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Renault Alpine

Renault Alpine


The name Alpine is close to the hearts of many French car enthusiasts. The Renault-owned manufacturer made machines that knew how to carve up the street of the track. Alpine hasn’t produced a car of its own since 1996, but the horsepower wars was supposed to rekindle the Alpine flame .

Unfortunately the worldwide economic meltdown extinguished the hopes for the brand’s revival. Renault’s Chief operating officer Patrick Pelata told Autocar: "It’s a casualty of the [economic] crisis."

Then again we knew this was coming. The new Alpine was supposed to share a platform with the upcoming Nissan 200SX. So two weeks ago when we got word that Nissan killed the 200SX, we should have also seen it as the death of the new Alpine.

Source: AutoCar

Renault is planning to relaunch the Alpine brand, but faithful TopSpeed readers already knew that. What is new is that the future Alpine might be based on the future Nissan 370Z. According to CarTribe, when the next Alpine debuts in November at the L.A. Auto Show, it will use the Infiniti G37 Coupe/Nissan 370Z Nissan 370Z underpinnings. This is a logical step considering Nissan’s FM platform is the basis for almost all of Nissan’s rear-wheel drive cars including the GT-R, and Renault has an alliance with Nissan.

The FM platform is designed to move the engine back in the chassis, which offers good weight distribution. The Alpine brand is known for weight reduction as well as performance engines, which is a good thing because the FM platform is also known to be a little heavier than the competition. Production should begin before 2012.

Source: CarTribe

This extravagantly concept was designed by Arseny Kostromin. The project was made during an internship in Renault design center.

We have to admit if the future Renault Alpine will look something like this (we seriously doubt it!) the sports car market will have a new serious competitor!


Of course Renault denied it, it’s normal after all - the auto makers have a strange habit of denying everything that’s cool. But it will happen! The Alpine brand will be revived and the company will bring it’s first sports car since the RenaultSport Spider.

The new Alpine model will be launched in 2011. "Since the company’s conception in the 1950s, Alpine cars have been defined by their lightweight constructions and their affordability," Pelata told Autocar. "Our intention is to revive the brand with a car that has the same virtues."

The 2011 Alpine model will be powered by a longitudinally mounted four-cylinder turbocharged petrol engine that will deliver enough power -at least 220bhp - to can easily compete with Mazda MX-5.

There are no news about what platform the future Alpine will use, but the biggest clue dropped thus far was the Nissan Urge concept – an open, longitudinally-engined two-seat concept shown by Nissan in 2006, based on a shortened version of the 350Z’s underpinnings.

Source: AutoCar

Renault is working on the rebirth of the Alpine mark. A concept version will be unveiled in Geneva in March, or at the Paris Motor Show in October.

Both choices are very plausible: Paris to mark the fact that Alpine is a French mark, Geneva is also very possible considering this time Alpine wants to conquer whole Europe. We just need to wait and see!

And the second question is: which will be the first model of the rebirth: a small roadster or a coupe GT powered by a Nissan V6 engine? Well, again, we will need to wait until March to see!

Based upon the French classic Renault Alpini 108 - year 1956, the Willys Interlagos was the first series production sport car produced in Brazil and, even now-a-days, it is object of desire for sport cars collectors and enthusiasts. The original model was brought to Brazil by Willys Overland do Brazil by influence of the adman Mauro Salles, and enthusiast of cars who named the model after the city of São Paulo famous auto race track. With a production of more than 800 units between 1964 (...)

Presented at the Paris Auto Show in 1963, Jean Redele unveiled the Alpine A110 after his prior successes with the A106 and A108. The A110 was a true departure for the company as styling was largely revised and the Dieppe-based firm began building one of their more respected models that would remain in limited production for over a decade.


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