioned sports cars . At the same time, the official suggested that the said four-cylinder engine won’t be sourced from the 919 Hybrid race car .

More details are likely to surface later this year, but until then there’s an interesting spy video that we’d like to share with you. At first glance it’s "only" about a facelifted version of the Porsche 911 lapping the Nurburgring , but the trick is to pump up the volume and put your ears to good use.

What you hear might very well be the new four-cylinder engine everyone’s been talking about lately. It appears that Porsche is already testing it, albeit in a 911 . Don’t worry though, the Germans aren’t foolish enough to ruin their flagship sports car and take that brilliant flat-six away from it.

During a recent trip to a Miami-area Porsche dealership, TopSpeed founder Philippe Daix found himself face to face with five 911 GT3s as they patiently await an engine swap. Porsche is reportedly testing a revised version of the GT3’s 3.8-liter, flat-six engine, but until the engine is ready and shipped to dealers, these brand-new cars sit covered in a layer of dust, blocked by other vehicles within the bowels of the dealer’s service department.

Porsche made the unprecedented move in February of notifying owners to stop driving their GT3s and ordered dealers to stop selling them until repairs are made. The announcement came after two seemingly perfect GT3s burst into flames as they meandered down European roads earlier this year.

The German automaker’s investigation into the fires revealed two piston rod screws became loose, causing all sorts of mayhem and catastrophe within the engine block. Thankfully, no accidents or injuries resulted from the fires, but the incidents were enough for Porsche to recall all 785 of the 2014 911 GT3 s produces. Until the cars are fixed, current GT3 owners have replacement Porsche vehicles.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2014 Porsche 911 GT3.

With up to 560 horsepower pushing it from the back, the 2014 Porsche 911 Turbo is the kind of sports car you’re just dying to take for a spin around the Nurburgring. Opt for the Convertible , and you’re off to a great summer to say the least.

Although the latter is available in about 14 exterior colors, including the special GT Silver Metallic and Lime Gold Metallic hues that will relieve buyers of $3,140, we know for a fact that some customers are a bit more pretentious and need more than that. They need exclusivity, they’re after a 911 that’s like no other.

Our best advice to them is that they take it to Porsche Exclusive, Stuttgart’s in-house customizing team (similar to Rolls-Royce ’s Bespoke and BMW ’s Individual brands). Responsible for creating the stunning Lime Gold 911 Turbo a couple of months ago, Porsche Exclusive just rolled out another unique sports car , this time adding some bells and whistles to the Turbo Convertible.

As with most Porsche Exclusive models, no power-enhancing updates were operated under the hood, where the 3.8-liter, twin-turbo flat-six is just as it left the factory. No need to be disappointed though, this convertible has what it needs to stand out in a 911 crowd.

Click past the jump to read more about Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet by Porsche Exclusive.

You’re not seeing double – This is the second camo-covered 2015 Porsche 911 we’ve brought you today, though this one is the 911 Carrera S Cabriolet, instead of the 2016 911 Turbo . What this 911 does have is a reworked, more aggressive front fascia with more angular air inlets under the headlights. The turn signals appear to have the same design as the upcoming 911 Turbo S we caught testing, yet still similar to the current 911. And though it’s hard to tell from these new pictures, the previous set of spy shots show three bars lying horizontally across the inlets. Also very apparent on this test mule is the radar-based cruise control mounted in the center grille.

Out back, things look very similar to the 2015 911 Cabriolet we caught testing in January. Quad exhaust pipes protrude from the lower fascia, while what appears to be camouflage covers up the rear air extractors just aft of the rear wheels. The taillights are covered in the same transparent covering with the oval shapes to throw off any signs of reworked shapes underneath. Lastly, the engine bay louvers are hidden behind the same black metal mesh, protecting their appearance for a latter date.

Unlike in January, this test mule has its top down. The ragtop material is hidden nicely within the rear deck lid. Giving away its Carrera S status are the grey, 10-spoke, aluminum-faced wheels and round exhaust tips — providing Porsche keeps the same combinations currently found on the 2014 911.

It’s doubtful Porsche will change too much with the 911 Carrera S’ 3.8-liter powertrain. Naturally aspirated and making 400 horsepower and 440 pound-feet of torque, the current 911 Carrera S scoots to 62 mph in just 4.3 seconds. The possibility always exists for Porsche to increase the 3.8-liter’s outputs, however.

Click past the jump to read more about the facelift Porsche 911.

This isn’t an April fools joke, but Porsche already seems focused on the next iteration of the 911 Cabriolet, despite the refreshed version just hitting the market for 2014. What you see here is a 911 Turbo S Cabriolet dressed in very light camo as it rolls down a sleepy European road. And because the new car smell has yet dispersed from the 2014 911, we’d expect Porsche to hold off until 2016 for another refresh, at the earliest.

The noticeable changes include reshaped turn signals up front, new rear heat extractor just aft of the rear tires, reworked taillights, and possibly revised styling on the louvered rear deck lid as evidenced by the metal grates covering them.

Those front turn signals look quite similar to the one found on the 911 we spotted cold-weather testing earlier this year . The shape is just different enough from the current model to be new, yet it still holds that iconic 911 look. Around back seems to be the most heavily modified. It’s hard to tell from these shots, but it appears the heat extractor just behind the rear wheels have been reworked. Instead of the large grille of the current model, these seem to just be slats in the bumper. However, the slats could just be a clever camouflage of the vents underneath.

The taillights look revised as well. Just like the front turn signals, they are covered in a transparent film with oval shapes to break up any discernible pattern underneath. The way the taillights meet the bumper may also be revised since it’s covered in tape. Lastly, metal grates camouflage the louvers over the engine bay. It appears the louvers have been turned to face outward rather than rearward as before.

Click past the jump for more info on the spied 2016 Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet

There was lots of speculation surrounding the death of Paul Walker . Some said the Carrera GT may have had a mechanical failure, some thought maybe the driver was under the influence, some thought Walker survived the crash only to die in the resulting fire and others thought maybe this was all the result of a street race gone bad. Well, the investigators checking into the crash have released their findings and we found that none of these scenarios are true.

Plain and simple, it was pure speed that was the demise of Mr. Walker. According to the report, the Carrera GT — a notoriously difficult sports car to drive — was doing between 80 and 93 mph when it collided with the power pole, which meant they were traveling well in excess of the posted 45-mph speed limit — there was no evidence of a street race though. Walker broke his wrist and arm, and fractured his jaw, collarbone, pelvis, ribs and spine in the accident. Because Walker only had "scant soot" in his trachea, investigators believe it was not smoke or fire that killed Walker.

Both the Driver (Roger Rodas) and Walker were wearing their seat belts, and the airbags deployed as designed. Unfortunately, the Porsche was traveling way too fast when it impacted the pole for either to do any bit of good in saving their lives. The only mechanical issue on the car was the fact that the tires were nine years old, and the rubber may not have been in the greatest of condition for handling that type of speed.

At the very least, this closes up the Paul Walker case and affords us the chance to look at his impact in the world rather than focusing on what killed him.

RIP, Mr. Walker...

Click past the jump to read more about Paul Walker’s death and how it affected "Fast & Furious 7."

Source: CNN

The battle between Porsche’s RWD 911 Carrera S and AWD Carrera 4S is one of the enthusiast’s longest running matchups. Fans of the basic RWD configuration claim it delivers a more pure and raw driving experience, while fans of the 4S claim that AWD is necessary to help balance out the 911’s rear-engine placement.

EVO decided to take this argument to the physical space in an episode of its Track Battle series. In this video, we have a blue Carrera 4S lineup up against a yellow C2S , and they are going to try and decide which one is best.

I am not completely satisfied with the car selection as they are not speced quite the same. The RWD car has the PDK automatic and the enhanced suspension package, while the 4S gets the three-pedal option and the standard suspension. They both have ceramic brakes and the upgraded engine horsepower options.

I won’t spoil the ending for you, but there is plenty of drifting from both of the German machines. When you finish watching, sound of below about the conclusion. Did EVO get it right, or should the other car have won?

For my money, the Porsche 918 is one of the most exciting and important cars to be released in the last 25 years. Since it was introduced as a concept in Geneva in 2010, I have gobbled up every morsel of information and video of it in motion. The latest entry into my vault of Porsche knowledge is this video from the Nurburgring .

What we get to see is a track-side video showing a 918 wearing the Martini livery chasing after a new 991-generation 911 Turbo. It mates a 4.6-liter V-8 to a pair of electric motors for a combined power output of nearly 900 horsepower. The 991 Turbo is the latest in a long line of forced-induction 911s. the 2014 911 Turbo uses a 3.8-liter, flat-six engine that produces 560 horsepower, enough to launch the 911 to 60 mph from a standstill in 3.1 seconds.

As this is a standard test session there are very few cars on track, and aside from one slow moving BMW , the video is pure Porsche.

Of all the cars that have entered Jay Leno’s Garage , you can make a case that very few are as advanced technologically as the Porsche 918 Spyder . The hybrid supercar from Stuttgart recently paid a visit to the comedian’s auto lair and, as expected, Leno raised some serious hell with it.

But before he got a chance to take the 918 Spyder out on the road, Leno had a pretty interesting discussion with the 918’s Client Relations Manager, Daniel Eastman.

Among the many topics discussed by the two, some of the more pertinent highlights of the discussion centered on just how much of a technological marvel the 918 Spyder really is. Whether it’s the fact that it can hit 70-plus mpg or that it can still hit 900 horsepower, despite being that fuel efficient, the 918 Spyder is really the best of both worlds. It’s an achievement that flies in the face of those who believed you can’t achieve one without sacrificing the other.

The Porsche 918 Spyder is one of those cars that will be talked about decades from now; a true crowning moment for Porsche that will not be forgotten anytime soon.

And in case you’re wondering, Leno took the 918 Spyder for a drive with Eastman riding shotgun. Some guys are just blessed...


Back to top