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We’ve told you about Jaguar’s race-ready F-Type Project 7 before, but now thanks to Justin Bell we are getting a glimpse of what the car is really all about. Jaguar built the Project 7 to celebrate its racing heritage that dates back to the 1950s when the D-Type won LeMons three times. After the success of the D-Type, Jaguar created the E-Type and brought beauty to the scene in the 1960s. Between the two cars, Jaguar’s catapult into the history books was solidified.

Unfortunately the world had to wait some 50 years before Jaguar produced vehicle that matched the D-Type and E-Type’s reputation and beauty. The new-for-2013 F-Type has shaken the brand’s dusty image and brought back the iconic status of its vehicles. The new F-Type is a formidable car on the open road and track, making everyone take notice.

Jaguar was kind enough to give Justin Bell and the MotorTrend team the keys to this early Project 7 example just before the 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance . Bell stretches the Jaguar’s legs at the Mazda Laguna Seca raceway and along the California coastline, though at a very leisurely pace.

The Project 7 represents an awe-inspiring iteration of the current F-Type that harks back to the glory days of Jaguar racing. Its sharp paint scheme and is matched by the added carbon fiber front splitter, rear diffuser, and large rear wing. Even more so is the shapely cowl just aft of the driver’s head. Under the Project 7’s hood lies the same supercharged 5.0-liter V-8, but its output has been increased to 567 horsepower and 502 pound-feet of torque. The eight-speed automatic does the shifting.

Based on a car that is the successor to the legendary E-Type, and built as an homage to the incredible D-Type, Jaguar’s Project 7 is truly a thing of beauty.

We all know how awesome the Challenger Hellcat is. We also know that thanks to its 707 horsepower supercharged V-8 it has some issues with traction. So what happens if you find yourself out and about with a Hellcat, and the heavens have poured gallons of the wet stuff onto the roadways? Well if this new video from /Drive is anything to go by, you will be very sideways and you will giggle a lot.

At the recent launch for Dodge’s new performance darling, they brought all the journalists to Portland, Oregon, where it rains — a lot. What ends up happening is a lot of track time on a soaked surface. Matt Farah is our wheelman for this episode and he spends lots of time in a drift, and lots of time with a smile on his face.

If you are like me and you love to see to top-notch hooligan antics, just go ahead and hit that play button. Don’t forget to turn that volume up; the engine audio in this video is particularly good, and you get lots of that deep grumble and lovely supercharger whine.

Enjoy.

Anybody who has ever played Gran Turismo owes a lot of debt of gratitude to creator Kazunori Yamauchi, the architect behind the game’s birth and breath-taking fifteen-year evolution. Now you have a chance to do so by watching the full-length video of the Gran Turismo documentary “Kaz: Pushing the Virtual Divide”.

Last year, Gran Turismo announced the documentary as an inside look at the evolution of Gran Turismo from the eyes of the man who made it all possible. It traces Yamauchi’s incredible desire to create a car racing game that will put all others before it to shame. 15 years later, we’re still saying the same thing about Gran Turismo and its incredible advancements in video game technology .

Thanks to the support of Sony, Yamauchi was able to realize his objective and in so doing, the man was able to change the landscape of the gaming and automotive industries now and in the future.

The documentary is almost 90 minutes long so prepare to spend a lot of time to watch it. So prepare the popcorn and find yourself a comfortable couch to sit on. Rest assured, it’s worth every minute if you’re a fan of the Gran Turismo franchise.

It’s true that very few supercars can match the awesomeness of the McLaren P1 , but when it comes to track hooning, there’s more to a car than just brute power and torque. Take the Bugatti Veyron for instance. It comes with more than 1,000 horsepower on tap, which makes it one of the most powerful supercars in production. Is it a proper track car? Not quite. In fact, we don’t see it taking laps very often, which says a lot about its racing capabilities. Race it against the Caterham 620R and you’re bound to lose.

Which brings us to the video below, in which an utterly powerful McLaren P1 is chased by an ultra-light BAC Mono on the Silverstone track. Comparing the P1’s 903 horsepower with the BAC Mono’s 285 ponies, it’s easy to say the latter is no match for the McLaren. However, bring the curb weight into the equation and the 600-horsepower gap reduces dramatically. That’s because the BAC Mono weighs in at only 1,190 pounds, which means 479 horses per tonne. On the other hand, the McLaren tips the scales at 3,280 pounds, resulting into a horsepower per tonne rating of 551 ponies. Not that big of a difference, huh?

This pretty much explains why the BAC Mono in the video above manages to catch up and overtake the McLaren P1 McLaren P1 , although the supercar is obviously faster in a straight line. The lightweight sports car is superior at entering and exiting corners, which proves once again you don’t need nearly 1,000 horsepower to be fast on the track. Hit the play button to watch the action.

Jaguar has launched a new teaser for the XE , ahead of the compact sedan’s official unveiling on September 8th, 2014. Much like the Land Rover Discovery Sport’s interior teaser video , which ties the company’s future with that of the space program, the new XE footage revolves around the Royal Air Force’s Red Arrows aerobatic team. In fact, the XE only makes a brief appearance in the video, being shown as it is transported by helicopter during the final seconds. The vehicle is too far away in the distance, which means we’ll have to settle for the teaser photo Jaguar released earlier in 2014.

As a brief reminder, the XE was developed as a competitor for the BMW 3 Series, but it will also be Britain’s main weapon against the likes of the Mercedes Mercedes -Benz C-Class and the Audi A4. With most of its body structure and chassis made from aluminum, the XE is expected to be lightest sedan in its segment and deliver class-leading fuel economy in its most frugal trim. Power will come from JLR’s new Ingenium engine family and will include both gasoline and diesel powerplants. A high-performance version motivated by the familiar supercharged, 5.0-liter V-8 mill is also in the books.

The first model to be unveiled will be the XE S, with the rest of the lineup to break cover during the Paris Motor Show in October 2014. Stay tuned to TopSpeed for more details on the compact sedan next week.

Volvo’s recently released 2016 XC90 has the industry abuzz about the all-new crossover’s elegant design and futuristic interior. While the ink is still wet on the XC90’s debut headlines, Volvo has dropped an important piece to its latest vehicle’s puzzle. This Volvo-originated testing shows the new crossover getting subjected to the worst kinds of treatment.

The first battery of testing involves the common frontal offset crash at 40 mph. As the vehicle hits the barrier, the crumple zones do their job in defecting the majority of the crash’s energy away from the passenger compartment. It doesn’t even look like the side door was even scratched. Not even the windshield shows signs of damage.

The side impact test comes next, as the XC90 gets slammed with a dummy car at 35 mph. The simulated T-bone crash shows the side doors getting pushed inward, however the dual side-airbag system prevented the test dummy from ever hitting the door panel or window.

Lastly the rollover crash test simulates just that — a dreaded rollover where the vehicle spends time bouncing down the road on its roof. The test shows the side-curtain airbags deploying as the roof structure stays in place. It’s hard to tell for sure, but it seems all the occupants could simply open the doors and walk away from this crash.

While it hasn’t been official tested by the IIHS or NHTSA, it appears the all-new Volvo XC90 will pass with flying colors. It’s amazing how far crashworthiness of vehicles has come since Volvo became the first automaker to include seat belts in all its vehicles back in 1959.

Leave it to Red Bull to pull off a stunt like this. The F1 racing team got the help of FLIR, the leading company in infrared camera systems, to do some high-speed infrared video of its car commencing in gratuitous burnouts.

The video provided by the high-speed FLIR cameras is absolutely stunning, with hot pebbles of rubber and scorching exhaust gases showering front and rear of the racecar . The slow motion effects add all the more drama. The footage was captured at the GAMMA Racing Day 2014 at the famed TT circuit Assen.

FLIR captured these shots with several of its camera systems, including the T650sc, the B660, and the x6580sc for high-speed shots. FLIR is the world’s largest company specializing in infrared cameras has supplies cameras to everyone from the U.S. Military , to BMW for uses in their vehicles, to a consumer-based infrared camera for the iPhone .

One thing is for sure, you’ve never seen doughnuts like this before.

If you thought the GT-R -powered Nissan Juke and its 545 horsepower was a crazy idea, then you’re in for a big surprise. Nismo’s crazy limited-edition crossover is far from being the fastest Juke ever built and it’s quite slow compared to the monster a Russian company managed to create. How’s that possible, you may ask? Well, the folks over at Shpilli Villi Engineering squeezed no less than 800 ponies out of Godzilla’s twin-turbo, 3.8-liter, V-6 engine, while adding a shot of nitrous for an extra 200 horses. That’s right, this Juke has no less than 1,000 horsepower traveling through its drivetrain, albeit only for a few seconds.

So what do you do when you have at least 800 horses to spare besides winning a dozen drag races against the world’s most powerful supercars ? You take it to the Nurburgring track, of course, the place where all production cars go to have their engines and chassis refined. Not that this Juke needs further tweaks or any race-course time given its purpose, but at least the Juke R isn’t one of those massive SUVs BMW and Mercedes-Benz keeps bringing at the ’Ring.

Naturally, the overly powerful crossover isn’t the kind of vehicle you’d expect to set a new Nurburgring record, especially on a wet track, but owner and race car driver Vladimir Ulanov manages to put the Juke R through its paces and clock a few fast laps. Thankfully, the Russians captured it all on tape and you can watch the madness in the video above.

Jay’s latest adventure takes a deep dive into hot-rodding history with this beautiful 1932 Ford Highboy roadster . But don’t pass this off as just another deuce coupe . No, this car is the deuce coupe. Jay has with him Bruce Meyer, the car’s restorer and current owner, who tells of a storied past barely imaginable.

The story began in the late 1940s as U.S. soldiers were returning home from the war. At that time, Bob McGee was a student at the University of Southern California and had customized the 1932 Ford in ways never done before. He had notched the frame in order to lower the car, added a custom three-piece hood, V-notched the spreader bar, removed the fenders, shaved the radiator cap and door handles, reworked the car’s interior, and added a 21-stud, Flathead V-8 from a 1934 Ford.

The car then gains even more notoriety when Bob Petersen, the owner of Hot Rod Magazine and Petersen Publishing, shot a picture of McGee in his deuce coupe cruising along the USC campus for the cover of Hot Rod Magazine. As it turns out, McGee’s roadster was one of the first hot rods to grace the magazine’s cover.

McGee eventually had to sell his beloved roadster and the car underwent many other modifications over the years by the hands of several owners. That’s when Bruce Meyer got a hold of it. He painstakingly restored the car back to its original glory, even employing the direction of McGee in his older age.

Now we get to enjoy this piece of history as Jay and Bruce drive the 1932 Ford down its native streets of Southern California. This, my friends, is the definition of hot-rodding.

Good morning, TopSpeeders; we’re serving up a hot helping of vulcanized donuts for your visual consumption. Today’s chef is Brian Scotto and his 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo do the cooking. This isn’t just a regular 911 Turbo, this Porsche has been worked over by the Japanese company Rauh-Welt Begriff. Scotto and RWB have done some serious modifications to the Porsche , not exclusive to that outlandish body kit. The car’s suspension sits an inch and a half lower, and it rides on 265/40 series tires up front and crazy-big 315/30 series tires out back. The rubber wraps wheels from Fifteen52 sized in 18-by-11 inches and 18-by-12 inches respectively.

Since the car was built just days before the 2011 SEMA show, Scotto and RWB initially left the engine and drivetrain alone. That meant the turbocharged, 3.3-liter, flat-six engine originally cranked out 315 horsepower at 5,750 rpm and 332 pound-feet of torque at 4,500 rpm. Those were pretty healthy stats for a car built over 20 years ago. However in recent times, the guys at BBI Autosport slapped on a new exhaust and engine management tuning to squeeze an estimated 440 horses from the rear-mounted engine.

The story behind this Porsche’s trip to SEMA circles around Scotto’s and co-operator and WRC driver Ken Block’s launching of the Hoonigan brand. The Porsche served as the point car and help differentiate Block as an independent driver not attached to Ford.

All that’s well and good, but donuts are more fun. So enjoy this heaping helping of tire-burning, smoke-billowing, hooning fun. And make sure not to miss the vintage Mr. Donuts reference in the video.


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