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  Car Videos. have fun watching

You may have missed out on the worldwide debut of the fourth-generation Mazda MX-5 back on September 3rd, but to be honest, you didn’t miss out on anything substantial. Sure, the car was paraded in front of a crowd and through live streaming, but other than being treated to an endless loop of 80’s hits, the reveal was nothing short of confusing.

So I’m guessing that Mazda’s making some type amends with the release of this video, which is an extended recap of what happened during the unveiling of the car.

You’re going to see a lot of Mazda design director Derek Jenkins talking about the MX-5 Miata. There are even some camera angles that weren’t available during the live reveal, showcasing the MX-5 in a variety of angles that we didn’t get to see before.

If you labored through the MX-5’s launch, this video gives you a fresh take that you can appreciate. But if you missed the debut, it’s even more important to watch this video and see for yourself the day when the fourth-generation MX-5 Miata was revealed to the world.

I’m still a little peeved about the lack of details from the launch, but I do appreciate Mazda trying to make up for it.

We’re all familiar with today’s Caterham Seven or the Lotus -badged, simpler sports car that preceded it. It’s a pure driver’s car suitable for both public roads and tracks, although it’s not exactly the vehicle you’d want to drive to work on a daily basis. However, if you need a no-nonsense sports car in your life, you can’t go wrong with the Seven.

You can have anything from a Suzuki -sourced, 660cc to a 2.0-liter Duratec engine under the hood. That gives it an output range from 80 ponies for street cruising to as much as 311 horsepower for quick laps around the track. Sure, 311 horses is quite a lot for a vehicle that weighs only 1,147 pounds, but the power-to-weight ratio can get even more ridiculous than that. All you have to do is head to Donkervoort, the Dutch shop that has been manufacturing its Seven-based sports cars since 1978.

Its latest creation, the D8 GTO, is unlike anything Donkervoort ever built. Sure, it resembles its predecessors, but things are completely different when it comes to the GTO’s shell and powerplant. Unlike other D8s, which came with either Ford or Audi four-bangers, the GTO comes with Ingolstadt’s famed 2.5-liter, five-cylinder engine. Output ranges between 340 and 380 horsepower, more than anything Caterham has delivered so far. As if that wasn’t enough, the D8 GTO received a full carbon-fiber body that results in an insane 1,543-pound curb weight. This end is a power-to-weight ratio that rivals the initial Bugatti Veyron’s ratio. I’m talking about a supercar motivated by 987 ponies; is this amazing or what?

So how does a D8 GTO look, sound and run? You can find out in XCAR’s comprehensive review in the above video . Make sure you don’t miss it, you won’t be seeing one of these monsters on U.S. streets anytime soon.

Sometimes you just need a manual transmission to row. That’s how our friend Chris Harris feels before he hops in two of the last manual-transmission track cars still around, the older 997 Porsche GT3 RS and the famed 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 .

A rain-soaked racetrack nestled in the rolling English countryside provides the playground, and despite the standing water, the two cars stay planted on the tarmac. Sure, Harris has plenty of sideways action, but it seems nothing was unplanned.

The point of this little track test, according to Harris, isn’t to compare the Z/28 and GT3 RS side-by-side, but to just have fun rowing gears in a proper sports car — something our host isn’t used to saying in regards to a Camaro . Nevertheless, the Z/28’s engine with its high-tech internals and 7,000-rpm redline, provides plenty of fun. Its 305-series tires provide enough grip around the wet track to keep the 3,800-pound car from sliding into the wall.

Manual transmission-equipped sports cars are becoming less and less popular, as the performance numbers provided by these new flap-paddle gearboxes outdo those of the manual and as fewer people know how to drive stick. While it’s probable most folks looking to buy a hyped-up sports car know how to do the three-pedal dance, it’s undeniable that dual-clutch automatics are faster around a track.

But that begs the question; is speed everything, or is the connection and experience with the car worth more? Let us know what you think in the comments.

The 2015 Cadillac Escalade is one of largest and boxiest full-size SUVs nowadays. I’m not saying it is not stylish, but that thing is huge, heavy and seemingly slow, but once its 420-horsepower V-8 comes to life, the Escalade is anything but slow. In fact, it takes only 6.4 seconds to charge from naught to 60 mph, which is faster than a Subaru BRZ or Scion FR-S , and it reaches the end of a quarter-mile strip in 14.8 seconds.

On the other hand, we know that some potential buyers would like the 2015 Escalade to be a tad quicker. This is where Hennessey Performance and its HPE550 package comes in. The upgrade places a supercharger atop the 6.2-liter V-8 and adds performance-enhancing parts, including a high-flow intercooling system. The result? Output goes up to a whopping 552 ponies and 565 pound-feet of torque, while it 0-to-60-mph drops to 4.9 seconds. Although the Texas-based company hasn’t released quarter-mile figures yet, it’s safe to assume the Escalade HPE550 is in the low 13-second range.

One thing’s for sure, the supercharged Escalade is definitely faster than a base model, and the video above proves just that. Hit the play button to find out why Hennessey charges a $15,950 premium to tweak the 2015 Escalade.

We already know everything there is to know about the Porsche 918 Spyder and we all agree its Stuttgart’s finest piece of engineering yet. That’s why we can’t get enough of this V-8-powered hybrid and drool over any 918 Spyder-related footage we lay our eyes upon. This time around, there’s no test drive or quarter-mile race, but a 0-to-207 mph run that puts the German supercar within four mph of its claimed top speed. What’s really impressive is that the 918 Spyder takes only 29 seconds to charge to 207 mph from a standing start, yet another benchmark added to its staggering performance credentials, which include a 0-to-60-mph time of only 2.8 seconds.

As a brief reminder, Porsche’s latest supercar is powered by a 4.6-liter, V-8 engine connected to two electric motors. The combo cranks out 887 horsepower and an amazing 940 pound-feet of torque. This drivertrain may generate less horsepower than those fitted in the Ferrari LaFerrari and the McLaren P1 , but make no mistakes, the 918 Spyder is just as fast.

If you need further proof, Sport Auto’s video above is enough to showcase the 918’s capabilities when the hammer falls on the gas pedal.

Hit the play button to enjoy the speed and the roar of that incredible V-8 engine!

Hennessey Performance and the nation-wide automotive dealer AutoNation have recently announced their alliance in bringing Hennessey Hennessey Performance parts to the masses through AutoNation’s extensive dealer network. That means you can walk into your local AutoNation Chevrolet dealer and order a Hennessey upgrade to your vehicle, so long as Hennessey makes a kit for it.

Kicking off this new partnership, Hennessey outfitted a Chevy Silverado crew cab with its HPE550 Supercharger kit and hooked a flatbed trailer to its hitch. Riding along is a Corvette Stingray convertible with Hennessey’s HPE650 Supercharger . As the supercharger names suggest, the Silverado now makes 550 horsepower and the Vette puts out an impressive 650.

What we see in the video above is the pair getting their modifications in preparation for their nationwide tour. Yep, starting this month, Hennessey will be touring the country, going from one AutoNation dealer to the next, showcasing the performance advantages of its engine upgrades. Demonstration rides will be given and burnouts will likely happen.

Chevy buyers will be able to outfit not only the Corvette and Silverado with Hennessey’s wares, but also the SS , Camaro , Tahoe , and Suburban .

Once this Chevrolet tour is over in approximately 12 months, Hennessey will begin the same process with AutoNation Ford dealerships; showcasing Hennessey’s soon-to-be finished upgrades for the new 2015 Ford lineup. That includes the new Mustang and F-150 .

Sabine Schmitz is a name you might recognize; she is a professional driver who is referred to by many as the “Queen of the ‘Ring.” She was one of the first head drivers of the Nurburgring taxi service, and if you have ever watched Top Gear, she is the excitable young German lady that took a Ford Transit van around the Green Hell in Series 6. She also hosts German automotive television show, D Motor. To say she knows cars is quite an understatement, and that is what makes this video so interesting. Sabine owns a 997-generation 911 GT3 that she has driven for more than 12,000 miles on the Nurburgring alone, and she is set to compare it to the all-new 991-generation 911 GT3 . You know, the one that Porsche stopped selling because it caught on fire.

With Sabine’s intimate knowledge of the older GT3, it is really interesting to hear her take on the new car. She has the ability to really pick out the subtle things that make each car feel and perform differently. Now this is only a short performance test and drive time on a closed airfield, not a blast down the Nordschliefe, so Sabine can only say so much about the way the car drives, but she still seems impressed.

Click play to watch Sabine beat on both her personal 911, the new 911 , and as a bonus you get to hear lots of angry Porsche flat-six wail as she drags both cars screaming to their redlines. It a glorious thing, so turn that volume up.

It’s no secret that carbon fiber is one of the latest breakthrough materials that provides a high-strength, low-weight solution to nearly any problem. Today it is used in making body panels, support bracing, and even entire monocoque chassis. But now, companies are developing complete one-piece carbon-fiber wheels. Jay Leno takes a look at Carbon Revolution, a company that is on the brink of releasing its carbon-fiber wheels to the marketplace, including to an undisclosed OEM automaker. Yep, soon we’ll see a mainstream automaker release a vehicle rolling on a set of carbon-fiber wheels.

Brett Gass, Executive Director for Carbon Revolution stopped by Jay’s garage to show off the new wheels. Weighing in at roughly 15 pounds, the carbon-fiber wheels weigh an average of five pounds less than a set of lightweight aluminum wheels normally found of today’s sports cars. Gass also elaborates on how his wheel is certified by the German government to pass all safety and strength requirements.

To test the wheels, Jay, Gass, and a group of friends head out to Willow Springs Raceway in a 2008 Porsche 911 GT3 RS . Besides a sideways slip into the dirt by Jay, the carbon fiber-shod Porsche holds the road. The group of guys talk about how standard, lightweight aluminum wheels flex, while the carbon-fiber rims don’t. The premise seems a little far-fetched to me that a novice driver in a borrowed car can feel the aluminum wheels flex, though I don’t doubt the benefits of lighter wheels. Either way, it’s an interesting look at the future of wheel design and construction.

Liveries and sponsors are an important part of motorsport. No wonder certain models are best recognized when wearing the colors of Martini, Gulf Oil or even Coca Cola. Take Porsche for instance; the Germans have scored some of their most important racing wins while wrapped in Martini, Gulf and Rothmans liveries. The 911 , 935 , 936, 956 and the 962 are all related to these brands. But there’s a certain livery that’s often overlooked when it comes to Porsche. The white, red and blue of Brumos Racing , a team established by Peter Gregg in Florida, in 1971.

A race driver himself, Gregg took on the IMSA GT Championship with sponsorship from Brumos Porsche, a dealerships that had been importing rear-engined sports car into America since 1959. Granted, Brumos never reached the heights of the Gulf- and Rothmans-sponsored Porsches, but it did win the 24 Hours of Daytona four times. Its first success dates back to 1973, while the most recent win occurred in 2009. Brumos’ career also includes appearances in the Can-Am series with the incredibly fast 917. Although the company folded in 2013, its white cars adorned by red and blue stripes remained iconic figures among endurance racing aficionados.

To honor Brumos Porsche and its successful track record, the Germans launched a special-edition 911 Carrera GTS in 2012. Dubbed B59, it consisted of only five bespoke units that came in Carrara White with the famous Brumos stripe design. These sports cars also payed tribute to Hurley Haywood, who raced Porsches for around 20 years and played a big part in Brumos’ success. All five were delivered to the United States, where they found homes in collectors’ and Brumos enthusiasts’ garages. Some keep them alongside other Porsches, while others store them in garages that also include British vehicles and pure American muscle cars .

They all share a common passion that has been captured brilliantly in the video above. Hit the play button to meet the owners and the story behind Brumos and Hurley Haywood.

On paper, this may seem like a very silly race. A “low-level” supercar in the McLaren 650S , a hybrid Porsche 918 and an ultra-exotic Koenigsegg Agera R with a top speed of more than 250 mph all lined up for a drag race. Who will win? Obviously since we are interested in this at all, the results will be surprising.

For once I am going to go ahead and spoil things for you by saying that the 918 wins. It may not have a top speed anywhere near the Agera R’s, but thanks to that instant electric torque and AWD, it launches from the line like a rocket. The real interesting story is the McLaren 650S. Considering it is the cheapest and slowest McLaren you can currently buy, it has no place in this fight, but it holds its own surprisingly well.

It just goes to show that even the slowest of the supercars are blindingly quick, especially over short distances in a straight line. Press that little play button to get an eyeful of horsepower, as there are about 2500 raging ponies between these three pieces of metal and carbon fiber. There is also a good bit of roaring exhaust noise, but sadly the quality isn’t the best, so don’t worry about cranking the volume too high on this one.

Why do you think the McLaren did so well in this race? Is the Agera being driven by a rookie? Does the 650S have more power than McLaren says? I want to read your opinions in the comments. As always, I’ll come back later and comment on what you guys said.


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