> 
race cars

race cars

  Race cars have all the safety equipment and power required to win races and protect their driver at the same time. Some of them are street legal but most of them are not


Last year, we showed you the GreenGT LMPH2 model that was invited to the 2012 24 Hours of Le Mans , but did not race. Now that Green GT has nearly mastered its art of alternative fuel usage, it is set to enter its newest invention, the GreenGT H2, to the 2013 running of the Le Mans endurance race.

This H2 is nothing short of an impressive piece of work, as it boasts a pair of three-phase electric motors that each produce 200 Kw of power, which equals out to 544 horsepower reaching the rear wheels. What’s even more impressive is the astounding 4,000 Nm (2,950 pound-feet) of torque these motors create – no, that’s not a typo, two-thousand nine-hundred and fifty pound-feet. Being this is fully electric, we assume that this massive torque amount is instantly available.

Now, in order to run an electric motor, you need batteries, right? Not so fast. You’re forgetting about the oft-left-out fuel cell technology. The H2 uses a hydrogen fuel cell to produce the electricity the motors require. The only emissions produced are in the form of water vapor and heat.

You may think that the GreenGT will run away from the competition with its 2,950 pound-feet of torque and 544 horsepower, but you have to remember that this technology is still in production. The GreenGT H2 can only run for a solid 40 minutes at a time before needing its composite tanks refilled with hydrogen.

We’re excited to see the GreenGT H2 in action and this is really our front runner as the eventual replacement for gasoline power in auto racing. It may even wind up in personal cars too.

There are three types of accidents in the world of car racing: expected, freak, and “how in the [insert favorite expletive] did that happen?” Well, an accident involving an AMG racecar, air line, and four Mercedes DTM crew members falls into the latter of those three categories.

This is a clear example of a pit crew simply not following the most basic of pit rules: clean your crap off of pit lane after you’re done and secure your air hose properly until you are ready to use it. After a fairly quick pit stop by the AMG coupe during practice at Zandvoort on Friday, the coupe speeds away. The crew directly in front of the car apparently left their air hose dangling over the track in anticipation of a pit stop of their own and the car’s rear spoiler caught the hose.

Well, the hose turns into a massive bull whip with a crack that would make Indiana Jones feel inadequate. As it whips around, it catches four crew members and drops three to the tarmac. Luckily, no one was seriously injured, as Mercedes has released a statement that three of the four were released from the hospital and are back on the job, but one remains in the hospital with serious, but not life threatening, injuries.

From the 1:10 mark to the 1:15 mark, you can see the accident in slow motion and you can really get a look at how lazily wrapped the air hose is. The hose that the Mercedes hit was hanging halfway down, whereas the rest of the hoses in pit lane are tightly wrapped and well above the top of the spoiler.

We’re sure this team is in for a quick and harsh lesson on pit-lane maintenance and organization. Then again, getting bull whipped by an air hose may be lesson enough.

Source: AutoSport

From the folks that gave us the SR3 SL comes another race car set to get your hearts pumping on the track. The new SR1 by Radical Motorsports is an entry level sports-prototype racing car aimed at the track-day driver and club racer. It is priced at a measly £29,850, or $37,800 at the current exchange rates.

The new SR1 was designed by the same guys responsible for the Radical’s SR9 LMP2 racecar, so it follows in the same design direction, but tweaked for current track regulations. It has been designed to be ideal for both the driver and the passenger.

Under the hood, the racing prototype gets an RPE-Suzuki four-cylinder engine that delivers a total of 210 HP and is mated to a six-speed sequential gearbox as standard. The SR1 can go up to a top speed of 138 mph and sprints from 0 to 60 mph in just 3.6 seconds.

UPDATE 08/23/2012: The Radical SR1 has begun testing at Bedford Autodrome, one of the locations for next year’s Radical SR1 Cup championship for novice drivers and trackday enthusiasts. Radical has marked this time in their history with a new video introducing all drivers to their new Radical SR1. Check it out by clicking on the image above.

Hit the jump to read more about the new Radical SR1.

In case you’re wondering where American ingenuity went, you can look no further than Slot Mods, the makers of hand-made, custom race tracks to find your answer.

Taking a 1969 Chevrolet Camaro dressed in the legendary deep blue Sunoco finish of Roger Penske’s old Trans-Am race car, Slot Mods went about and customized it to be a different kind of eye candy. No, they didn’t rebuild it to run out on the track, but rather, they customized it to be the track itself.

Taking their expertise on building custom race tacks and using it to the full hilt, Slot Mods managed to turn an old race car into one that brings the track with it. If for nothing else, it makes for the kind of conversation-starter that Slot Mods has come to be known for.

Check out the video of the Slot Mods race track build on a 1969 Chevrolet Sunoco Camaro. Really, you couldn’t make this stuff up - even if you wanted to.

In the early-1960s, Ford had gained an interest in long-distance road racing and decided it was time to invest in a car that could compete in the likes of the 24 Hours of Le Mans race. In 1963, Ford and Ferrari Ferrari struck a deal for production, but Ferrari cut the project off after they couldn’t come to an agreement as to whether Ford could participate in the Indy 500 or not.

Ford then decided if Ferrari wasn’t going to work with them, they were going to beat them. Ford negotiated with both Lotus and Lola before deciding to go with Lola, but the car was a complete mess and retired much more than it finished. After the 1964 Nassau race, Carroll Shelby stepped in to right the ship.

Between 1966 and 1969, the GT40 went on to win the Le Mans an impressive four times in a row, entrenching it in racing history and propelling Carroll Shelby Shelby even further into legendary status. Following the 1969 model year, the GT project was shut down and the GT40 production stopped at just 107 cars, ending its impressive run.

Check out our full review on the GT40 after the jump.

When Toyota re-entered the affordable sports car market with the GT-86 , they definitely didn’t tell us about how extensive their plans really were for the car. Turns out, it’s more than just a sports coupe; it also has plenty of race car iterations.

Their latest race car spec for the GT 86 is called the CS-V3 Racer, a race car that’s been built to compete in the V3 class of the VLN series.

In order to give it all the right specs needed for competition, Toyota gave the GT 86 CS-V3 a new racing exhaust, a track-focused suspension, high-performance brakes, and a stronger chassis with optimized weight distribution. Under the hood, the same 2.0-liter four-cylinder model can be found with an output of 200 horsepower.

For all intents and purposes, the 86 CS-V3 has been described as "an entry-level race car for easy maintenance, low running costs and great fun", something Yoshiaki Kinoshita, TMG President, has described as a car that’s ideally suited for production-based motorsport.

"We want to share the passion of motorsport with as many people as possible and this car is the result," Kinoshita said.

"It already looks fantastic and has superb handling, so with further performance and safety upgrades we have created a really exciting and competitive car which is extremely cost effective."

The Toyota GT-86 CS-V3 has been priced at €38,500, which is around $47,850 at the current exchange rates.


Though NASCAR lists pretty far down our list of favorite racing series, the movie “Days of Thunder” is one that took NASCAR and made it interesting for everyone. Maybe it was the droves of 20-something women drooling over the pre-nutzoid Tom Cruise, but there was something about it that people liked. It was so well liked that there was even a pretty shoddy video game made about it.

Well, we have received word that the director behind “Days of Thunder,” along with “Top Gun” and a slew of other movies, Tony Scott, was found dead after jumping from the Vincent Thomas Bridge in San Pedro, California. His death was an apparent suicide, as investigators found a suicide note in his Toyota Prius.

There are no reports as to what exactly caused Scott to leap off of the 365-foot-tall bridge to his death, but we’re sure some details will arise in the coming days.

This is not the first time a person of notoriety has leaped to their death from this 6,060-foot-long suspension bridge. Back in 1990, Larry Andreasen, a bronze metal winner in the 1964 Olympics, leaped from the bridge in an attempt to set the world diving record.

Our condolences go out to Scott’s family and he will be forever remembered for his contributions to the movie world.

Source: NewsDay

When it comes to small sports cars, very few in the business make it as good as Lotus . Make no mistake, despite their recent bad press, Lotus still knows what it takes to build these babies, and more importantly, race-spec versions of these aforementioned babies.

Take for example their latest toy, the Exige V6 Cup. Making their debuts at the Lotus Festival in Brands Hatch in the UK, the Exige V6 Cup has been touted as the most sinister version of the Exige line. Here’s the best part, the V6 Cup comes in two specs: Track Day and Full-On Competition Spec.

In order to make it about as race-spec as can be, Lotus fitted the Exige V6 with just about every race goodie they could get their hands on. Among the new features include the company’s exclusive Lotus Dynamic Performance Management system, a system that allows the driver to switch between a number of driving modes, including Race, Sport and Touring. From there, the car also gets a new rear diffuser and wing, an aero-optimized front splitter, a multi-adjustable suspension system, a removable steering wheel, HANS-compliant race seats, a choice of 4- or 6-point race harnesses, a racing roll cage, and a fire extinguisher that’s FIA-compliant.

Under its hood, the Exige V6 Cup is powered by a 3.5-liter V6 engine that produces 346 horsepower with a curb weight of 1,080 kg/2,381 lbs, a 0-62 mph of just 3.5 seconds, and a top speed of 170 mph.

Lotus announced that the Exige V6 Cup will be produced by the end of the year with a delivery time by March next year. It will an initial schedule of 20 models.

A Formula One race car is capable of so many things, but we didn’t know that it could also carry a tune.

While promoting the 2013 Grand Prix of America, which will be held at the Port Imperial Street Circuit in Weehawken, New Jersey, Red Bull Racing gave its F1 racer the platform to sing, of all things, the Star-Spangled Banner.

In this video, the race car stretches its vocal chords with an impressive rendition of America’s national anthem, complete with high-pitches and dives that are eerily similar to how we sing our beloved anthem. Sure, there were some pitch issues here and there, but not enough to warrant scolding, especially when the singer in this instance, happens to be an actual race car.

Check out the video of Red Bull Racing’s F1 car doing its best Star-Spangled Banner rendition in the backdrop of the Statue of Liberty. Certainly, it doesn’t get any more American than this.


NHRA Top Fuel racers are a special breed. They essentially strap some of the most powerful engines in the world to the end of a metal rod and clear a quarter-mile track in less than 4 seconds. They do all of this out in the open air, as NHRA regulations prohibited the use of canopies since they pose the risk of giving a competitive edge.

For about four years, Don Schumacher Racing has been working on a canopy designed to help prevent the issue of flying debris striking a driver at 300 mph. Last year, Tony Schumacher ran in preseason testing with said canopy and the NHRA took notice.

After a series of test runs, the findings were that the advantages gained from the more aerodynamic cockpit were nearly non-existent. This all leads to today when the NHRA has finally green lighted its drivers to start using these new cockpits. However, there is a stipulation, as any driver using an enclosed cockpit must put a 3/4-inch wicker bill on the downstream end of the cockpit to offset the aero advantage.

The canopy will makes its in-season debut this weekend in the Lucas Oil NHRA Nationals, covering the head of none other than the spearhead of this program, Tony Schumacher’s No. 5 U.S. Army dragster

This is definitely a good jump toward making drag racing, top fuel in particular, a much safer sport for its drivers and we can see nearly every team changing over to this format in the near future.


Back to top