Porsche

Porsche cars

It’s no mystery that Porsche has built some of the most fascinating sports and race cars the world has seen since the late 1940s. Some of these vehicles took years to develop and had numerous prototypes that preceded them. Some of them are already famous, while Porsche kept others under wraps until the 21st century. Now, after decades of silence, the Germans are revealing their full lineup of prototypes and concept cars in a new exhibit at the Porsche museum.

The exhibit goes by the name "Project: Secret!" and includes 14 projects Stuttgart engineers have worked on in the past. Test mules, prototypes, concept cars or plain design studies that helped the Germans develop and create the production cars we’re all familiar with.

You probably recall the front-engine 924 that Porsche offered from 1976 through 1998. But did you know Porsche also built a 924-based world-record car? The project came to an abrupt halt before being finished, but the vehicle still exists. Then there’s the 959 C29, an early prototype that helped Porsche engineers come up with the outstanding aerodynamic properties of the mighty 959.

Did Porsche’s first sedan , the Panamera, take you by surprise when it hit the road in 2009? Then you probably don’t know the company pondered the idea of a 911 -based sedan from the late 1980s. That’s how the 1991 Porsche 989 concept was born, a study that didn’t make it to production, but end up inspiring the design of the 996-generation 911. These are just a few of the previously unknown vehicle included in the "Project: Secret!" exhibit. Watch the videos for more intriguing prototypes the manufacturer has been hiding all these years.

One more video after the jump.

Established in 1975 in Fountain Valley, California, ANDIAL is more than just a tuning house. While the company may not be as famous as Gemballa or TechArt when it comes to beefed-up Porsches , ANDIAL is a big name in racing, helping the Germans win numerous events. Porsche scored six 24 Hours of Daytona victories, four Pikes Peak class titles, the IMSA GT and Supercar Series championships, as well as the SCCA World Challenge using ANDIAL-prepped engines, which says a lot about the California-based tuner. Now a part of Porsche Motorsport North America, who purchased the historic name in 2013, ANDIAL has also delivered some exciting road-going cars over the last two decades. One of them is the 911 3.8 C2S, which was launched in the late 1990s.

Based on the 993-generation 911, the last of the air-cooled 911s, the C2S is the best example of what ANDIAL was capable of back in the day. Don’t mind the lack of visual upgrades, this 911 is about enhanced performance, with all the tweaks operated under the shell. It’s a race car in disguise, one you simply can’t ignore if you’re into true blue sports cars .

Click past the jump to read more about the 1998 Porsche 911 Andial 3.8 C2S.

Source: eBay

Looks like Ferrari isn’t the only automaker that’s set to introduce a special-edition model that places emphasis on the U.S. market. German automaker Porsche has a plan to build an exclusive version of the Panamera later this year. Automobile is reporting that Porsche’s design arm, Porsche Exclusive, will be unveiling 100 units of a limited-edition Panamera , 30 of which are headed to the U.S.

Details are still sketchy on the extent of exclusivity this particular Panamera will have, but Automobile’s source indicates that the luxury saloon will feature a unique metallic-paint scheme, a multi-colored leather upholstery, and will feature just about every option imaginable.

It’s highly unlikely that the model will reach the $3.2 million price tag of the U.S.-bound, super-exclusive Ferrari, but you can at least expect the Panamera to come dressed to impress, maybe even have a little sparkle here and there.

The same report also suggests that Porsche Executive will use the top-of-the-line Panamera Turbo S Executive to develop this limited-edition model. In the event that happens, you can expect it to retail for a good bit more than the $201,495 (with destination) price tag of the standard Panamera Turbo S Executive.

Maybe somewhere in the vicinity of $250,000 to $300,000.

Porsche is expected to divulge more details about this mysterious Panamera in the coming weeks, at which point I expect to hear news that all 30 models have already sold out.

Click past the jump to read more about this future super-sedan from Porsche.

Rumored to break cover at the Paris Motor Show in October 2014, the new Porsche 911 GT3 RS is still somewhat of a mystery. Sure, we’ve seen it stretching its legs on the road and track in several spy shots and video footage, but very we know few details besides its exterior appearance. The GT3 RS’ big conundrum is what lurks under the rear bonnet. Is the mother of all GT3’s going turbo? The rear fenders obviously back this scenario, but why isn’t Porsche saying anything? Guess we’ll find out soon enough. Meanwhile, word on the street has it the upcoming GT3 RS is the second-fastest Porsche ever to lap the Nurburgring track after the 918 Spyder .

Yes, folks, the redesigned GT3 RS is quicker than the mighty GT2 RS , a sports car we’ve been missing ever since the Germans discontinued it in 2012. According to Zero2Turbo, the GT3 RS lapped the "Green Hell" in only 7 minutes 20 seconds, making it four seconds faster than the 911 GT2 RS that established its incredible 7-minute 24-second benchmark on the ’Ring in 2010. This claim isn’t official, so make sure you keep them salt shakers within reach, but it’s a lap time that’s realistic for a turbocharged GT3 RS.

For the record, the benchmark would make the RS-badged sports car quicker than supercars like the Maserati MC12 , Pagani Zonda F Clubsport and the Koenigsegg CCX . Impressive doesn’t even begin to describe it.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

Source: Zero 2 Turbo

Porsche Exclusive is running out of models to work on. That appears to be the case after Porsche’s design division released a new program for one of its models, namely the Cayenne .

The new program is the latest in a series of models that Porsche has been working on. Remember the Porsche Cayman from a few weeks ago? This time, the Cayenne gets treated to a comprehensive exterior and interior upgrade, highlighted by the Palladium Metallic exterior paint finish.

The color is not dramatic to the point that its style and character changes, but it is significant enough to provide a new look to the luxury SUV. If anything, the gold touches on the body and wheels of the Cayenne S bring out a fresh and regal visual appeal to the mighty Porsche SUV .

I admittedly don’t own a Cayenne, but if I did, this is the kind of look I want it to have. It’s classy and flashy at the same time. More importantly, it’s indicative of what Porsche Exclusive can do when you let it run around and work on any model it likes.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche Cayenne S Palladium Metallic By Porsche Exclusive.

Posted on by Simona  

The Porsche 911 started its run back in 1963 - and oh what a run it is -, but it wasn’t until 1999 that a GT3 version was offered up for our ravenous consumption. It came to complete the series of performance vehicles that started back in 1973 with the 911 RS, a model that was capable of sprinting from 0 to 60 mph in 5.5 seconds and to 100 mph in 13 seconds. Why the short history lesson? Well, the new generation GT3 has just made its world debut at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show and would be nice to make a comparison between the things that were and the things to come.

The new GT3 is lighter and more powerful than the model it replaces, and it brings innovative features like the first active rear wheel steering in a production Porsche. There is a bad news too unfortunately: the new GT3 will only be offered with a PDK transmission - at least for now!

Updated 09/16/2014: Porsche unveiled a new video showing the new 911 GT3 in action on the track. Enjoy!

Hit the jump to read more about the next generation Porsche GT3.

Sometimes you just need a manual transmission to row. That’s how our friend Chris Harris feels before he hops in two of the last manual-transmission track cars still around, the older 997 Porsche GT3 RS and the famed 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 .

A rain-soaked racetrack nestled in the rolling English countryside provides the playground, and despite the standing water, the two cars stay planted on the tarmac. Sure, Harris has plenty of sideways action, but it seems nothing was unplanned.

The point of this little track test, according to Harris, isn’t to compare the Z/28 and GT3 RS side-by-side, but to just have fun rowing gears in a proper sports car — something our host isn’t used to saying in regards to a Camaro . Nevertheless, the Z/28’s engine with its high-tech internals and 7,000-rpm redline, provides plenty of fun. Its 305-series tires provide enough grip around the wet track to keep the 3,800-pound car from sliding into the wall.

Manual transmission-equipped sports cars are becoming less and less popular, as the performance numbers provided by these new flap-paddle gearboxes outdo those of the manual and as fewer people know how to drive stick. While it’s probable most folks looking to buy a hyped-up sports car know how to do the three-pedal dance, it’s undeniable that dual-clutch automatics are faster around a track.

But that begs the question; is speed everything, or is the connection and experience with the car worth more? Let us know what you think in the comments.

We already know everything there is to know about the Porsche 918 Spyder and we all agree its Stuttgart’s finest piece of engineering yet. That’s why we can’t get enough of this V-8-powered hybrid and drool over any 918 Spyder-related footage we lay our eyes upon. This time around, there’s no test drive or quarter-mile race, but a 0-to-207 mph run that puts the German supercar within four mph of its claimed top speed. What’s really impressive is that the 918 Spyder takes only 29 seconds to charge to 207 mph from a standing start, yet another benchmark added to its staggering performance credentials, which include a 0-to-60-mph time of only 2.8 seconds.

As a brief reminder, Porsche’s latest supercar is powered by a 4.6-liter, V-8 engine connected to two electric motors. The combo cranks out 887 horsepower and an amazing 940 pound-feet of torque. This drivertrain may generate less horsepower than those fitted in the Ferrari LaFerrari and the McLaren P1 , but make no mistakes, the 918 Spyder is just as fast.

If you need further proof, Sport Auto’s video above is enough to showcase the 918’s capabilities when the hammer falls on the gas pedal.

Hit the play button to enjoy the speed and the roar of that incredible V-8 engine!

Sabine Schmitz is a name you might recognize; she is a professional driver who is referred to by many as the “Queen of the ‘Ring.” She was one of the first head drivers of the Nurburgring taxi service, and if you have ever watched Top Gear, she is the excitable young German lady that took a Ford Transit van around the Green Hell in Series 6. She also hosts German automotive television show, D Motor. To say she knows cars is quite an understatement, and that is what makes this video so interesting. Sabine owns a 997-generation 911 GT3 that she has driven for more than 12,000 miles on the Nurburgring alone, and she is set to compare it to the all-new 991-generation 911 GT3 . You know, the one that Porsche stopped selling because it caught on fire.

With Sabine’s intimate knowledge of the older GT3, it is really interesting to hear her take on the new car. She has the ability to really pick out the subtle things that make each car feel and perform differently. Now this is only a short performance test and drive time on a closed airfield, not a blast down the Nordschliefe, so Sabine can only say so much about the way the car drives, but she still seems impressed.

Click play to watch Sabine beat on both her personal 911, the new 911 , and as a bonus you get to hear lots of angry Porsche flat-six wail as she drags both cars screaming to their redlines. It a glorious thing, so turn that volume up.

It’s no secret that carbon fiber is one of the latest breakthrough materials that provides a high-strength, low-weight solution to nearly any problem. Today it is used in making body panels, support bracing, and even entire monocoque chassis. But now, companies are developing complete one-piece carbon-fiber wheels. Jay Leno takes a look at Carbon Revolution, a company that is on the brink of releasing its carbon-fiber wheels to the marketplace, including to an undisclosed OEM automaker. Yep, soon we’ll see a mainstream automaker release a vehicle rolling on a set of carbon-fiber wheels.

Brett Gass, Executive Director for Carbon Revolution stopped by Jay’s garage to show off the new wheels. Weighing in at roughly 15 pounds, the carbon-fiber wheels weigh an average of five pounds less than a set of lightweight aluminum wheels normally found of today’s sports cars. Gass also elaborates on how his wheel is certified by the German government to pass all safety and strength requirements.

To test the wheels, Jay, Gass, and a group of friends head out to Willow Springs Raceway in a 2008 Porsche 911 GT3 RS . Besides a sideways slip into the dirt by Jay, the carbon fiber-shod Porsche holds the road. The group of guys talk about how standard, lightweight aluminum wheels flex, while the carbon-fiber rims don’t. The premise seems a little far-fetched to me that a novice driver in a borrowed car can feel the aluminum wheels flex, though I don’t doubt the benefits of lighter wheels. Either way, it’s an interesting look at the future of wheel design and construction.


1 2 3 4 5 next >
Back to top