race cars

race cars

  Race cars have all the safety equipment and power required to win races and protect their driver at the same time. Some of them are street legal but most of them are not

Toyota managed to climb itself back into road racing with the development of the TS030 prototype, but it wasn’t without its issues. The entire project was delayed by a month, due to damages caused to its monocoque from a wreck during a round of practice.

Some people may think that Toyota is haphazardly testing these cars without the drivers being properly trained, but they would be sorely incorrect with that thought. Since before Toyota pulled out of road racing, it has had a racing simulator to allow drivers to get a good feel for the car they will be driving and the track they will be on.

The simulator, according to TMG driver, Kazuki Nakajima, has all of the pedal and steering wheel feel of the real cars, as well as the real feel of the track. Much like the simulator rides that were popular in the early-1990s and are still around today, the simulator is on a hydraulic base that bounces the car and moves it along with the driver‘s input through the steering, brakes, and gas.

The simulator includes 20 different tracks, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans track that you see in the above video. It also includes a slew of cars, so that drivers can get the feel of the varying cars TMG uses in races. Mild adjustments are made to the simulator to compensate for changes in the vehicle’s suspension, aerodynamics, horsepower, etc., making for a very real experience for the drivers.

Have a look at the above video and see the simulator in action yourself.

It’s been a couple of weeks since we saw the first episode of McLaren ’s animated series featuring Formula 1 stars Jenson Button and Lewis Hamilton . Now, it’s time for episodes 2 and 3 of the series.

Episode 2 is called "Slicks" and takes Lewis and Jenson to the McLaren Technology Center for some hi-jinx with safety features, while Episode 3 - called "Track to the Future" - shows off the future of the race car. In both episodes, Jenson and Lewis are still up to their old tricks and bring an onslaught of hilarity to an otherwise weird McLaren production.

McLaren will launch a new episode every week during the British GP and the animated series actually airs on SKY Sports F1.

Hit the jump to watch Episode 03.

The Porsche 918 Spyder has become an extremely sought-after supercar, and considering that it’s still in its prototype stages, it’s become one of the most highly anticipated ones too.

Now we know how automakers are careful with divulging too much with their prototype models so they resort to the tried-and-tested method of dressing these models up in camouflage. Porsche has obviously done this on numerous occasions, but for the 918 Spyder, they’re taking a slightly different route.

Together with long-time partner Martini Racing , the German automaker has revisited the iconic Martini Porsche race cars by dressing up the 918 Spyder Prototype in the legendary Martini livery.
Development of the Porsche 918 Spyder is still ongoing with the car now moving its extensive testing phase to the Nurburgring. Apparently, riding around one of the most famous tracks in the world has conjured up nostalgic emotions and the result is one of the most awesome liveries to ever be dressed on a Porsche.

Hit the jump for more information on the Porsche 918 Spyder Martini Racing Prototype.

The Toyota GT 86 is becoming a favorite race car for a lot of upcoming racing series and apparently, it’s headed for another one.

The Japanese automaker recently announced that they’re bringing their new sports coupe to the Production Class of the British 24-hour Endurance Race. It will see action dressed with a livery inspired by the 1980’s British Touring Car Championship-winning AE86 Corolla GT. As it currently stands, the car is still under development at the Buckinghamshire Technical Center of GPRM, these are the same folks responsible for building the BTCC Toyota Avensis racer from a few years ago.

Full specifications have not yet been revealed, but according to Toyota, the race-spec GT 86 will carry a host of racing modifications that the company explains will turn the sports car into a "competitive track machine" that will retain as much of the production version’s specification as possible.

"We are concentrating our efforts on stripping back the chassis, lightening and strengthening it and of course equipping it with a roll cage and all the other safety gear required, as well as quick-refuelling equipment," said GPRM’s Gary Blackham.

"Other than that, the GT86 will remain essentially in road car form."

Since the British 24 Hour Endurance Race won’t begin until the weekend of September 22nd at the Silverstone Grand Prix, we’ll have more time to find out more about this race-spec GT 86 race car before it makes its endurance debut.

Just weeks ago, Spanish F1 driver Maria de Villota was in a horrific crash during testing of her new Marussia MR-01 racecar. In fact, it was her first test drive ever and the injuries were apparently very serious. The only injury we were made aware of initially was the fact that she lost an eye.

Fortunately, the injuries were not so severe to put her life in direct risk, as it was just announced that she was released from the hospital. There was some speculation that Maria would require brain surgery, but following some testing, it was found that there wasn’t any damage that would require this risky surgery.

Though she will not spend any more time in the hospital, physicians will continue to monitor her at home to assure that her recovery stays on schedule. She will be undergoing surgery to repair damage done to her face during the accident, so we wish her the best in the rest of her recovery and her future plastic surgery.

Marussia has also officially chalked the crash up as a combination of several driver errors. The first error was that she was unable to find the clutch lever, which was in an unexpected position because the wheel was not centered. Also, when she came into the pits, de Villota forgot to press the neutral button to keep the car out of gear. These are all freak lapses that most F1 drivers remember almost instinctively, but while testing a new car, these steps can sometimes be forgotten.

On an aside, Maria will likely have to take significant time off, as the FIA does not issue international licenses for five years following the loss of an eye. This give the brain time to adjust using just a single eye.

Our best wishes go out to Maria de Villota and we hope for a speedy recovery.

Source: BBC

Just about every day, we see a new on-car camera shot that is exhilarating, but it’s always lacking something. This “something” that they always lack is the "real" feeling of the driver’s point of view, as the camera is usually connected to the car or on the top of the driver’s helmet.

Well, F1 Driver, Lucas di Grassi decided that it was time to give us a real-life driver’s-eye view of him racing his open-wheel car. He accomplished this by placing a small camera directly in front of one of his eyes, so he was literally driving with just one eye.

Granted, there were no other drivers on the course, but to see him navigate the Spa-Francorchamps circuit in the rain was a thing of beauty. In addition, he gave us a taste of some of the speeds they drive by getting his car up to 280 km/h (174 mph) at the 2:45 mark, which is impressive enough in the rain, but with just one eye is simply nuts.

Take a look at the above video to get a true driver’s-eye view of the craziness that F1 drivers have to deal with every race day. It’s pretty intense to say the least.

With the exception of NASCAR , the world of auto racing is in a bit of turmoil, especially in Europe. The SRO already announced that the FIA GT1 World and GT3 European Championships were canceled this year, and now we can add yet another European series to this list. The Automobile Club de l’Ouest (ALO) has just let us know that the European Le Mans Series’ (ELMS) last two races have been canceled.

The ELMS is citing a low number of cars at the starting grid for its cancellation of the final two event. This is not up for debate as a lowly 13 cars were at the starting line for last weekend’s event. Even at the debut event for 2012 only 21 cars in total arrived at the starting grid.

The combination of a competitive GT series in Europe and the global economic crisis are mostly to blame for the lack of entrants. All of the car owners are going to the races where there is the best money to be made, regardless of the event’s prestige.

There is a silver lining to this announcement, as a deal was struck for the remaining 14 teams in the ELMS to join forces with the American Le Mans Series (ALMS) and run in the 1,000-mile/10-hour Petit Le Mans endurance race held at Road Atlanta. Given all of the European teams show up, this will increase the field at this race to 54 competitors, so things could get a little hairy at times.

The ELMS will give its drivers double points at this race, which will help compensate for the two canceled races.

We are hoping that this all gets settled down, as the ELMS has always been good for exciting races – more so than NASCAR , at least. We could even see a full season of the ELMS and ALMS teaming up, which may be a good idea for both series until this economic recession finishes its course.

Source: SPEED

The final of a series of four Ferraris being auctioned on behalf of the late Sherman Wolf’s estate is an ultra-rare 1953 Ferrari 340 Ferrari 340 MM Competition Vignale Spider. Only a total of 10 340 MM models were ever produced, with chassis No. 0350 AM, the example scheduled for auction, being the final of the 10 built.

Bodied by Vignale, this fine example boasts an elongated hood, rounded and some what bug-eye-like headlights, a large open mouth, and curvy front fenders. You also get a short windscreen that actually is in an “M” shape, giving in a unique look. Down the side of this classic Ferrari racer, there’s a set of port holes to extract heat from the engine and a forward-pointing arrow with the number “64” on it.

The backside of this 340 MM is as short as the front end is long and it is rather round. It boasts a pair of small brake lights and a pair of heat extractors for the rear brakes. Protruding from the underside are a pair of exhaust pipes that the engine exhales through.

The corners of this 340 MM boast wire wheels, just like it had in its racing days. The entire body is draped in a white undercoat with a blue strip that circles the entire car, front to rear. The body and paint are in their original and un-restored condition, so expect a few bumps and bruises here and there. For the most part, however, the body looks to be in excellent shape.

Under the hood of this 340 MM is a Aurelio Lampredi-designed 4.5-liter V-12 engine that pumps out 375 horsepower. This engine is known more for its lightweight design and efficiency, as its cylinder heads and block are from a cast alloy, which is both strong and lightweight.

This super-rare Ferrari will not come cheap, however, as Gooding & Company expects it to fetch between $4.5 and $6.5 million.

Hit the jump for the official press release.

Posted on by Brad Anderson 0

In the late-1960s, the Corvette was one of the “cars to beat” in varying racing series. It was also one of the few American cars that stood a chance against the likes of Ferrari , Aston Martin , and Porsche . One car, however, has topped every other Corvette throughout its lifespan: this is the 1968 Chevrolet L-88 Corvette Owens/Corning FIA/SCCA Racing Car with the chassis No. OCF/T.P.I. 002-68.

With its numerous victories in SCCA and FIA races throughout its life, particularly in the ’60s and `70s, this L-88 Corvette is often referred to as the most victorious racing Corvette ever. Now, documentation is scarce on some other Corvettes, so that is technically an unofficial title, but regardless, it is one accomplished piece of machinery.

After its retirement, this particular model was lost in the shuffle and wasn’t found again until its previous owner decided he had to have it. After hiring Corvette specialist, David Reisner, to find this classic `Vette, he finally met the Corvette he had been searching for. It was found at Road Atlanta when a colleague of Reisner overheard a racer claiming his `Vette as being an ex-Jerry Hansen and Owens/Corning car.

After all of this time and money spent searching for this car, it is now being presented at auction by RM Auctions in August 2012.

Click past the jump to read our full review.

Source: RM Auctions

The Ford Fusion NASCAR and the Dodge Charger NASCAR have just met their competitor for the 2013 racing season: the new Chevrolet Camaro NASCAR. The top-selling sports car in America will make its series debut in February 2013 at the Daytona International Speedway.

The Camaro NASCAR is painted in a very cool blue paint finish and features a unique power-bulge hood and deep recessed grille, as well as distinctive halo light rings and dual-port grille appearances, and the gold bowtie.

"Our team of Chevrolet designers and aerodynamic engineers did a fantastic job capturing the great looks and styling cues of the production Camaro, while providing our NASCAR Nationwide teams with a highly competitive aero platform," said Pat Suhy, manager, Chevrolet Racing Oval Track Group. "For the remainder of 2012, our engineers will be busy working with our Chevy teams on wind tunnel and on-track testing to fine-tune the car in preparation for next year. It will be great to see Camaro compete on the track against its showroom competition starting with the 2013 season opener at Daytona."


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