cafe racer

cafe racer

Posted on by Maxx Biker 0

Moto Guzzi’s V7 family now has a new member, which is willing to teach motorcyclists a thing or two about the ways they can enjoy riding the world’s greatest machine with wheels as long as they open their eyes and prick up their ears. Unveiled last week in Milan, the 2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Clubman Racer is reminiscent of 1970s Italian café racers. Then, as now, these were machines that handled beautifully and stopped fast, managing to compete with Japanese bikes with seriously more horsepower available at the rear wheel.

With a 744cc V-twin developing only 48.8 hp and 58.2 Nm, but featuring a beautifully crafted frame, upgraded suspension and brakes, the 2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Clubman Racer remains faithful to the original recipe and addresses to nostalgics of the period. Also featuring wrapped headers and upswept Arrow exhuasts, polished aluminum tank, rearsets and clip-ons as well as Pirelli Demon Sport tires, I guess you can look at it as to a V7 Classic with a soft spot for races. Hit the jump to read the press release.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

BMW has used their experience from building straight six engines for cars into creating a modern café racer concept powered by a six-cylinder engine displacing 1600cc. This means 266cc for each cylinder of the so-called BMW Motorrad Concept 6, which won’t see the production line pretty soon, but word is out that the German car and motorcycle manufacturer will use this precise engine on their next LT grand touring model.

Surely, this isn’t the first two-wheeler powered by an inline six as Honda had the CBX1000 in 1978, but the impressive part about the modern bike is the fact that it is so narrow for this type of engine rarely used on motorcycles. But when it is used it smoothly delivers impressive amounts of torque, which is why we have great expectations in what regards BMW’s future touring lineup. Hit the jump for the BMW Motorrad Concept 6 press release and picture gallery.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

The ’V12 Andreas’ isn’t just one of those concept motorcycles that won’t ever turn into reality, but a running café racer that originally started life as a Honda CBX, which was a six-cylinder UJM (Universal Japanese Motorcycle). Although what Andreas came up with is anything but universal, his custom Honda CBX V12 Café Racer is actually powered by two such engines, which have been joined together, resulting the impressive V12 mill.

These are simple words to describe the amazing amount of work behind this project as Andreas spent a year working on the chains, tensioners and guides, just so that you get a clue of the dedication needed to achieve such a piece of mechanical jewel, but it takes a look at the old-timer’s face to see it was all worth it.

But the engine isn’t the only feature making sure this thing turns heads. This café racer’s entirely polished bodywork looks very cool, especially if you consider the fact that it was hand built. What a bike! Follow the jump for more pictures and no less than four videos of the V12-powered Honda CBX.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

The Honda CB450 looks pretty cool in stock condition, but riders who won’t satisfy with that can always choose the rather facile transformation into a café racer. This particular example was spotted in South Africa as it attracted quite a crowd with its 1970s rebel bike appearance.

Like most café racers, this Honda CB450 stands out thanks to a unique tank and seat unit, while the frame, swingarm don’t look like having suffered any modification and the wheels are the original ones.

The overall sporty look is completed by the bikini fairing and vented mudguard, but if we take a better look at the back, the underseat exhaust tends to turn it into a veritable racing motorcycle, which is what café racers were originally supposed to be. Also, the red/white color scheme was the adequate choice in our opinion.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

The fact that Hollywood star Brad Pitt is passionate to the bone about motorcycles couldn’t ever make the subject of a news, so much the less on this page, but here we bring to you the latest custom motorcycle that sees its way to Brad’s spacious garage.

Dubbed ‘Flash’, this café racer was designed and built by Californian-based custom motorcycle builder Shinya Kimura, who has taken a 1974 Ducati engine as the starting point for his latest special order.

Following the design meets functionality philosophy, the Japanese craftsman has come up with the unique idea of positioning the oil cooler next to the headlight, giving the bike an asymmetric face and, very likely, managing to be beyond all expectations.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 0

The biggest news about the 2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic is that it comes stateside to try and show American riders how 48bhp and 54lb/ft produced by a 744cc, air-cooled V-twin engine can prove terribly enjoyable when the riding position and handling are just right. And if we take in consideration the clip-ons, upswept exhaust pipes, a bullet seat, revised suspension geometry and 40mm Marzocchi forks, which distinguish the Cafe Classic from the regular V7 model, the chances for that to happen are very real. Expect Moto Guzzi to price this at around $9,000. We’ve attached the press information after the break.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 2

Copenhagen-based custom motorcycle builder WrenchMonkees brings Japanese power to the world of café racers with their Monkee number 2. Although it started life as a Kawasaki Z1000 A, there’s little left of the original bike, not even the engine. This was replaced with that of a Z1000 J model, which was upgraded to around 110-115 hp by fitting a 1075cc Wiseco piston kit.

The café racer image was achieved with the use of a Norton fuel tank and a Ducati Monster headlight while the rest of the body parts, but also the mufflers, LED rear light and even the custom paint wear the WM fingerprint.

We can’t help but think about the uncomfortable riding position, read the specs again and appreciate the fact that it has a big engine as well as a retro look until finally reaching to the conclusion that this may very well be something that our favorite Hollywood star would ride to the studios everyday.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

Turning a 1980s Kawasaki Z 1000 J into a café racer doesn’t sound like the easiest task for custom bike builders and while you’ll normally get only visual changes, in this case we’re talking about a whole different bike. Forget about the classic roadster look of the Kawi Z 1000 J, which came as a response to Honda’s CB900, and let yourself be introduced to this low, aggressive and most likely pretty uncomfortable ride signed by WrenchMonkees.

First and foremost, the original 998cc air-cooled, four-stroke, transverse four-cylinder, DOHC with two valves per cylinder engine now displaces 1170cc thanks to a Wiseco piston kit, which raises the standard engine’s 102 hp to an impressive 140 hp. So that’s what the aggressive looks and Brembo brakes are there to cope with.

No doubt about it, this is a ride meant to stand out. It rolls on 17-inch Excel wheels, features custom paint and a whole bunch of WM components among which the fairing, aluminum tank, seat and tailunit are the most important. For more details, read the specs after the break.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 0

When the team at WrenchMonkees got their hands on a 1974 Moto Guzzi 850T they immediately started pointing out the bike’s café racer potential and ended up transforming it in their Copenhagen workshop until the overall result was worthy of their standards.

The original 60 horsepower engine and transmission were kept, but the custom motorcycle builder brought in their own rearframe, seat and fender, while the aluminum racing tank was supplied by WBO.

A nice finishing touch is given by the deep green paint and matt black detailing signed by Cay Brøndum and we also must mention that the wiring is entirely hidden from sight, which makes this custom motorcycle both functional and clean looking. Specs after the break.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 2

What you see here is a Honda CB750 Four café racer designed and built by WrenchMonkees, a custom motorcycle company in Copenhagen, Denmark.

The 85 horsepower, inline-four engine was entirely rebuilt, while the wiring, wheels and bearings have been completely replaced. An excellent final touch is given by the custom paint and satin grey finish on the forks, triple clamp and engine covers, while the headlight mesh is a nice thing to have on a bike like this too.

With a listed top speed of 112.5 mph (180 kmph) and a $30,000 (DKR 186.800) price tag, this WrenchMonkees creation shouldn’t stay long on the floors of the Danish Museum of Arts and Crafts and the Rojo Artspace in Barcelona, where it is currently exhibited. Read the specs after the break.


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