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For as long as Ducati has been around, there are only a handful of its bikes that can stake claim to being as beautiful as the 1963 98 T. First introduced at the 1952 Milan show as the 98 model, the 98 T became the epitome of Ducati’s excellence in that era.

The bike came with a pressed spine frame, 17" wheels, and a 98 CC OHV single engine that produced 5.5 horsepower at 6,800 rpm. It had a top speed of 46.5 mph and was mated to a four-speed transmission.

Through a number of updates and modifications, the 98 evolved into the 98 T in 1957 where it lasted for six years until 1963, at which time a full evolution of the bike was done. This particular 98 T model - CN: DM 3614 - came as a restored model with excellent paint and chrome finishes, making for an interesting collection piece for any avid Ducati collector.

Expected bid price at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco ranged from €3,000 - €4,000, which is about $3,800 - $5,200 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $758.

When talking about Ducati bikes with some serious racing pedigree in the 60’s, the Ducati 250 Diana has to be mentioned because it was the very first sporting 250 model that every young man had his eyes set on.

Aesthetically, the racing heritage was pretty evident, specifically the addition of racy clip-on handlebars, handsome new styling, and crackling exhaust note. It also weighed just 265 pounds, making its 249 cc SHC single engine more than capable of being a barn burner.

The horsepower output from the 250 Diana reaches 24 ponies and was capable of blasting off at a top speed of 85 mph. Eventually, the 250 Diana’s success spawned itself into a new model - the Mark 3 Super Sport - one that was more than adept at producing a stout 30 horsepower and mated to a five-speed transmission.

The early example that was on offer was believed to be a Diana, but is of an atypical configuration, akin to the sister model Monza, with high bars and a single seat. It has been finished in a black and gray, two-tone set up with sharp chrome details and was the subject of a thorough restoration.

It was at the RM Auctions in Monaco came with an expected auction price of €4,000 - €6,000, which is around $6,200 - $9,400 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $1,515.

As one of the earliest motorcycles Ducati has ever produced, there’s no shortage of history when it comes to the Cucciolo 65T. Designed by no less than Giovanni Fiorio, the 60 of 1949 became the first real motorcycle in Ducati’s history.

This was then followed by the 60 Sport in 1950, which came with a basic pushrod design and a 65 cc OHV single cylinder engine mated to a three-speed transmission. The model lasted in production until 1967 in the form of the 125 cc Cadet.

Back then, the Cucciolo 65T wasn’t so much into performance, as evidenced by the 2.25 horsepower output it generated. But for a bike of its time, and the technology that was available then, the Cucciolo 65T was as eye-catching then as it is today as a nice old restoration.

The Ducati Cucciolo 65T was put up for auction at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco with an estimated price of €3,000 - €4,000, which is around $3,800 - $5,200 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $3,030.

The Ducati 125 TS has lasted the test of time. Not only has it become one of the finest Ducati bikes ever built, but it also became the base model for which lightweight motorcycles are being designed today.

The 1964 125 TS is powered by a 124 cc SOHC single engine that’s mated to a four-speed transmission. That powertrain is capable of hitting a top speed of 70 mph with peak revs reaching 8,500 rpm.

Despite its less than imposing stature, the 125 TS has become one of the most popular classic Ducatis around. It’s a consistent presence in a number of vintage shows and competitive events, including the prestigious Motogiro d’Italia.

The model that was auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco was in sound original condition, and came with the bike’s original Rosso Rubino paint, adding history and character to an all-time classic. Expected bid price for the 125 TS was about €3,000 - €4,000, which is around $3,800 - $5,200 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $3,409.

America has always liked its bikes to carry more power. That wasn’t any more evident than with the Ducati 160 Monza, a product of the 125 cc SOHC engine that was increased to 160 cc to cater to the power-hungry US market.

In addition to the 160 cc SOHC single engine that produced a top speed of 63 mph and was mated to a four-speed transmission, the Ducati 160 Monza also came with a bevy of features that further elucidated its Americanized credentials. Among these features include a square tank towards the end of its production run, as well as a side panel and engine number that pretty much let everyone know that the bike came with a 160-cc engine.

The Ducati 160 Monza that made its way to the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco remains in sound, unrestored condition and is also one of only a few models left in the last production run of the 160 Monza line.

The auction price for the Ducati 160 Monza was around €2,000 - €3,000, which is about $2,500 - $3,800 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $1,515.

When Ducati introduced a non-Desmo version of the 350 Super Sport, it paved the way for a new line of bikes that have come to be known as the 350 GTV. Built from 1977 to 1981, the 350 GTV model weren’t the most powerful or most reliable Ducatis in history.

That’s why through a strange twist of fate, finding one in good working condition these days is a Herculean task. Never mind the fact that the 350 GTV comes with a 350 cc SOHC twin engine that’s mated to a five-speed transmission, this particular example sets itself apart because of its model name.

This particular 350 GTV is in sound original form and comes with a two-tone bright green paint and good chrome. If anyone wants to have an ideal Ducati in their collection, the 350 GTV is definitely one of options.

The bike was at the RM Auctions in Monaco and came with an estimated bid price of €3,000 - €4,000, which is about $3,769 - $5,026 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $1,515.

The Ducati 125 Scrambler was one of those period bikes from the Italian automaker that truly gained a sizable following. First born with a 125 cc SOHC narrow case engine, the model evolved into a 160 cc before topping out at 250 cc, which, incidentally, also came with Marzochi forks.

The 1970 125 Scrambler pictured here is particularly important because it is one of the models that came with a 160 cc SOHC single engine and mated to a four-speed transmission - all while continuing to use the "125" name. As a small and relatively lightweight machine, the 125 Scrambler’s appeal is that it’s one bike that you wouldn’t mind getting down and dirty with.

The particular 1970 Ducati 125 Scrambler that was auctioned at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco was an unrestored model that came with its original orange and black paint scheme. The estimated bid price for the bike was around €3,000 - €4,000, which is around $3,800 - $5,200 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $6,061.

The Ducati 1000 SS Corsa is an evolution from the Italian bike maker’s 900 SS, resulting in a bike that came powered with a 992 cc fuel-injected two-valve engine. This bike was capable of producing 84 horsepower with a top speed of 134 mph. Quite a quick runner, isn’t it?

The bike that was on bid at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco carried a simpler fairing, one that was based on the Supersport that ran from 1990 to 1997. It may look like a throwback to the 851/888, but the tank and seat are from an earlier SS.

The mileage on the bike is unknown, but this racing motorcycle, prepared by Carlo Saltarelli, was intended for privateers and is presented in good original condition with a Conti exhaust and presentable paintwork.

It would make for an exciting track day racer despite not carrying any racing history. The bid price for the bike was at €5,000 - €7,000, which is around $6,300 to $8,800 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $3,030.

The Ducati 98 Moto Giro ran for a pretty long time in the 50’s and the early part of the 60’s, and was more than just a standard road-going bike. The model that was sitting at the RM Auctions in Monaco, in particular, appeared to have been a period race bike, with some evidence of race-preparation, including a straight-through pipe and a 98 cc OHV single cylinder engine that produced 6.8 horsepower with a top speed of 68 mph. It was mated to a four-speed transmission.

Some quarters even believe that this 98 Moto Giro was a participant at the Motogiro d’Italia, a race that we can safely say is one of the toughest in the sport of bike racing.

With all this history attached to it, it’s no surprise that the bike had an estimated bid price of €8,000 - €12,000, which is around $10,000 - $15,000 based on current exchange rates. What is surprising is that it only sold for $4,545.

The Ducati 125 Cadet/4 was one of the last Ducati bikes to carry the pushrod overhead-valve single cylinder engine. Making it even more attractive as a collector’s piece is that the bike only lasted two years because Berliner, the U.S. distributor of Ducati, decided they were not suitable for the American market.

The 125 Cadet/4 also shared many cycle parts with the two-stroke engine, although the engine was still based on the aforementioned overhead-valve unit. Nonetheless, a number of items on the list were changed, particularly the bore and stroke and the cylinder head design. Likewise, the spark plug was moved to the right, and the two overhead valves were set parallel.

The double cradle tubular steel frame was also similar to another Ducati bike, the 125 Bronco. Finally, the 125 Cadet/4’s 121 cc single-cylinder OHV four-stroke engine was mated to a four-speed transmission. It didn’t have the kind of power that would win races, but it sure did carry enough for a bike made by Ducati.

There aren’t a lot of 125 Cadet/4 bikes on the market today and the bike offered at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco was in unrestored condition. The expected bidding price was €2,000 - €3,000, which is around $2,500 - $3,800 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $758. Ouch!


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