Ducati Desmosedici

Ducati Desmosedici

Posted on by Maxx Biker 2

MotoGP has long inspired competing manufacturers to implement racing technologies on their road-going motorcycles, but nobody believed (although everybody thought at the idea at least once) that a MotoGP bike will ever be turned into a road-legal one and be sold to those willing to pay the big bucks. Ducati was the first, and currently only, to break the ice in 2007 with the Desmosedici RR, which was derived from the Desmosedici GP6 Grand Prix motorcycle, and in 2009 the world is still amazed of this even being possible, not to mention the bike’s evolution.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

Ducati has reserved episode four of their Desmosedici Documentary to tires, which are provided by Bridgestone and are called Battlax BT- 01. Specially developed for the Ducati Desmosedici RR, the tires are the closest ones in production to those found on Ducati MotoGP bikes such Bridgestone Firestone Europe Product Manager, Guido Podevyn explains.

See videos after the jump.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

After the first and second episodes of the Desmosedici RR series, through which the Italian company Ducati gives a detailed lowdown on its most exclusive motorcycle by illustrating the conception and development of the Desmosedici RR project in the words of the key people behind it, providing a not-to-be-missed tribute to the most esoteric of the Bologna-made machines, it is now the turn of Paolo Neviani.

Technical director of RIBA Composites, company that is specialized in composite materials, his role is to explain and widely present the reason why carbon fiber is used to manufacture the Desmosedici RR tail.

See videos after the jump.

Source: motoflash
Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

While the first episode of Ducati’s Desmosedici RR documentary presented the processes of tuning, testing and then tuning again the MotoGP replica before calling it done and ready to hit whatever the future owner wants, the second episode slips on the technical details path, a delight for all engineer ears out there.

It seems that Ducati has worked so much at this project that they wouldn’t want the world to consider it “just another one of those fast bikes” and simply admit that they are built on the track so they provide the kind of material presented at official presentations.

See videos after the jump.

Posted on by Maxx Biker

Realizing that the $72,500 asking price for the Ducati Desmosedici RR excludes him from the start, a French Ducati fan took matters into his own hands and turned his Monster SR4 into what appears to be a bulkier Desmosedici RR, but without the astonishingly high retail price. The passionate builder also took its time and photographed the bike during the different stages of development and this is how we got the pleasure to share these with you.

Although technically it remains as the Monster’s L-Twin was preferred over a 200 bhp V4 Desmosedici RR engine, the fiberglass fairing and gas tank, the windscreen and headlights as well as the fake underseat exhaust are all testimony of passionate work and detailed craftsmanship.

I reckon that copying isn’t the solution and that he could have gone for something original, but otherwise the guy wouldn’t have ridden a DesmoMonster and, apparently, that’s what he wished the most.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

Ducati North America has announced that additional units of the Desmosedici RR MotoGP replica will be produced and addressed to the market in cause.

Ducati NA announces additional units of the Desmosedici RR MotoGP replica

So few lucky riders who remained with a bitter taste in their mouths after closing out of the ordering process now have the opportunity to get their hands on one of those pre-sold units which meanwhile became again available.

Press release after the jump

Source: autoblog
Posted on by Maxx Biker

If you did so, the answer to your question could come by reading an article published in the online edition of the New-York Times. Entitled “A Motorcycle For Moguls”, the article refers to those bikes that you an me can’t have, but which often make a good subject of talk for us.

Ever wondered why limited edition motorcycles exist?

Outrageously-priced two-wheelers such as the MV Agusta F4CC ($120,000) or the Ducati Desmosedici RR ($72,500) make you wonder about the technology and materials implemented, but as you hear that you can get the same rush on bikes that are eight time cheaper, you really don’t know what to think. Has the world turned upside down?

The answer is strongly related to each manufacturer’s marketing strategy, which in this cases tends to be the same: produce 100 limited edition models and sell them to those who want to feel special and satisfied of not being rich for nothing. Then the limited edition model’s success will reflect on the simple models of that same manufacturer (something that tells me they’re pretty much the same) and sales numbers increase, leaving everybody satisfied, even those who can’t afford the one with the long figure as MSRP.

Free advertising is also a thing of great importance as limited edition motorcycles not only fill up pockets with money paid on them, but with those saved from paid advertising. So next time you read about a limited edition model, think about these aspects and notice how you’ll start appreciating normal bikes more. But until then, read the New-York Times article.

Posted on by Maxx Biker

You’ve seen it racing on the track between 2003 and 2006 and now the time has come for it to be seen on the streets. No, it’s not Jay (although he’s riding), it’s the new Ducati Desmosedici RR that he just bought and has the pleasure of presenting to us today.

Take the short time and go through Jay’s brief history on Ducati bikes and then enjoy CEO’s Michael Lock presentation and the full test run I was talking about earlier. What a great bike! It really does miracles in the right hands of this “58 year old guy”.



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