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Traveling at high speeds involves some pretty scary physics. That’s why the Bloodhound SSC project has been in the works for nearly five years and involves some of the brightest engineers from around the globe. The latest video to come from the British project shows the level of testing undergone for a single part, in this case, the wheel.

See, the Bloodhound SSC is a supersonic car designed for solely for breaking the 1,000-mph speed barrier. The ‘car’ is powered by a jet engine and rockets to achieve such a fast velocity. At 1,100 mph, the Bloodhound’s 35.5-inch (902.6-mm) aluminum wheels spin at a whopping 10,429 rpm. That’s 174 rotations per second!

At that speed, the wheel’s diameter expands by 1.6 mm (0.62 inches) and its temperature starts to rise. In fact, during testing the wheel started to heat up at the rate of two degrees Fahrenheit per second due to aerodynamic friction. At its max, the wheel peaked at 204 degrees Fahrenheit, only 100 degrees shy of aluminum becoming soft.

The Bloodhound SSC team is continuing to work throughout the year with hopes of breaking the 1,100-mph land-speed at a location in South Africa.

There was a time when Ferrari dominated sports car racing . It happened until about 50 years ago, right before Ford had introduced the Le Mans-winning GT40 and Porsche dominated the tracks with the iconic 917 . Two years after the latter began dominating endurance events, Ferrari had abandoned sports car racing to focus on Formula One. It was 1973, and the Ferrari 312PB had retired as the company’s last prototype racer.

Although eclipsed by many racers of the day, the 312PB managed to achieve 15 wins in 72 events. Powered by a flat-12 engine based on the 3.0-liter Formula One unit, the Italian sports car made a name for itself by winning prestigious events. Its trophy case includes the 1000km Buenos Aires, Daytona 6 Hours, Sebring 12 Hours, 1000km Nurburgring , and the Targa Florio, among others. The list of drivers that hopped in its cockpit is equally impressive and features the likes of Jacky Ickx, Brian Redman, Ronnie Peterson and Mario Andretti. That’s a lineup full of skilled and race-winning aces right there.

Sure, it’s not the most beautiful Ferrari ever built, but the 312PB was not conceived to win beauty contests. It’s main goal was to win races and, for the most part, it succeeded. It was renowned for its precise handling and quickly became a crowd pleaser due to its piercing exhaust note. Thankfully enough, some of the few 312PBs ever built have been stored and maintained for the past 40 years, so we can see and hear them race once again. Thanks to Petrolicious and Steven Read, we can do that at the push of button. Just hit play and don’t be shy with the volume, you’re in for a real treat.

Every now and again, we’re reminded of just how fun driving can be. Simple, purpose-built cars are often the best way of getting this reminder. The Alfa Romeo 4C is one of those cars. Its light curb weight and moderate power means its power to weight ratio is sublime. Its sport exhaust is missing a muffler but possesses a seductive roar. Its manual steering communicates every ripple in the road. These types of vehicles don’t come around too often at an affordable price, but somehow, Alfa has done it.

In the video above, MotorTrend’s Carlos Lago takes the 4C out for track testing and spirited cruising long the Pacific Coast Highway. The 4C posted some pretty respectable numbers at the track, as 60 mph came in 4.1 seconds and the quarter mile happened in 12.7 seconds at 106.7 mph. It also held an impressive 0.94 g of lateral acceleration and stopping from 60 mph took a mere 97 feet. Those numbers come darn close to supercar stats, especially considering the 4C’s starting price of just $55,195 and its 1.7-liter, turbocharged inline-four is only producing 237 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque.

Even more impressive is the 4C’s fun factor. Its loud exhaust and quick-shifting six-speed twin-clutch transmission make for a thrilling ride. Add to that its mid-mounted engine location and curb weight of only 2,437 pounds and you’ve got a recipe for perfection.

We subscribe to the school of thought that if you do something long enough, you’re bound to become good at it. Chris Harris has driven cars for a long time, so presumably, he’s also done a lot of drifting in these cars. We’re inclined to believe that holds true, especially because we enjoyed his little instructional video on how to properly drift the BMW M235i .

Chris is taking his talents back to YouTube as part of the reinvented Drive channel. What better way to do get the ball rolling (again) than teaching viewers the art of drifting the M235i . This actually isn’t the first time Harris has done something like this.
He once taped a similar instructional guide to the drifting using his own M5 so this should be right in his wheelhouse. The video itself is almost 12 minutes long, so if you want to take some notes, now’s a good time to get the pen and paper ready.

Like every Harris video, it’s every bit as fun from the start as it is at the end. Who knows, you might even learn a thing or two about drifting vehicles in general.

America has taken the Nurburgring track by storm this summer. Not only is Ford testing the upcoming Mustang SVT , but Cadillac too went to Germany to put the hotter, V-badged versions of the CTS and ATS through their paces. We’ve already seen the beefed-up sedans smoke their tires around Nordschleife, thanks to our skilled spy photographers, while video footage showed the ATS-V is fast enough for some rally-like jumping.

Thanks to TouriClips, who spends and awful lot of time on the "Green Hell" (and we’re thankful for that), we can now have a better look at the CTS-V too. Our previous spy shots indicated that the sedan felt quite cozy on the ’Ring, and the video comes to prove we weren’t just whistling dixie. The CTS-V looks planted and composed through the track’s corners, suggesting that the extra power stuffed under the hood comes with a great deal of chassis updates and precise handling.

Although the high-performance sedan is still hidden under swirly camouflage, the footage hints there’s a whining, supercharged engine between the front wheels. This can only mean the CTS-V will be launched with the same 6.2-liter, V-8 powerplant fitted in the 2015 Corvette Z06 . Previous reports suggested Cadillac could use a twin-turbo, 4.5-liter V-8, but that scenario seems less likely. Hit the play button and leave your thoughts in the comments section.

The Toyota GT 86 may have lost some of its appeal since arriving in 2012, but it’s still capable of making the right kind of headlines. One of those times arrived when German driver Harald Muller set a world record for the longest drift. His car of choice? A specially prepared Toyota GT 86.

The record-breaking attempt happened in Samsun, Turkey on July 15th. During the event, Muller was able to drift the GT 86 a grand total of 89.55 miles, shattering the previous record of 51.278 miles set last year by BMW Performance Center instructor Jeff Schwartz. Muller’s performance is pretty incredible, one that was made even more impressive when you consider that he completed 612 laps in a somewhat continuous drift. The feat also took 2 hours, 25 minutes and 18 seconds, which is a pretty long time to go around in circles without even taking so much as a water break in between.

It’s a pretty cool feat even though it seemed like the GT 86 appeared to lose momentum on a couple of occasions. But hey, a record’s a record and Muller’s performance was good enough to receive the Guinness Book of World Record’s stamp of approval. Harald Muller now holds the record for longest drift, setting a new benchmark that a lot of drifters will probably try to break in the near future.

Production of the Ford GT may have ended in 2006, but the American supercar is still roaming the streets and charging the tracks in 2014. After many successful racing seasons throughout its production years and after, the race-spec GT is still alive and kicking, thanks to a number of companies, with one of them being Lambda Performance.

Still racing GT3-spec versions of the Ford GT, the German outfit had a successful ADAC GT Masters campaign in 2013, when it won three events. The Ford GT faced stiff competition from newer vehicles like the Corvette Z06.R , the Porsche 911 GT3 and the Audi R8 LMS Ultra , and famous teams such as Callaway , Abt and Phoenix Racing.

To achieve these impressive results, Lambda performed many modifications to the GT, consisting of an updated, race-spec gearbox, an in-house designed air box, an updated suspension, some electronic mods and new wheels. A Lambda, design aerodynamic package was also fitted, while the stock, supercharged, 5.4-liter V-8 was replaced by a race-optimized unit. Naturally, Lambda used a Roush Yates, 5.3-liter V-8, a mill that has a proven racing record to its name and generates 575 horsepower in the Ford GT.

Although Lambda Performance is no longer racing in the ADAC GT Masters as of the 2014 season, its GT GT3 remains an awesome track machine. Its unique appearance and distinguished sound are surely missed in Germany and the video above comes to show you why. Can you name a race car that sounds as enthralling as the Ford GT? The comments section is all yours.

BMW’s teaser showing what appeared to be a high-performance version of the 2 Series coupe turned out to be nothing more than an M235i , and not the M2 we were hoping. Fortunately, the photo was actually previewing a two-minute video showing BMW’s latest driftmob in Cape Town, South Africa. What’s a driftmob, you may ask? Well, it basically consists of several vehicles, in this case M235i coupes, drifting together based on a specific, preset scenario.

For this epic driftmob, BMW also brought together some of the best drifters in the world, including world champion Rhys Millen and the likes of Rich Rutherford, Samuel Hubinette, Conrad Grunewald and Daijiro Yoshihara. The result is about 90 seconds of tail-happy BMWs burning their tires in a roundabout. Not only that, but the coupes dance together with the utmost precision in a performance worthy of an automotive Oscar.

Furthermore, the footage shows just how what an awesome machine the M235i is, although some modifications were required for the scene. The DSC was turned off and the handbrake and gearshift levers were optimized for easier control, but that doesn’t mean the M235i is less drifty in standard guise. However, you shouldn’t try this on public roads, but rather test your skills on a race track or traffic-free road course.

Click past the jump to watch two more videos.

You know what’s more impressive than hearing the acceleration of the Lamborghini Huracan ? Hearing two of them. But you know what’s better than hearing two Huracans accelerating? Hearing 13 of them. Yep. 13 Lamborghini Huracan supercars taking turns stretching their legs in Lamborghini’s Sant’Agata Bolognese headquarters. This video comes courtesy of YouTube user “NM2255,” who looks to have spent a great deal of time camping outside Lambo’s Italian base just to see the Huracans in action.

Not only was he lucky enough to see one Huracan, he saw 13 of them in different colors. Some of the models came with wraps on the front end, which made us wonder if Lamborghini’s already preparing a different version of the Huracan or if these were simply for protection? We don’t know that at this point, but what we do know is that the Huracan is looking more and more like a worthy successor to the Lamborghini Gallardo .

It already has the look and spirit of a true Raging Bull and it’s got a 5.2-liter, V-10 engine that produces an impressive 602 horsepower and 412 pound-feet of torque.

Just by watching NM2255’s video, you can immediately tell that the Huracan is everything it’s been hyped up to be, and then some. It’s no longer an exaggeration to believe that Lamborghini’s new baby is poised to take the popularity of the Gallardo and bring it to a new level.

A mysterious Audi SUV was recently spotted doing some runs on the Nurburgring . The sheer size of the vehicle suggests that this model could be the second generation Q7 . However, a recent confirmation from an Audi executive seems to indicate that this is not just an ordinary Q7, but the SQ7 that is scheduled to be released in 2016.

So why do we think that it’s the SQ7? It’s a little hard to catch but if you look closely, you’ll notice that it has a quad-pipe exhaust system instead of the dual-pipe setup on the standard Q7.

Audi board member for technical development Ulrich Hackenberg has already confirmed to Autocar that the new Q7 will arrive next year. He also added that a more powerful SQ7 will come a year later. This spy video is the first indication that the car is right smack in the middle of development in time for its scheduled launch in 2016.

We don’t expect a whole lot aesthetic changes between the Q7 and the SQ7. But we do expect the latter to feature a completely different powertrain that could make use of a “supplemental electric charger” that will be used with a 3.0-liter, turbocharged, V-6 TDI engine and a lithium-ion battery.

Audi has already previewed this powertrain on a couple of concepts: the A6 TDI Concept and the RS 5 TDI-e Concept . The two concepts actually carried different iterations of this new powertrain technology. The A6 TDI used an electrically driven turbo combined with a single exhaust gas-driven turbocharger, whereas the RS 5 TDI used used a sequential twin-turbo system with a large and small turbocharger.

It remains to be seen what kind of engine configuration the SQ7 will carry but don’t be surprised if its hybrid system generates a little more than 370 horsepower and 516 pound-feet of torque output of the rumored Q7 e-Tron.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2016 Audi SQ7.


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