speculative

speculative

  Speculative article about vehicles with no official information available but strongly believed to be release in the near future.

Only two years after the release of the C7 Corvette Stingray, Mark Reuss, GM’s global product chief, says the automaker is already working on the next generation of Corvette, though deeper details are nearly non-existent.

The news comes at the tail end of a Detroit Free Press report regarding the growing positive corporate morale within the company’s ranks. Despite all the bad press surrounding General Motors’ ignition switch recall fiasco, CEO change-up, and continually growing list of non-related vehicle recalls, Reuss says morale is higher than it was in 2012, when GM employees were last surveyed. He attributes the growth to a greater emphasis on transparency within the company as a result of the recent recalls.

Besides the news of happy employees, fans of GM’s high-performance halo car can widen their smiles as well. The next generation of Corvette is already on the drawing board. This means The General may shorten the lifespan of the C7 Vette, keeping the iconic Corvette nameplate fresh and competitive in the world’s arena. Unlike the C6 Corvette, which grew stale after an eight-year production run, the C7 may find itself replaced sooner. With competitors like Ferrari generally on a tighter and shorter shelf life, GM would be wise to adopt such a strategy.

Vehicle development these days is a long and exhausting process with years of design work done before the first prototypes are constructed. Considering that, the C7 will definitely enjoy several more years as the latest Vette, but we’d suspect GM will introduce its replacement by 2020, six years after the C7’s 2014 introduction.

Click past the jump to read more about the current Chevrolet Corvette Stingray.

Ever find yourself wishing for a McLaren with more trunk space? Well, that might be in the works, according to a report from Car & Driver. Supposedly, McLaren is working on several variants of the upcoming 2015 P13, including a “GT” that features a trunk area on the rear of the car.

A rear trunk is a pretty normal thing, but not for mid-engine supercars with V-8 powerplants. Sure, the Porsche Cayman has a boot, but its flat six-cylinder options are far more compact than the P13’s 3.8-liter, twin-turbo V-8. What’s more, the current McLarens’ rear ends have little free real estate due to cooling ducts, exhaust pipes, and the mechanics for the active rear wing.

C&D says their source is a well-informed McLaren insider who confirms the GT’s development. Additionally, McLaren believes it will be the best-selling iteration of the new P13.

The source also alluded to the automaker using some nifty engineering in order to keep the luggage compartment from becoming hot from its twin-turbocharged neighbor. Also included in the GT’s design will be a concave rear window similar to the one found on the Ferrari 206 GT Dino of the 1960s.

Though the GT version of the P13 is making headlines, the standard coupe and a drop-top Spider version will also be available. All P13 variants will include the same carbon-fiber monocell construction and come powered by the same 3.8-liter V-8 as found in the 12C, 650S, and P1 — though the engine will be detuned to somewhere between 450 and 470 horsepower.

Click past the jump to read more about the future McLaren P13.

Ever since Alfa Romeo announced it would bring “something new ” to the 4C with every passing year, we’ve been speculating what the Italian automaker might have up its sleeve. Though it’s pure speculation at this point, our rendering artist has put together a possible direction for a future direction, the 4C Quadrifoglio Verde.

The Quadrifoglio Verde name harks back to Alfa’s long history of performance vehicles dating back to 1923, and this car would be no different. Likely getting a slight bump in power, the coupe gets an even more aggressive body treatment with several new scoops, front and rear fascias, and accent lines.

Its front fascia gets a completely redesigned bumper with larger air intakes near the darkened headlights. Around the side, a lowered body skirt helps bring the 4C’s visual mass lower to the ground. Out back, a new lower bumper sports a new exhaust pipe design while the rear quarter panels have another cooling slot near the round taillights. Topping it all off are the iconic green cloverleaf and grey triangle badges. A new set of 10-spoke grey wheels helps complete the more aggressive look.

While it’s still unclear what Alfa has planned for its future 4C special editions, we suspect they will consist mostly of cosmetic changes, with only slight modifications to the suspension and engine.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2016 Alfa Romeo 4C QV.

Note: Porsche 550 rendered here.

The rumors about Porsche’s baby-Boxster roadster are swirling up again with new reports coming out of Germany. This time, the news suggests the new car will surface for the 2016 model year and sport two versions of a flat-four engine. Dubbed the 718, this rumored roadster will slot under the Boxster in terms of price, horsepower, and weight, while still offering plenty of go-fast performance for buyers looking to spend less than the Boxster’s $63,000 asking price.

The report from Focus pins the 718’s two four-cylinders as displacing 2.0- and 2.5-liters with horsepower outputs of 282 and 355, respectively. Porsche will combine these engines with a DSG gearbox and manual transmissions that will drive the rear wheels. The combination of a lighter, mid-mounted, four-cylinder engine and a lighter chassis means the 718 will surely be a hot performer.

Rumors also claim that Porsche engineers are using a modified Boxster platform with a reduction in mass coming from extensive uses of aluminum. It wouldn’t be surprising to see the new Roadster also use lots of carbon fiber, as the cost of CF production keeps falling and becomes more pervasive in the industry.

Though the official word isn’t out yet, experts say the car will cost roughly $53,000 — a solid $10K less than the base Boxster. That said, the 718’s upper trim level, which includes the 355-horsepower, 2.5-liter four-cylinder, will probably only undercut the Boxster by a few thousand. Either way, we appear to be getting a more pure drop-top from Stuttgart by 2016.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 718.

Source: Focus

If you’re a regular listener to our TopSpeed Podcasts, you’re likely familiar with our affinity with high-tech halo cars and the benefits they bring to less expensive, more everyday cars by technology trickle-down. Well, it appears Porsche is planning to share a few of the 918 hybrid hyper car’s parts with an upcoming version of the 911 Turbo S, and the Panamera Turbo S.

Why add a hybrid system to a car as seamless as the 911? The benefits are numerous and often obvious, but sometimes can be more obscure. The easiest positive to recognize is more horsepower. Adding the 918’s 156-horsepower electric motor to the 911 Turbo S’ 560-horsepower flat six results in a possible 716-horsepower hybrid drivetrain. That would help the 911 run the ‘ring with the latest Lamborghinis and Ferraris out there.

On the more obscure side, adding a plug-in hybrid system would allow the 911 to drive within Europe’s future Zero-Emissions Zones where conventional engines are banned in congested urban environments. Switch to full-electric mode, and the car becomes legal to drive downtown.

What’s more, it shouldn’t be difficult for Porsche to tailor the e-Hybrid system for not just the 911 and Panamera, but for other vehicles in the future. It’s possible for the trickle-down to continue further into even more affordable vehicles like the Cayman and Boxster, but only after the development and hardware costs come down. This not only helps Porsche’s overall CAFE ratings, but helps boost horsepower ratings and performance standards as well.

It sounds like a win-win to us.

Click past the jump to read more about the current Porsche 911 Turbo S.

Source: MotorTrend

The news surrounding the BMW i8 is relentless these days with information flowing in left and right. But sadly, the latest bit of news doesn’t hold much promise for those looking forward to a sportier version of the i8 or a replacement for the M1 coming from the i8 platform.

Our German friends over at Autovisie sat down with Carsten Pries, BMW’s head of Product Management M, for a recent interview. His issue lies with creating competition for its own i8 by flooding the already-small segment with low sales volumes. Not to mention the need to develop more powerful hybrid technology and a larger engine sized properly for an i8-like car. What’s more, the i8 was developed from the ground up to be an electric hybrid with only a small gasoline engine.

The lack of an outright M model based on the i8 doesn’t completely spell disaster. Friedrich Nitschke, the CEO of BMW M, says the fuel-saving technology from the i8 might wind up in future M models while the sportier aspects of the M Division might find its way onto future i models.

While these words came from BMW corporate heads, Pries and Nitschke may be bluffing about the existence of a high-performance hybrid supercar. Only time will tell, so stay tuned to TopSpeed for any breaking information.

Click past the jump to read more about the BMW i8.

Source: telegraaf.nl

If you pay any attention to the TopSpeed Podcast , it will have become abundantly clear that we all like Porsches, and that the Cayman is top on our list for greatest driver’s cars. With the recent spy shots of the Porsche Cayman GT4 , we thought it was time we took a quick look at what makes the new potential Cayman special, and what it may mean for the rest of the Porsche family.

The birth of the Cayman was purely to fill a gap in Porsche’s lineup. It was an artificial car with artificial specifications. It had an engine, horsepower rating, top speed and price, that was exactly between the Boxster and the 911.

Thanks to its mid-engine design the Cayman has always felt like the better handling car, but Porsche refused to let it eclipse the power or performance of the 911. That seems until now, anyways. If the rumors about the GT4 Cayman are correct, it is positioned to be a better car than the base 911 Carrera , and potentially even the RWD Carrera S. If true, this could make the GT4 Cayman one of the best driver’s cars Porsche has ever created.

Read on to find out what makes the Porsche Cayman GT4 so special

Ferrari will have five new cars to release in the next five years. And that number doesn’t include special editions, one-offs or anything like that. Doesn’t that sound super amazing?!

Well it does sound cool, but the news is not as big as it sounds. Ferrari has been on a yearly update schedule for quite a while now. That is simply their main business plan. Every year we get a revised model, and every four years, that model gets a heavy update. So we had things like the 599 GTB that became the 599 GTO . For the current lineup, we got the California, then the 458 , the FF came after that, and now we have the F12 Berlinetta . Then the cycle began its repeat with this year’s California T , the first major refresh. Next year should see a faster, modified version of the 458 arrive.

Ferrari is also still enforcing its 7,000-car maximum production limit, so there won’t be any more available than there already are. I think the really big takeaway from the announcement was the fact that Ferrari said they are still exclusively using V-8 and V-12 engines. There were rumors of something like a forced induction V-6 in a potential 458 update, so those are now basically dead. Ferrari also is not going to heavily invest into hybrid systems until the tech reaches a level they deem satisfactory.

As cool as the announcement of a new lineup of Ferrari’s seems, it’s actually just business as usual.

But what if Ferrari didn’t do business as usual? What if Ferrari decided it wanted to dramatically increase sales, and didn’t care so much about its brand prestige and message? It worked wonders for Porsche with models like the Cayenne .

Hit the break to see our self-destructing, five-year Ferrari plan; brand prestige be damned.

Well we know it is coming, but we finally have the first solid, rolling evidence of the new four-cylinder Porsche Boxster .

Our spy photographers have captured a new mule doing the rounds at the Nürburgring. While there are no visual cues that this taped up convertible is only running on four-cylinders, our spies report that the exhaust note was anything but the traditional flat-six wail the usually exits the rear of the Porsche .

While there have been some rumors that the upcoming four-banger Porsche may be using a more traditional in-line design engine than a flat-four setup, our spies were only able to catch it for two laps, so there was not enough listening time accurately gauge the engine note.

Beyond the engine note, this appears to be a fairly standard Porsche Boxster with some tape and sensors collecting loads of fancy data for the German engineers to salivate over.

If you ever really doubted all of Porsche’s plans to bring a four-cylinder car to market, this should finally put all those doubts to rest. We may even get shots of the new four-banger Cayman soon as well.

Expect to see a full announcement before the end of the year, with an on-sale date early in 2015.

Click past the jump for more photos of the new Porsche Boxster

Once BMW confirmed that the coupe and convertible versions of the 1 Series would be marketed as the 2 Series , it was clear as daylight that a high performance M2 version is underway.

We’ve already rendered the successor to the cool 1M and strolled through plenty of details about the upcoming coupe, but the time has come to have a look at the real deal, as our skilled paparazzi have caught a prototype version of the M2 stretching its wheels somewhere in Germany .

Far from being a production-ready vehicle, this mule wears front and rear fascias similar to those seen on the M235i Coupe , but it appears to be fitted with wider fenders. Other details that highlight the vehicle’s ankle-biting nature are the M-style wheels wrapped in Michelin tires and the cross-drilled rotors paired with blue brake calipers.

As development continues, we’re expecting to see a more aggressive front bumper, a more pronounced rear diffuser, and quad exhaust pipes.

Naturally, the M2 will be the most powerful model in the 2-Series range, with its twin-turbocharged, 3.0-liter inline-six to deliver around 400 horsepower. That’s about 80 horses more than the M235i, just enough to turn the M2 into a heck of a coupe.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2016 BMW M2 Coupe.


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