Ducati Desmosedici

Ducati Desmosedici

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The Ducati 916 was launched at the Milan Show in October 1993 and made even more of a splash than the Supermono did the year before. While the engine wasn’t significantly different from the 851, it was designed to be easier to service—which was a huge advance—and observers commented on the beautifully detailed workmanship. The engine developed 104.3 horsepower at 9,000 rpm, according to Cycle World, but improved aerodynamics made the 916 significantly faster, clocking 10.72 seconds for the quarter-mile at 130.62 mph and a top speed of 159 mph. The 916 won every magazine’s Bike of the Year award for 1994. The example on offer is a totally original and well-maintained example, in the less common and more attractive bright yellow colour, with gold wheels.

It is powered by a 916 cc liquid cooled DOHC Desmo V-twin engine which is paired with a six speed transmission and has an estimated price of 3.500-€5.000.

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With the bevel drive 900NCR losing its competitive edge, in 1980 Franco Farne developed two of the new belt-driven Pantahs for the Italian national junior championship. They were based on the standard SL frame but with Marzocchi suspension and red and yellow bodywork that looked like the 900NCR. The 583-cc Desmo twin developed 70 horsepower at 9,000 rpm, and the bike on offer here is one of those bikes, presented without its full race fairing.

Presented in good order, this particular bike has Marzocchi forks and shocks, adjustable rear shock absorber, Brembo brakes, racing exhaust and Campagnolo wheels. This bike came from Reparto Corse of Ducati and was purchased by Team Saltarelli and refitted for the 1981 race season, winning the Italian TT junior championship ridden by Amerigo Saltarelli, Carlo’s brother.

The model on offer has an estimated price of €18.000-€20.000 and is powered by a 597 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine paired with a five speeds transmission.

Hit the jump for more information on the Ducati 600 TT Pantah.

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Ducati auctioned the famous Desmosedici GO10 CS1 which is Stoner’s Phillip Island-winning model. The motorcycle comes without the small fairing winglets as they were removed to reduce lift. The Ducati Desmosedici GP10 CS1 has won the race with an average speed of 175.100 kmph. It will be supplied with a certificate of authenticity from Ducati Corse (racing department), and the new owner will be given a VIP tour of the Ducati factory in Bologna.

At the heart of the bike lies a 200+ hp liquid-cooled, 90-degree 799 cc V-4 four-stroke, desmodromic DOHC engine with four valves per cylinder. The engine is mated on a six-speed cassette-type gearbox with alternative gear ratios available and a dry multi-plate slipper clutch.

In terms of suspension, the Ducati Desmosedici is packed with a front Öhlins upside-down 48 mm front forks and a Öhlins rear shock absorber, adjustable for preload, compression and rebound damping.

Hit the jump for more information on the Ducati Desmosedici GP10 CS1.

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The Ducati Desmosedici GP11 VR2 was auctioned by Ducati with an estimated price of €300.000-€350.000. The motorcycle was the second of four variations Rossi raced during the 2011 season but is ostensibly the same as the GP10 of the previous season.

The motorcycle is fitted with a 800-cc D-16 engine and the suspension was an Öhlins TRSP25 48-mm “Through Rod” front fork with a TRSP44 rear shock absorber.

The bike had also received a new carbon airbox and a new electronics package designed to soften the savage throttle response lower down. A more sophisticated traction control system was also introduced, and engine revisions included a higher inertia and crankshaft to further tame the throttle response.

As MotoGP moves into a new era in 2012, Rossi’s GP11 exemplifies the evolution of the 800-cc D16 from the world-beating GP7 through until the end of this formula in 2011. The GP11 was the ultimate development of the D16 that provided Ducati their only MotoGP World Championship.

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The history of the Ducati 750 SS Corsa is pretty interesting as is strongly related to the famous Mike Hailwood.

Mike Hailwood’s comeback victory at the Isle of Man in 1978, 11 years after he had retired and at the age of 38, holds a warm spot in the heart of every Ducati fan. But mention Paul Smart at Imola in 1972, and one will generate even more enthusiasm. At that Italian racetrack on 23 April, 1972, 70,000 race fans watched underdog Ducati defeat the world’s best riders on what were previously assumed to be the world’s best bikes. The riders included world champion Giacomo Agostini, Phil Read, Cal Rayborn and Walter Villa competing in the inaugural 200-mile race, much like Europe’s Daytona, with more than $40,000 in prize money.

Agostini took off in the lead with Smart and Spaggiari behind him, but Smart passed him on lap four and Spaggiari a lap later. After that, the two Ducatis diced with each other until the finish—Spaggiari passing Smart but then running wide as he started to misfire, low on fuel. The Ducatis finished one-two at an average speed of 97.76 mph, with Smart, Spaggiari and Agostini sharing the fastest lap at 100.1 mph. The “green frame” Ducati 750 Super Sport had arrived.

However, it looked as though two-strokes were soon going to rule Moto GP, and Ducati switched the V-twin to endurance racing, which had no engine restrictions. By boring the cylinders to 86 mm and using 450 racing pistons, the 864-cc 900 SS was created. The new bike made its race-winning debut at Montjuich Park, Barcelona, where Benjamin Grau and Salvador Canellas won the 24 hours endurance race in July 1973.

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In 1968, the wide-case 350-cc Mark 3 Desmo was the fastest production Ducati one could buy, with 103 mph on tap, or 112 mph with a noisier megaphone pipe. There were several options: high touring bars instead of clip-ons and even a racing kit with more radical camshaft, fairing a range of main jets and megaphone exhaust.

The bike was unmistakable with early examples having twin filler caps on the fuel tank and the white-faced Veglia tachometer on the right fork crown. The fuel tank was chrome plated on the sides, with a metal Ducati badge, and the headlight and fenders were chrome plated.

When the 450-cc engine was introduced in 1969, the range was redesigned somewhat, with a square-slide Dell’Orto carburettor replacing the previous SS1, a single filler cap fuel tank and individual speedometer and tachometer, instead of the headlight-mounted speedo in the 1968 model. A cut-off Silentium exhaust silencer replaced the bullet exhaust.

Cycle magazine tested the 250-, 350- and 450-cc models imported to the U.S. and reported that the 250-cc and 450-cc engines had a wide power band, while the 350-cc was basically a bottle-rocket, with power coming on with a rush at 6,500 rpm. Not surprisingly, the 450 cc was fastest through a quarter-mile at 16.6 seconds, but the 350 did it in 17.6 seconds, and that was cut to 15.15 seconds with a megaphone exhaust, suggesting that the Silentium pipe restricted the bikes performance significantly.

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By 1991, the Ducati 888 had won 23 World Superbike races and had only been beaten once. Doug Polen on his Fast by Ferracci bike won 17 races and even held the outright lap record at Jarama for a significant period. World Super Bike had become a huge spectator sport, with recognisable machines that riding fans could relate to, and the 888-cc V-twin Ducatis were dominating the 750-cc four-cylinder Kawasakis, Hondas and Suzukis.

Giancarlo Falappa joined the Ducati team in 1990 after a year with Bimota where he finished 6th in the WSB series, scoring three wins. Known as the “Lion of Jesi” (pronounced “Lesi”) for his hometown, Falappa was a bold and charismatic rider, and 1992 would be his best year in WSBK.

Falappa won four of the 26 WSB races in 1992, in a fearsome riding style developed in motocross, where he got his start. Many of Falappa’s best performances can be seen on video, including leaning on Scott Russell in a corner towards the end of the first race at Spa as well as the close-run battle with future champion Carl Fogarty at Assen, which he followed with a wheelie victory lap.

Hit the jump for more information on the Ducati 888 SBK Corsa.

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A classic 1974 Ducati 750 SS Corsa was presented to an auction by a private seller. The bike has an estimated price of € 40.000 - € 60.000 and was prepared at Reparto Corse Ducati with the help of Franco Farne and is Carlo Saltarelli’s own 750 SS which he campaigned as a privateer in both 1974 and 1975. The model was painted grey in 1974, then carrying race number 43, and then repainted white and red, carrying number 23.

The frame and engine numbers suggest this machine left the factory as a 750GT and was up-rated to the competition specification in period. The comprehensive specification includes Marzocchi front forks, adjustable rear Marzocchi shocks, Scarab brakes, Veglia competition tachometer, Tommaselli handlebars, front oil cooler, competition exhaust, competition camshafts, twin Dell’Orto PHM 40-mm carburettors, lightweight clutch, lightweight pistons and Borrani rims.

Hit the jump for more information on the Ducati 750 SS Corsa’s history.

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A reserve bike prepared by NCR for Hailwood in the 1979 was put on sale by a private owner with an estimated price of €20.000-€30.000. The body of the bike was NCR, the engine was up-rated, but the frame was a standard 900 SS.

The bike has Brembo brakes, Marzocchi forks and Marzocchi rear shocks. It has a Veglia competition tachometer, twin Dell’Orto PHM 40-mm carburettors, front oil cooler, Campagnolo wheels oil pressure gauge, Verlicchi handlebars and light clutch.

All enthusiasts know the story of Mike Hailwood’s return to the Isle of Man TT races in 1978 and his success on the Steve Wynne Ducati 900 SS, which led to Ducati’s first World Championship.

At 110.62 mph, Hailwood broke Phil Read’s lap record by nine mph on the way to an immensely popular victory. He followed up with a win at Mallory Park the next weekend, a crash at Donington and a 3rd place at Silverstone against much faster opposition. Ducati was thrilled with the TT result and promised to build Mike Hailwood replicas and also give Hailwood a factory bike for the 1979 TT.

Hailwood tested the 1979 F1 bike at Misano but crashed before any changes could be made, cracking two ribs. After numerous delays, Ducati sent two NCR endurance race bikes to England; one was an endurance machine, and the other was a TT1 variant with a wet clutch engine. Wynne tried numerous modifications—even fitting the 1978 frame—but the bikes could not produce enough power and handled poorly. The best Hailwood could do was 5th place in the TT, and he declined to ride the endurance bike in any other races.

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The mid-’70s were not kind to Ducati. The company discontinued the excellent 250/350/450 singles and 750 round-case GT, Sport and Super Sport and tinkered with clumsy parallel twins, as well as the valve-spring 860GT and 900GTS. This left die-hard customers to kick-start the brutal 900 Super Sport Desmo twin for the Ducati experience. Surely, there had to be some middle ground… That finally emerged in 1978 with the Darmah 900 Sport Desmo, designed by Tartarini, and it became the company’s mainstay for five years. It was a detuned 900 SS, with smaller carbs, an electric start, two-up seat, Bosch electronic ignition, Nippon Denso gauges, warning lights and Bosch headlight and indicators. Best of all, the price was very competitive with the Japanese bikes.

Another twist appeared in 1979 when the Darmah SS was introduced. With handsome two-tone paint, it was only made from 1979-81. The 900 SS Darmah is a collectible machine today and its estimated price is €8.000-€10.000.

Specifications: 864 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin, five speeds.


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