Supercars / Exotic cars

Supercars / Exotic cars

  A Supercar is a sports car, typically an exotic or rare one, whose performance is highly superlative to its contemporary sports cars. They are pure bestial look and performance. Even if you never own one of these they will change the way you feel about cars just by looking at them.

Introduced in 1999, the Pagani Zonda was supposed to retire this year once the fifth and final example of the Zonda Revolucion rolled out of Horacio’s workshop in Modena, Italy. However, a mysterious vehicle that surfaced online recently suggests the company has built one more supercar before closing the Zonda chapter once and for all.

Although Pagani has yet to reveal any details about this peculiar model, the folks over at Prototype Zero claim it’s a unique vehicle that has been christened LM. The bespoke supercar is reportedly based on the 760 RS model and pays tribute to the iconic 24 Hours of Le Mans race. Unlike other special edition Zondas, the LM is supposed to wear a revised front fascia with brand-new headlamps.

The video below doesn’t shed too much light on that aspect, mainly because the vehicle’s front end is covered in duct tape, but it does reveal other features that make us believe we’re not looking at a "regular" Zonda. For instance, it carries a huge wing that’s different than the one seen on the Zonda Revolucion. What’s more, it sports "LM" graphics on the rear fenders and tricolore stripes depicting the Italian flag on one side and the German flag on the other.

The rest of the body appears to be built on standard 760 RS specifications, including wider fenders, a roof-mounted airscoop and rear fender intakes. Power should come from the same AMG-sourced, 6.0-liter V-12 mill, but we wouldn’t be surprised if output figures would blow past the 800-horsepower mark.

All told, this is an intriguing Zonda we’re very anxious to learn more about, so make sure you stay tuned to TopSpeed for more details.

Update 6/20/2014: A video of the 760 LM’s reveal made it to the Internet, but was swiftly deleted. We managed to grab the video before the uploader deleted it, and you can see it after the jump.

Click past the jump to read more about the Pagani Zonda LM.

If you can find another car that’s as exclusive as the Lamborghini Veneno , we’d love to hear about it. But as it stands, this mental Italian supercar is one of the rarest in the world with Lambo only building three models for sale. Another one is being kept in-house in Sant’Agata just so Lamborghini can keep studying it for its future models.

As far as the three, we already know where the two are. They’re both in the U.S. To be more specific, the rare Lambos are in the garage of Lamborghini Long Island owner Antoine Dominic in New York and that of Tequesta Investments managing director Kris Singh in Florida. Both paid $4 million for their respective Venenos, thereby assuring their place in a most exclusive of clubs.

As for the third Veneno, that one is reportedly headed to Macau, China, or as folks on that side of the world would call it, the high-rollers’ playground. It’s only appropriate that a $4 million supercar would find its way to a loving owner in Macau who probably spends that much money in a day’s worth of gambling anyway.

Lifestyles of the rich and famous, indeed. That particular Veneno will be perfectly at home in a place where supercars and luxury cars run the roads like nobody’s business. But even those exotics will surely slow down and acquiese to the Veneno when its new owner proudly takes it out for a spin.

That’s the cache that comes with being an ultra rare $4 million supercar like what the Veneno is.

Click past the jump to read more about Lamborghini Veneno.

Source: dpccars

Some people may think of the McLaren 650S as the blood child of the 12C and the P1 in terms of its design, but there’s more to the British automaker’s newest baby than meets the (P1’s) eye. This video of the 650S arriving in Monza for some test runs is all the proof you need to conclude that the this supercar has an identity that’s all its own. From those throaty engine starts that sound like a lion’s roar, all the way to those high-speed accelerations and fly-bys, there’s something totally demonic about the 650S.

It’s not the kind that will make children cower in fear, although hearing the supercar roar could do it anyway.

On the contrary, it’s the kind of evil that’ll make grown men pause and wonder what possessed McLaren to build such a machine that’s capable of not only extraordinary power and speed, but actually looks good doing it.

Still not a believer? Turn up the volume and click play. It may seem rather repetitious, but after the first few cranks and starts, you learn to love hearing it over and over again.

It’s always been a fantasy to lock a brand new supercar away in storage till the day its inevitable popularity started to resurge and its price tag would fetch far more profit than the car was originally worth. That’s exactly what we see here with this nearly flawless example of a 1982 Lamborghini Countach LP5000S.

With only 8,543 miles on the odometer, this Lamborghini has been kept in dry storage while still getting regular maintenance and exercise from its owner and certified Lamborghini dealerships. Just recently the car underwent an $8,000 refurbishing job, getting it ready for auction in June 2014 at the Historics at Brooklands near London.

Not only is the car’s condition something of rarity, the Countach itself is only one of 2,042 ever built. What’s more, this particular model is one of only 321 built with the massive 4.8-liter, V-12 engine in 1982. It’s mated to a five-speed manual transmission that helps launch the car to 62 mph in 5.4 seconds on its way to a 160-mph top speed.

If you happen to be in the market for a nearly brand-new Countach, the bidding happens on Saturday, June 7th with viewing commencing the day before. It’s estimated the car will sell for between $185,000 and $243,000, so be sure to bring your accountant to pay for it.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1982 Lamborghini Countach.

There are only a handful of people in this world who have the opportunity of sitting behind the wheel of a McLaren P1 and putting it through the paces.

Motor Trend’s Ignition web series got the opportunity to be one of those few lucky ones, and as you can expect, host Carlos Lago went to town with the P1, stretching it in ways very few supercars in this world are capable of.

Featuring some of the most advanced technology in the industry, including those derived from Formula One , the P1 has indeed risen to the top of the pecking order as one of the best examples of a car that has put all its tools and characteristics in the right place, in line with McLaren’s goal for the exotic to become one of the best driver’s cars in the world.

To be honest, we didn’t need Lago to tell us the things that make the P1 awesome because quite frankly, all of us knows them already. But it surely doesn’t hurt watching Lago get a chance to take the P1 out for three laps of scintillating fun with McLaren’s newest crown jewel. One thing Lago did do for us is sneak off to a runway and show us how fast the P1 hits 60 mph and 100 mph, and how quick it can run the quarter-mile.

A successor to the Lexus LF-A has been in the pipeline for quite some time now and while it remains unclear on when the supercar will be launched, Japanese magazine Best Car continues to stress that Lexus will have some help in building the successor to the LF-A. That help, apparently, will come from BMW . This rumor has been brewing for some time now, but if you really think about it, it’s hard to make any sense of it because Lexus and BMW BMW aren’t exactly bosom buddies. Sure, there’s a healthy amount of respect for the other brand, but at their core, the two consider the other as rivals.

Why would BMW help Lexus develop the new LF-A when it could compete directly with the i8 ? It just doesn’t make sense considering the lengths Lexus has taken in the past year to line up car after car to compete against German brands like BMW.

Maybe Best Car knows something that none of us do, which could explain why the magazine appears to be insisting that a BMW-Lexus collaboration is in the works. But call us skeptical on this rumor because we just don’t see the sense behind it.

Click past the jump to read more about the BMW i8 - BMW’s current supercar.

We all knew that this would happen eventually. The only question was when it was going to go down. Six months after Paul Walker and Roger Rodas lost their lives in a car crash involving the latter’s Porsche Carrera GT , Rodas’ wife, Kristine Rodas, has filed a lawsuit against Porsche claiming that the design of the rare supercar contributed to the high-speed accident that caused the car to go up in flames.

In her lawsuit, Rodas argued that the Carrera GT was, for all intents and purposes, unsafe for its intended use "by reason of defects in its manufacture, design, testing, component and constituents." Rodas also contends that her husband was driving the car at only 55 mph at the time of the accident, contrary to the Los Angeles County Sheriff department’s investigation , which found the accident to have been caused by speed with investigators estimating that Roger Rodas was driving at speeds between 80 to 93 mph before the crash.

Shortly after the crash, Porsche even sent its engineers to investigate the Carrera GT’s remains only to find that the car itself had no problems.

It’ll be interesting to see whether Kristine Rodas’ lawsuit against Porsche has a leg to stand on. We are by no means trivializing the situation and we’re not going to disrespect her for taking this step. We just don’t see her winning this suit based on the results of the police’s investigation.

Maybe Porsche will just avoid the whole thing with an out-of-court settlement. We don’t know if she’s going to accept those terms, but at this point, you might have to take what you can get.

Click past the jump to read more about Paul Walker’s crash.

Source: Sky News

The perks of being Jay Leno seemingly has no bounds these days. Whereas most of us would call it a lucky day just to own a car that has four wheels and takes us from point A to point B, Leno’s definition of a lucky day is finally receiving the McLaren P1 .

Oh, to be that guy.

In the latest episode of Jay Leno’s Garage, Leno finally gets his hands on his personal P1 and proceeds to make the rest of the auto world green with envy with his proclamation that he had already put "1,000 miles" on it. Care to give us a ride in that mighty machine, Jay?

But the real meat of the episode focused on his guest, Mike Flewitt, CEO of McLaren Automotive. Together, the two talked shop about McLaren Automotive’s history and the success the company has had since it first introduced the F1 a little over 20 years ago. From there, the discussion eventually moved to the P1, the company’s latest supercar that has pretty much exceeded all the expectations everyone has set on it since the time development began. He also tried to trick Flewitt into revealing the rumored 7-minute Nurburgring time of the P1.

Or as Leno puts it, the P1 has made even the most hardened of auto journalists "gush over it like school children." To that, we can’t argue with him.

Check out the rest of the episode as Jay takes his new P1 out for a drive on the streets of Los Angeles. Chances are, you’d be dying to ride shotgun by the time the episode’s over.

The M1 is one of the most iconic cars ever produced by BMW , and it was the model responsible for the M Division that creates all the cars we love today, like the M5 and the venerable M3 .

Fans of the Roundel brand have been clamoring for BMW to revive this epic nameplate and take on competitors like the Audi R8 and Mercedes SLS AMG for years now, but there has been little movement.

Rather, what we got was a new hybrid car that looks like an M1 called the i8 . While the i8 is an incredible piece of engineering, it is not a fire-breathing M car. But what if it could be?

At the recent launch of the M3 and M4 , CarAdvice asked M Division boss Friedrich Nitschke about the potential for this new car to spawn an M car. His response is encouraging.

When it comes to moving the advanced powertrain and lightweight carbon-fiber technology over to an M car, Nitschke said its a matter "capacity not a question of know-how." Basically, it would not be hard to move anything over, they just need approval from the higher ups in BMW. As it stands, the M Division is ready to make one, if the BMW board will green light the project.

Would you guys like to see a revived M1 in all its mid-engined glory?

Click past the jump to read more about the BMW M1.

Source: CarAdvice

Ferrari will have five new cars to release in the next five years. And that number doesn’t include special editions, one-offs or anything like that. Doesn’t that sound super amazing?!

Well it does sound cool, but the news is not as big as it sounds. Ferrari has been on a yearly update schedule for quite a while now. That is simply their main business plan. Every year we get a revised model, and every four years, that model gets a heavy update. So we had things like the 599 GTB that became the 599 GTO . For the current lineup, we got the California, then the 458 , the FF came after that, and now we have the F12 Berlinetta . Then the cycle began its repeat with this year’s California T , the first major refresh. Next year should see a faster, modified version of the 458 arrive.

Ferrari is also still enforcing its 7,000-car maximum production limit, so there won’t be any more available than there already are. I think the really big takeaway from the announcement was the fact that Ferrari said they are still exclusively using V-8 and V-12 engines. There were rumors of something like a forced induction V-6 in a potential 458 update, so those are now basically dead. Ferrari also is not going to heavily invest into hybrid systems until the tech reaches a level they deem satisfactory.

As cool as the announcement of a new lineup of Ferrari’s seems, it’s actually just business as usual.

But what if Ferrari didn’t do business as usual? What if Ferrari decided it wanted to dramatically increase sales, and didn’t care so much about its brand prestige and message? It worked wonders for Porsche with models like the Cayenne .

Hit the break to see our self-destructing, five-year Ferrari plan; brand prestige be damned.


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