world record

world record

  Cars that amke it all the way to the world record book

A 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO has become the most expensive car sold at auction after changing owners for a whopping $38,115,000 at Bonhams’ Quail Lodge Auction in Carmel, California. The classic Prancing Horse surpassed the auction record set by a 1954 Mercedes-Benz W196R Formula One race car that sold for $30 million at the 2013 Goodwood Festival of Speed Auction.

Only 39 of these Ferraris were built in the 1960s, with many of them fetching millions of dollars during either public auctions or private sales. One example that was owned by Stirling Moss changed hands for $35 million in 2012, while another 250 GTO sold for $52 million in 2013. Both were sold privately.

Powered by a 3.0-liter, V-12 engine, the 250 GTO shown above — chassis and engine number 3851GT — was driven to a second-place overall finish in the 1962 Tour de France by Jo Schlesser and Henry Oreiller. More a maintained car than a restored one, the 3851GT has been active all its 54-year-long life, being raced in many classic motorsport events. It’s one of the most often raced 250 GTOs and it has been in a single family ownership for the past 49 years. This pretty much explains the huge price tag, doesn’t it?

The $38-million 250 GTO wasn’t the only Ferrari to fetch big bucks at Bonhams’ sale in California. Ten other Italian sports and race cars crossed the block for a combined total of $65.9 million. The bundle included a 1962 250 GT SWB Speciale that sold for $6.8 million, a 1953 250 Mille Miglia Berlinetta driven by Phil Hill for $7.2 million, and a 1978 312 T3 Formula One car for $2.3 million.

Click past the jump to read about the Ferrari 250 GTO

You know that saying "when you’re at the top, there’s no other place to go but down?" Yeah, try telling that to Hennessey . The company that already has the fastest production car in the world (Guinness fails to certify it due to its crafty rules) in its stable is shooting for the stars with plans to develop evil in a vehicular form. The Texas-based company calls this evil on wheels the Venom F5.

Hennessey boss John Hennessey broke the news to Top Gear, gushing about the possibility of the Venom F5 hitting a top speed no other production car in the world has been able to attain. "I think something in the 290-mph range will be possible," Hennessey said.

The man apparently didn’t misspeak when he said "290 mph," which is all the indication you need to know that Mr. Hennessey Hennessey has either lost his mind or he is determined to drive Bugatti insane with constant pressure from Texas. The Venom F5 name pretty much says it all. That "F5" nomenclature is a reference to the most powerful classification given to tornadoes, or in the case of the Venom, a destructive output of around 1,400 horsepower.

All these horses are reigned in by a single-clutch, paddle-shift transmission, not the Ricardo, six-speed manual found in the Venom GT. You can, however, opt for the manual, if you like.

Start quivering in your boots, Bugatti . It’s better to embrace the inevitable than continue fighting for your cause.

Updated 08/05/2014: Hennessey unveiled a handful of official details on the Venom F5. Check them out after the jump.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Hennessey Venom F5.

Traveling at high speeds involves some pretty scary physics. That’s why the Bloodhound SSC project has been in the works for nearly five years and involves some of the brightest engineers from around the globe. The latest video to come from the British project shows the level of testing undergone for a single part, in this case, the wheel.

See, the Bloodhound SSC is a supersonic car designed for solely for breaking the 1,000-mph speed barrier. The ‘car’ is powered by a jet engine and rockets to achieve such a fast velocity. At 1,100 mph, the Bloodhound’s 35.5-inch (902.6-mm) aluminum wheels spin at a whopping 10,429 rpm. That’s 174 rotations per second!

At that speed, the wheel’s diameter expands by 1.6 mm (0.62 inches) and its temperature starts to rise. In fact, during testing the wheel started to heat up at the rate of two degrees Fahrenheit per second due to aerodynamic friction. At its max, the wheel peaked at 204 degrees Fahrenheit, only 100 degrees shy of aluminum becoming soft.

The Bloodhound SSC team is continuing to work throughout the year with hopes of breaking the 1,100-mph land-speed at a location in South Africa.

The Toyota GT 86 may have lost some of its appeal since arriving in 2012, but it’s still capable of making the right kind of headlines. One of those times arrived when German driver Harald Muller set a world record for the longest drift. His car of choice? A specially prepared Toyota GT 86.

The record-breaking attempt happened in Samsun, Turkey on July 15th. During the event, Muller was able to drift the GT 86 a grand total of 89.55 miles, shattering the previous record of 51.278 miles set last year by BMW Performance Center instructor Jeff Schwartz. Muller’s performance is pretty incredible, one that was made even more impressive when you consider that he completed 612 laps in a somewhat continuous drift. The feat also took 2 hours, 25 minutes and 18 seconds, which is a pretty long time to go around in circles without even taking so much as a water break in between.

It’s a pretty cool feat even though it seemed like the GT 86 appeared to lose momentum on a couple of occasions. But hey, a record’s a record and Muller’s performance was good enough to receive the Guinness Book of World Record’s stamp of approval. Harald Muller now holds the record for longest drift, setting a new benchmark that a lot of drifters will probably try to break in the near future.

The Nurburgring has seen another record fall on its hallowed grounds, only this time the record-setter is the Range Rover Sport SVR . Yes, Range Rovers are SUVs, although you probably knew that by now. But the Range Rover Sport SVR is still something else and it proved as much when it lapped the legendary race track in 8 minutes and 14 seconds.

That isn’t just a fast lap time; it’s record-breaking lap time that has earned the Range Rover Sport SVR the distinction of being the fastest production SUV to lap the Nurburgring.

Don’t sleep on the Range Rover Sport SVR’s accomplishment because it’s an incredibly impressive lap time for an SUV that just made its debut at the 2014 Goodwood Festival of Speed in June. It didn’t take long for it to make quite an impression, right? Of course, what else would you expect from an SUV that features a 5.0-liter, supercharged, V-8 engine that pumps out 542 horsepower?

The Range Rover Sport SVR isn’t expected to hit dealerships until next year. But as early as July 2014, the SUV has already established itself as one of the fastest and most powerful SUVs in recent years.

Don’t be surprised if the Range Rover Sport SVR turns into a sales hit when it becomes available next year. With a record-setting lap time on its mantle, there’s no reason to believe otherwise.

Click past the jump for more details on Range Rover Sport SVR’s record at Nurburgring.

We’ve told you about the Mitsubishi MiEV Evolution III the automaker took to the Pikes Peak hill climb in June 2014, but now we bring you this rather thrilling video. Strapped to driver Greg Tracy’s roll cage, the camera records his record-breaking hill climb time of just 9:08.188. That’s the fasted time ever recorded for an all-electric car and the second fastest time of the entire event.

It’s amazing to watch just how quickly the MiEV Evolution III accelerates and handles around those corners. Then again, it’s not surprising considering the vehicle’s four electric motors kick out 611 horsepower. Each of those four motors are mounted at each wheel and help power the car through corners without any wheel spin. It’s part of the Mitsubishi ’s Super All-Wheel Control all-wheel-drive system.

What’s more, the MiEV Evolution III had the advantage of not losing power as it climbed over 5,000 feet during its nine-minute run, unlike gasoline-powered vehicles. Also helping its case is a lightweight tube chassis and a wind tunnel-optimized body that helps cut through the air and provide substantial downforce at higher speeds.

Keep an eye on the speedometer as Tracy accelerates out of the hairpin corners. It’s amazing to watch the digits skip by, nearly counting by 10 as the scenery blurs by.

17 years ago, a team of British enthusiasts came to the Black Rock Desert in Nevada to set a new land speed record. The group was led by famed Scottish entrepreneur Richard Noble and had the jet-propelled, Thrust SSC car at its disposal. The attempt was not only successful, but it also became the first to officially break the sound barrier at 763.035 mph.

The benchmark remained untouchable to this day, but that could change in 2016, when Noble’s team will try to take the supersonic record into 1,000-mph territory with a brand-new vehicle. That car goes by the name of Bloodhound SSC and comes to prove that jet power, rocket power and a more conventional V-8 engine can work together under the same roof.

Much like the Thrust SSC, the Bloodhound SSC is being built using advanced, aerospace construction techniques, acres of carbon fiber and titanium, and a bevy of state-of-the-art technology.

Why are we reviewing a supersonic car you may ask? Well, the Bloodhound SSC might very well preview some of the technologies we will find in the road-going vehicles of the future. But most importantly, this land rocket is tuned to reach mind-boggling speeds by means of 130,000 horsepower!

Click past the jump to read more about the 2014 Bloodhound SSC.

Records are always meant to be broken. It’s just that some take longer than others. That’s a nice tenet to hold on to when talking about a recent record-breaking lap time at the Goodwood Festival of Speed involving the Nissan GT-R Nismo Time Attack. The Japanese supercar not only made an incredible impression at Goodwood, but it also stamped its authority on the event’s existing supercar record lap time by completely obliterating it.

The record-setting lap time was set at the event’s Michelin Supercar run. 2011 GT Academy winner, Jann Mardenborough, was behind the wheel of the GT-R Time Attack when it set the blistering lap time of 49.27 seconds, beating out the Noble M600 for the record lap.That’s an incredible achievement for a young man whose only racing experience came in the form of video games.

Making Mardenborough’s lap time all the more impressive was how he was able to navigate the GT-R Time Attack to a faster lap time than some pretty incredible supercars driven by the likes of former F1 drivers Bruno Senna and Rupert Keegan.

Think the Ferrari LaFerrari , the Pagani Huayra , and the McLaren P1 posted faster lap times than the GT-R ’Time Attack’?

None of them did.

Click past the jump to read more about the Nissan GT-R Nismo ‘Time Attack’.

Source: TopCar

Renault has just regained its Nurburgring record as the fastest production car with front-wheel-drive. As promised earlier this year , the French automaker stormed the German track and lapped the Nordschleife in less than eight minutes with a brand-new iteration of the Renault Megane RS .

The new benchmark was established only a couple of months after Spanish manufacturer Seat put the Leon Cupra atop the front-wheel-drive record list. The hatchback lapped the German course in 7:58.4, stealing a record that has been with Renault for about three years. Renault’s previous accomplishment was achieved with the Megane RS 265 Trophy, a sportier, 265-horsepower version of its Euro-spec C-segment vehicle.

Now, the French reclaimed their Nurburgring crown by using an updated version of the Megane: the RS 275 Trophy-R. Make no mistake though, it’s not the same hot hatch we met last month. The vehicles might be similar in appearance and sport the same engine under the hood, but that extra "R" added to the moniker means the record car is even lighter than the exclusive, limited-run hatch.

What sets the two apart, you may ask? Stick around and you’ll find out.

Click past the jump to read more about Renault’s record at Nurburgring.

Le Mans has a long history of record making and breaking. Since the 24 hour race first began in 1923, it has been a true mecca of speed and innovation. Now Nissan has attacked this legendary course and set a new Le Mans record speed for electric-powered vehicles by achieving a velocity of 300 kph (186 mph) during qualifying with its ZEOD RC . The record was reached in the first run of the second night’s qualifying by driver Satoshi Motoyama as he blasted down the Mulsanne Straight.

The ZEOD RC uses a unique dual-powertrain configuration with both an electric motor and an internal-combustion engine. Nissan has big plans for this new machine and is looking to break many more records over the course of the weekend’s race.

Nissan wasn’t the only company looking to make waves at Le Mans this year either. Toyota challenged the Audi team that dominated for the last several years, and Porsche has returned to challenge for an overall title as well with F1 ace Mark Webber at the wheel. This year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans was quite an exciting time for motorsports.

Click past the jump to read more about the Nissan ZEOD RC.


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