Toyota Supra

Toyota Supra

Posted on by Nico DeMattia  

Gran Turismo 6 is a car enthusiast’s dream. What GT6, or any Gran Turismo for that matter, offers is a chance to get as close as possible to the cars we love that we can’t drive in the real world. This is especially true for concept cars. Most concept cars never make it to production, and when they do, they usually end up resembling so little of the concept that it turns out to be a disappointment. Concept cars always look so much better than production cars because the design team has no boundaries or regulations to follow. The FT-1 is no different, as it simply looks fantastic. It was next to the Mercedes-Benz stand at the NYIAS and it stole most of the show-goers away from the German automaker’s. So when GT6 and Toyota announced that they would be making an FT-1 for the new game new game, with a 30 second teaser video, it obviously got all of us excited. It’s called the FT-1 Vision GT Concept, and it looks spectacular with it’s scoops, louvers and all that exposed carbon fiber. Let’s hope it drives as well as it looks, digitally of course.

Updated 08/14/2014: Toyota unveiled the official details and images on the FT-1 Vision Gran Turismo Concept set to be offered for Gran Turismo 6 users from September. Details after the jump.

Click past the jump to read more about the Toyota FT-1 Vision GT Concept.

The return of the Toyota Supra is inching closer and closer to reality. You probably can’t tell by reading this, but you can imagine us doing our happy dance now that more details about the sports car are coming to light. MotorTrend has the latest on the Toyota -BMW collaboration and sources close to Toyota have told the auto site that the all-new Supra will be a plug-in hybrid.

We’re not surprised about this news, especially in today’s world where hybrid technology has become universally embraced within the industry. MotorTrend’s sources also indicated that the new Supra will use a BMW-sourced, turbocharged, 2.0-liter, four-cylinder engine. This powertrain will then be combined with the Japanese automaker’s new super-conductor hybrid technology.

This kind of setup isn’t exactly new to Toyota, as the company has already tinkered with a similar package on the Yaris Hybrid R Concept that was first introduced at the 2013 Frankfurt Motor Show . Toyota even took it a step further when it used this system in the TS040 Hybrid race car at the 24 Hours of Le Mans last month.

So what does this all mean for the new Supra? For one, it’s going to be vastly different from its predecessor, which featured a turbocharged, 3.0-liter engine the last time we saw it. That model was good for 320 horsepower and 315 pound-feet of torque. This time around, the new Supra’s hybrid engine is expected to be slightly more powerful, with an estimated output of somewhere north of 400 horsepower.

It’s not that big of an increase but the improved efficiency should do wonders in making the Supra a more pleasurable ride.

Click past the jump to read more about the BMW-Toyota sports car.

Source: MotorTrend

The news about Toyota and BMW building cars together isn’t new, as the two companies finalized the partnership in January of 2013, but thanks to the Nikkei Asian Review, we’ve got some rumors as to what the two companies have been working on. Those plans revolve around the next-generation BMW Z4 and a revival of the famed Toyota Supra .

The Nikkei reports the two cars will share the same platform, manufacturing processes, and parts procurements. The two sports cars , however, won’t be sharing the same body style and will be sold under their respective brands. What’s more, these two cars could debut as early as 2017.

The report speculates whether Toyota would be able to adopt the same carbon-fiber-extensive construction style BMW has recently adopted, citing cost as the limiting factor. However, with the falling cost of carbon fiber and its exploding popularity, the material might be within Toyota’s reach. This is especially true for such a specialized sports car as the Supra.

The Nikkei report lacks further juicy details about the partnership or its planed products, but news seems rather certain. The 2017 date is still tentative, but the possibility still remains.

As far as powertrains, it’s anybody’s guess as to what will be found under hood. Perhaps BMW will provide a TwinPower, inline six-cylinder or maybe each automaker will supply its own powerplants. Only time will tell. One thing is for sure, with BMW and Toyota partnered together, the future looks bright with the addition of two exciting sports cars.

Click past the jump to read more about the future Supra and the current Z4

The Toyota Supra was designed to be a sporting machine that could compete with many of the major powerhouses of the day , but it wasn’t until the fourth generation Supra bowed in 1993, that the car gained its status as one of the all-time greats.

It featured an all-new exterior design that was more aerodynamic and much sportier looking than its predecessor. Gone were the sharp edges and pop-up headlamps to be replaced with long smooth curves. Along with the new look, the car also went on a diet losing 200 pounds or more, depending on the trim level.

As is the case with almost all major changes, fans of the car were worried Toyota was softening the intentions of the car. That was until they turned the key on the new drivetrains. While everyone thought Toyota was creating a friendlier, slower Supra, what it actually created was a supercar -eating monster that would grow into a cult icon.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1993 - 1998 Toyota Supra.

When the third-generation Toyota Supra made its debut, it came with a lot of firsts for the model. The most important was Toyota’s decision to finally develop the Supra as its own stand-alone sports car , free from any tie-ups between the Celica . It was a risk that Toyota took because the Supra had become so successful that it finally needed to stand on its own four wheels and shine. In addition to that, the third generation was also the first time that Supra didn’t come in the full-on fastback look that the first two generations did. While still retaining some of the basic design, the third-gen Supra’s length was cut by 1.6 inches but was wider by an inch, making for a stouter appearance than its elongated predecessors.

An oft-overlooked fact about the third-generation Supra is that Toyota initially slated it for release in the early 1986 model year, but production delays pushed it back to May 1986. This meant that there were actually two wholly different Supras available in the same model year, so the MK III Supra used the 1986.5 model year designation for clarity.

It was with the third-generation model that the world finally started to recognize the Supra was one of Toyota’s best works. The version lasted for a little over five years, quickly becoming one of the most sought-after Japanese sports cars in the market at that time.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1986.5 - 1992 Toyota Supra.

**Note** Our software does not recognize half model years, so please do not hate us in the comments because we listed this as a "1986" model in the title.

The relative success of the first-generation Supra left Toyota with a huge task on its hands. It wasn’t enough to just build on the popularity of the sports car ; the company had to exceed it with the new version. So in a lot of ways, the second-generation Supra was created to make sure that it wasn’t a flash-in-the-pan model.

The model ran from 1982 to 1986 and in that time, the Supra evolved and underwent a handful of changes, resulting in the model that cemented the Supra’s place in history as one of Toyota’s finest sports cars .

In the North American market, the second generation Supra, which was still known as the Celica XX in Japan, came in two different versions: Performance Type (P-Type) and Luxury Type (L-Type). Both versions were roughly identical to each other, except for some noticeable changes to the aesthetics and the available technology contained in the models.

The success of the second-generation Toyota Supra turned a lot of people into fans of the sports car, elevating its stature in the eyes of many as one of the best sports cars of its time. It even caught the attention of Motor Trend and Car and Driver, two magazines that awarded the Supra with their own honors, including MT’s "Import Car of the Year" and Car and Driver’s "Top Ten Best List" in 1983 and 1984.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1982 - 1986 Toyota Supra.

Back in the the 1970’s, the Celica was fighting the good sports car fight for Toyota as rival models, particularly the Nissan 240Z , burst into the scene. But it wasn’t until the latter part of that decade when Toyota decided to ramp up its efforts in the sports car market. That’s when the Toyota Supra was born. Based on the Celica until its third incarnation, the Supra became the sports car Toyota put up against some of the best its rivals had to offer. It’s popularity grew to such great lengths that the Japanese automaker even created a new logo just for the Supra.

The Toyota Supra may no longer exist and even with reports of its revival bubbling in the surface for years now, we can always look fondly at the first-generation Supra and say "that’s where it all began."

Click past the jump to read more about the 1979 - 1981 Toyota Supra.

Have you noticed how most Toyotas are boring by design, while the company’s concept cars are usually groundbreaking and spectacular? Here, have a look at the 2014 Toyota FCV concept and then take a peek at the Camry sedan . See what I mean?

Well, this enormous concept-to-production gap might be narrowed in the near future, as the Japanese manufacturer is one step away from reviving the iconic Supra nameplate with the FT-1 concept as its base (have another look at our recent renderings for a refresh).

Of course, we’re not expecting Toyota to make the production car as mean looking and aggressive as the aforementioned design study, but the final result is bound to have a big impact on the industry. It might as well be the next Lexus LFA , but with a Toyota badge on its nose and with a greater "wow" factor attached to it. And the LFA is hard to beat!

Now I know all of you sports car enthusiasts are just dying to see this new product alive and kicking, but you’ll have to keep your shirts on for a little while longer, as Toyota has yet to reveal its plans with the next Supra.

Meanwhile, the stunning FT-1 concept took a trip across town from the Calty Design Research workshop to Jay Leno’s Garage , where California’s biggest car collector sat down and had a chat with two of the main men behind the project.

Leno is obviously impressed with the FT-1’s design, claiming the new concept car could spawn something truly impressive. Unfortunately, he doesn’t get to drive it, as he does with most of the vehicles that drop by his garage, for obvious reasons, but the video reveals some interesting facts about the car.

Now go ahead and enjoy the video and make sure you stay tuned to TopSpeed for more info on the upcoming Toyota Supra.

When Toyota launched its FT-1 concept , the entire industry stood up and took notice of this new sports car . After further investigation, nearly all of us media folk drew a direct line between the new concept and the eventual return of the legendary Supra . We took the initiative to create a rendering of an FT-1-based Supra back in February, and what good is a new supra without the removable targa top that the model was known for having? So we are now adding a rendering of the convertible Supra to our repertoire today.

Once we created the coupe version of the our Supra rendering, the convertible version was pretty simple. All we needed to do was eliminate the center section of the roof, flatten out the rear section of the roof and add a frame just above the windshield. We also had to take some time to add in some seats to give it a more realistic look.

Just like with the coupe version of the Supra, converting the convertible model required revising the nose to lose that wild, F1 -like nose, add more traditional headlights, smoothen out some of the air intakes and add on a more Supra-like rear spoiler.

I suspect that the convertible version will arrive about a year after the Supra coupe.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2016 Toyota Supra Convertible.

Toyota Supra

That’s right. On February 10th, Toyota filed the name “Supra ” with the United States Patent and Trademark office, all but spelling out the conformation the sports car is headed back into production. Although Toyota hasn’t admitted it yet, the FT-1 concept seen at the Detroit Auto Show will likely be the staring place for the upcoming Supra. Above is our artist’s rendering of what we expect to see adapted from the original concept.

The newly re-registered Supra name will find itself attached to a front-engine, rear-wheel-drive sports car that is likely powered by two drivetrains: a turbocharged I-4 in the base model and a 2.5-liter V-6 sporting hybrid technology that generates some 400 horsepower.

The reviving of the Supra represents Toyota’s return into the sports car category — a field it hasn’t played in since the Celica and MR2 last saw production in 2005 and 2007, respectively.

There is no official word on when (or technically if) the Supra will make its debut. Pricing is still undetermined, but expect it to fall just above the Scion FR-S ’s $25,000 base MSRP.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Toyota Supra.


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