Ducati 125

Ducati 125

The Ducati 125 TS has lasted the test of time. Not only has it become one of the finest Ducati bikes ever built, but it also became the base model for which lightweight motorcycles are being designed today.

The 1964 125 TS is powered by a 124 cc SOHC single engine that’s mated to a four-speed transmission. That powertrain is capable of hitting a top speed of 70 mph with peak revs reaching 8,500 rpm.

Despite its less than imposing stature, the 125 TS has become one of the most popular classic Ducatis around. It’s a consistent presence in a number of vintage shows and competitive events, including the prestigious Motogiro d’Italia.

The model that was auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco was in sound original condition, and came with the bike’s original Rosso Rubino paint, adding history and character to an all-time classic. Expected bid price for the 125 TS was about €3,000 - €4,000, which is around $3,800 - $5,200 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $3,409.

The Ducati 125 Scrambler was one of those period bikes from the Italian automaker that truly gained a sizable following. First born with a 125 cc SOHC narrow case engine, the model evolved into a 160 cc before topping out at 250 cc, which, incidentally, also came with Marzochi forks.

The 1970 125 Scrambler pictured here is particularly important because it is one of the models that came with a 160 cc SOHC single engine and mated to a four-speed transmission - all while continuing to use the "125" name. As a small and relatively lightweight machine, the 125 Scrambler’s appeal is that it’s one bike that you wouldn’t mind getting down and dirty with.

The particular 1970 Ducati 125 Scrambler that was auctioned at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco was an unrestored model that came with its original orange and black paint scheme. The estimated bid price for the bike was around €3,000 - €4,000, which is around $3,800 - $5,200 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $6,061.

The Ducati 125 Cadet/4 was one of the last Ducati bikes to carry the pushrod overhead-valve single cylinder engine. Making it even more attractive as a collector’s piece is that the bike only lasted two years because Berliner, the U.S. distributor of Ducati, decided they were not suitable for the American market.

The 125 Cadet/4 also shared many cycle parts with the two-stroke engine, although the engine was still based on the aforementioned overhead-valve unit. Nonetheless, a number of items on the list were changed, particularly the bore and stroke and the cylinder head design. Likewise, the spark plug was moved to the right, and the two overhead valves were set parallel.

The double cradle tubular steel frame was also similar to another Ducati bike, the 125 Bronco. Finally, the 125 Cadet/4’s 121 cc single-cylinder OHV four-stroke engine was mated to a four-speed transmission. It didn’t have the kind of power that would win races, but it sure did carry enough for a bike made by Ducati.

There aren’t a lot of 125 Cadet/4 bikes on the market today and the bike offered at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco was in unrestored condition. The expected bidding price was €2,000 - €3,000, which is around $2,500 - $3,800 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $758. Ouch!

Back in the late 50’s and the early 60’s, Ducati had the 125 Aurea, considered one of the best push-rod models in the Italian bike maker’s line-up. Carrying a 125 cc OHV single-cylinder engine that produced 6.5 horsepower and mated to a four-speed transmission, the 125 Aurea was capable of hitting a top speed of 53.3 mph.

Back in those days, 53.3 mph wasn’t something you could just scoff at.

As for this 1958 Ducati 125 Aurea, the final series model was being offered at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco. An original example with CN: DM125A/87831, this particular 125 Aurea is finished in a two-tone blue and gold paint finish and could be a candidate for a nice restoration program. It’s the kind of bike that’s going to look completely sick once the restoration job is done.

Interested bidders for this 1958 Ducati 125 Aurea were expected to keep around €2,500 - €3,500 handy, which is around $3,200 - $4,500 based on current exchange rates. Turns out, they didn’t need that much as it was auctioned off for $1,136.

There was a point in Ducati’s history when everything wasn’t so hunky-dory for the Italian automaker. Back in the 70’s, Ducati was in the middle of one of the worst stretches in its history, having failed to catch on to the 250-, 350-, and 450-cc markets.

Nevertheless, Ducati soldiered on, and from 1975-1977, they were able to build a bike - the 125 Regolarita Six Days - that ended up being one of the rarest Ducati models in history.

The scarcity of this bike doesn’t have anything to do with the modest power train - a 124 cc two-stroke single engine that’s mated to a six-speed transmission - nor does it have anything to do with the relatively heavy frame either (it weighs 238 lbs!).

People are going crazy for this model today because the bike was cancelled relatively early in its production cycle, making it one of the most difficult bikes to get a hold of.

The bike had an expected auction price of €3,500 - €4,500, which is around $4,500 - $5,800 based on current exchange rates, when it went up for auction at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco. Actual selling price was $8,333.

The wide range of Ducati bikes that were auctioned off on May 11, 2012 present a list of some of the most historically significant machines the Italian bike maker has produced.

One in particular is the Ducati 125 TV ’Testone,’ a bike that first broke into the motorcycle scene back in 1961 as part of Ducati’s line of 125 cc bikes. Despite introducing a more powerful range of 175 cc SOHC bikes four years earlier in 1957, the 1961 TV ’Testone’ still carried the 125cc powertrain until 1968.

As classic bikes go, the 1961 125 TV ’Testone’ is the very definition of the word. In addition to its impressive powertrain, which produced an output of 6.5 horsepower, the bike also carried some significant styling cues other Ducati bikes, particularly those that carried Taglioni’s revolutionary sporting designs.

The model that was auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco carries the chassis number DM 1931 and has been dressed in Ducati’s iconic and traditional Rosso Corsa colors. Despite being half a century old, the bike still remains in great condition and was expected to be sold for a bid price of anywhere between €2,500 - €3,500, which is around $3,200 - $4,500 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $2,652.

This particular Ducati 125 Sport is not like most of its kin. It’s actually the very first bike to be owned by Carlo Saltarelli and is one of the final 125 Sports ever produced.

No wonder it’s got ’collectible’ written all over it.

The bike is powered by a 124 cc SOHC single and is mated to a four-speed transmission. It’s capable of hitting over 70 mph and can rev up to 8,500 rpm. Aesthetically, this 125 Sport has been finished with the bike’s signature metallic blue with gold accents and fitted with alloy rims.

This Ducati 125 Sport was held at the 2012 RM auctions in Monaco and was up for auction with an estimated price of €3,500 - €4,500, which is around $4,400 - $5,600 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $4,545.

As one of the rarest and most historically significant models of the 125 Sport, this unit is truly meant to be owned by a Ducati collector.

Before the Ducati 175 broke into the scene, the Ducati 125 Sport was the quintessential early Ducati single. Fast forward to today’s time, and the now classic bike has become the perfect machine for vintage events anywhere, including the Motogiro d’Italia.

But back then, the Ducati 125 Sport was in a league of its own, weighing only 221 pounds and featuring a 124 cc SOHC single engine that produces 10 horsepower and mated to a four-speed transmission. The 125 Sport was capable of hitting a top speed in excess of 70 mph, and when combined with a design that’s as streamlined as any Ducati bike ever built, it was the perfect on-the-road companion for all those merry joy rides.

This particular 1955 Ducati 125 Sport - CN: DM125S/7564 - comes with a two-tone red and white paint finish complete with a distinctive scalloped fuel tank, signature clip-on handlebars, and fully restored chrome finishes.

Expected auction price at the RM Auction sin Monaco was around €3,500 - €4,500, which is around $4,500 - $5,800 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $4,545.


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