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Posted on by Sulthoni

Californian Roland has multiple track records and the 1998 AMA 250GP Championship under his belt. After 32 broken bones he traded in his helmet and leathers for a computer and a welding torch, designing and building award-winning machines that mark him out as a fresh new talent on the custom scene.

Unconventional, outlandish and ‘way-out’, his designs have landed him a Biker Build-Off Rookie of the Year title and 2Wheel Tuner Brappy Award for Best Appearance Enhancement Product for his innovative Contrast Cut finishes.

One of the most dramatic models developed by Sands is the Yamaha V-MAX, a motorcycle that was launched for the first time in 1985 and has rebirth in 2008, becoming a biking icon.

At the heart of the Yamaha V-MAX Hyper Modified by Roland Sands lies a V-type 4-cylinder, liquid-cooled, 4-stroke, DOHC, 4-valves engine with a displacement of 1,679cc. The engine cranks out 200PS @ 9,000 rpm and has a peak torque of 166.8 Nm at 6,500 rpm.

Hit the jump for more information on the Yamaha V-MAX Hyper Modified by Roland Sands.

Posted on by Sulthoni

Marcus bought his first bike, a Yamaha RD350LC, at the age of 18. He knows what makes Yamaha unique. After bowing out of Moto Cross in 1992, following a serious accident, Marcus invested the proceeds from the sale of his machine into a set of tools and a bike-lift. He set up a workshop in a converted barn and established Walz Hardcore Cycles.

The German invented and developed the world-famous Drag Style frame, a new kind of custom bike. Europe’s most successful bike builder, his creations have appeared on 60 magazine covers and in more than 600 magazine articles and Marcus was the 2006 winner of the Discovery Channel’s hit show Bike Build-Off.

One of its latest creations is the hyper modified VMAX model which is and extreme bike “designed for visual stimulation, balancing aggression and aesthetics”

Hit the jump for more information on the Yamaha V-MAX Hyper Modified by Marcus Walz.

Posted on by Sulthoni 1

The Bajaj Avenger 220 is basically the improved version of the old Avenger 180. The new bike features an elegant design, longer handlebars and a large windshield. You also get a pretty big tank which features an ergonomic design and delivers a pretty generous range.

The engine was borrowed from the Pulsar 220 and Street Fighter 220. It develops a maximum power of 19.03 @ 8400 and 17.5 Nm of torque @ 7000. The engine features digital twin spark ignition for efficient combustion. For increased performances the Avenger 220 is also equipped with the ExhausTEC system which improves engine torque at low revs without compromising anything at mid or high engine revs.

Another interesting feature is the third generation throttle ignition control system. This system allows you to control the ignition by operating the throttle. It also helps in achieving a good balance between driveability and optimum ignition spark advance, resulting in an almost perfect ignition spark advance for every throttle opening and engine rpm.

Hit the jump for more information on the 2012 Bajaj Avenger 220.

Posted on by Sulthoni

Yamaha had the great idea of choosing the best motorcycle builders and ask them to play with their new V Max. One of these famous builders was Frenchman Ludovic, which spent a lot of time and creativity to develop its unique version of the Yamaha V Max.

Frenchman Ludovic has a factory in Annecy-le-Vieux, near the Swiss border, where he turns out two, three and four-wheel creations – including unique car/bike hybrids such as R1-engined bespoke quads and a supercharged 84bhp Yamaha TMax.

Ludovic combines his background as a design graduate and passion for muscle machines. It’s a mix of brain and brawn that results in mad modifications that could come straight out of movie – Mad VMAX. He’s famous for his silhouette style and for his first iconic VMAX customization: taking a wrecked 1991 model, fitting special parts and an LCD screen with a rear-view video link to create a unique hyper-modified VMAX.

Hit the jump for more information on the Yamaha V-MAX Hyper Modified by Ludovic Lazareth.

Ducati’s line of Cucciolo motor bicycles were so successful that by 1950, the Italian bike maker had already sold over 200,000 units of the model. With the demand for the bike hitting fever pitch, Ducati decided to branch out from the Cucciolo and build a model that was developed from it.

Thus, the Ducati 60 Sport was born in March 1950.

Looking the part of those earlier design motorcycles, the 60 Sport was by no means a push-over model. While it was built in the mold of the Cucciolo, the 60 Sport carried its own 65 cc four-stroke OHV engine that was capable of hitting a top speed of 40 mph with a fuel tank capacity of 200 mpg.

The particular 60 Sport model that was auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco is one of the oldest real motorcycles that Ducati has ever built. With a company that has become one of the most famous motorcycle brands in the world, its easy to see how a model that comes with an
older restoration and a pleasing patina will fetch plenty of attention at the auction block.

The Ducati 60 Sport was expected to hit a bid price of around €1,500- €2,500, which is around $1,900 - $3,400 based on current exchange rates. It actually sold for €2,340, about $3,000 at the current exchange rates.

Victory Motorcycles isn’t playing hard-ball with its customers; they just have a bike called Hard-Ball that they pulled the covers off recently in Long Beach, California.

In typical High-Ball fashion, the 2012 Victory Hard-Ball arrived in one no-nonsense color: Matte Black with tasteful red pin striping. For an old-school look, the bike received black spoke wheels - 18" on the front and 16" on the rear - shod with blackwall Dunlop Elite tires. The Hard-Ball’s triple-disc brakes with standard ABS are fully modern binders.

The 1731cc Freedom 106 provides a spirited ride with a wide spread of power on the High-Ball, and despite a little larger fender on the front end, steering is still light enough, even with the absence of a fairing most baggers or tourers sport. The Hard-Ball also features a single-overhead cam with four valves per cylinder and self-adjust cam chains with hydraulic lifters. The 106 Freedom V-Twin also breathes through a modern Electronic Fuel Injection with dual, 45mm throttle bodies, and split dual exhaust with a crossover pipe for enhanced performance. The powertrain is mated to a 6-Speed overdrive transmission with "Neutral Selection Assist and helical-cut gears to ensure every shift is as quiet and smooth as the one before."

As for handling, the chassis design of the bike comes with a longer wheelbase (65.7" worth), a higher seat (26.25"), and more ground clearance (5.8"). The Hard-Ball also adds some touring amenities, safety and comfort, including a larger air-deflecting battery cover, split dual exhaust, and a longer rear fender.

Find out more about the Victory Hard-Ball after the jump.

You can pretty much put the nail in the proverbial coffin because Victory’s new Hammer 8-Ball cruiser is poised to take the next step in becoming one of the premier cruiser motorcycles in the world.

For the 2012 model, the Hammer 8-Ball returns with the ideal platform for the motorcyclist who wants a bike that he can customize to his heart’s content. As always, Victory offers many custom accessories to personalize the Hammer 8-Ball. As far as aesthetics go, the Hammer 8-ball comes dressed with a sporty bodywork, highlighted by a short front fender and a high-cut rear fender that shows off the 250mm rear tire. This bike also has inverted forks and a removable black cowl that covers the passenger seat during solo riding.

The Hammer 8-Ball’s powertrain system also allows you to travel far distances, thanks to the Freedom V-Twin power plant that delivers 97 horsepower and 113 ft lbs of green-light torque with ultimate authority. The dark heart of the Hammer 8-Ball lies in this system, informing the world of your arrival with every crack of the throttle. Mated to this engine is a 6-speed transmission that comes with true overdrive and neutral assist, making it easy to find neutral when stopped.

Victory is also offering a host of accessories for the Hammer 8-Ball, including windshields, backrests, saddlebags, Vegas passenger seat, grips, performance exhausts, and more.

Find out more about the Victory Hammer 8-Ball after the jump.

We all love limited edition pieces of anything, and in the case of a Victory motorcycle, we’d sign up for the Crossroads Classic Limited Edition. The 2012 Cross Roads LE is a numbered model which includes exclusive paint, graphics, pinstriping, a classic leather seat and saddlebags with custom stitching, wire wheels, a different windshield, cool chrome light bar, fender bumpers, and saddlebag rails with tip-over protection.

Plenty of new digs, right? Wait, it gets even better.

With the Crossroads Classic LE, you also get to pick your color, saddlebag style, windshield style, and over 48 different customization combinations for the touring motorcycles. A list of Pure Victory accessories can also be added to the program, taking it to another level of custom and added levels of protection and comfort. Windshields, touring seats, backrests, heated handgrips, and cruise control are but a few of the aftermarket upgrades already available for the 2012 Cross Roads LE.

More than just styling, the Crossroads Classic LE also comes with an air-adjust rear suspension makes it easy to optimize the bike for solo or two-up riding. ABS, cruise control, dual-disc front brakes, inverted forks, and a 5.8-gallon tank round out the package. The aforementioned engine type used in the Victory is a Freedom SOHC V-Twin engine that delivers an impressive 109 lb/ft of torque, making the bike a distinct cruiser that not only packs quite a punch, but can also be customized to your liking.

Find out more about the Victory Crossroads Classic LE after the jump.

As far as luxury cruisers are concerned, there are plenty of options to choose from in its segment. But if you’re looking for a bike that has a Victory badge on it, the Vision Tour will answer your call. Returning in full-luxury format and providing riders with comfort, protection, convenience, and much cargo space, the Vision Tour makes no bones about all the benefits that come with it as a luxury cruiser.

The distinctive body style of the Vision Tour incorporates a full fixed fairing with the set-up of the bike fixed for touring, thanks to the side-storage compartments, and a lockable trunk with 29 gallons serving as extra cargo space. At the trunk of the Vision Tour is a passenger backrest with additional audio speakers incorporated to pair with the ones integrated in the fairing. The bike also features a comfortable 2-up seating, a low driver seat height of just 26.5", an electric windshield height control, heated seats, and heated handlebar grips.

Handling is also a premium quality of the Vision Tour with the linked abs providing Victory Vision riders with confidence-inspiring braking. High resolution sensors on each wheel monitor the wheel’s speed, and should they sense anything out of the ordinary, the abs system provides instant, effective braking, slowing down the bike and allowing the rider to maintain control the whole way.

Find out more about the Vision Victory Tour after the jump.

When Victory introduced the Cross Country in late 2009, it didn’t take long for the bagger to become a market favorite. This bike provided a fresh face in the factory bagger segment with the edgy lines of its fork-mounted fairing, a beautifully crafted tank with a raised spine, sharp lines and strategic recesses, and handling that its competitors wished they could match.

Now that the Cross Country has its legs under it in the segment, 2012 offered the perfect opportunity to release its full touring credentials in the Cross Country Tour.

As a take on the Cross Country, the Cross Country Tour comes with plenty of new features, including a taller windshield, the addition of a big top-case that doubles as a passenger backrest, extra speakers for the stereo system, new lower fairings, and a slick new system of vents and deflectors which allow riders to channel air flow to their liking. The Tour’s tall, wide windshield helps pocket the rider in a cocoon in mostly still air while the new topcase provides a contoured, padded backrest. When passengers are kicking back in the improved accommodations of the bike, the extra speakers integrated into the top-case makes for a great listening experience as their hair is being blasted off by the wind.

The large fork-mounted fairing of the Cross Country Tour now wears new, clear wind deflectors located on the fairing’s lower edge. The deflectors, along with the airflow controls in the lowers, are what Victory calls the Comfort Control System.

Find out more about the Victory Cross Country Tour after the jump.


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