enduro

enduro

Posted on by Sulthoni

The Yamaha WR250R is a direct descendent of the WR250F – a rugged motorbike designed only for off road. Unlike its sibling the WR250R has a more serene character and can be used without problems for both street and dirt riding.

The first street legal Yamaha WR250R was launched in 2008 and since then it continued to impress the dual purpose bike lovers with its superior performances.

After four years, the WR250R’s design remained almost unchanged and all you get for 2013 is a new set of graphics.

The bike features a competent alloy chassis which is combined with a reliable 250 cc liquid-cooled DOHC engine. The engine is combined with two titanium intake valves and two steel exhausts.

To help the bike deal with harsh terrains with poise, Yamaha gave it a special asymmetrical swingarm which comes with cast aluminum crossmembers, extruded arms and a 22mm rear axle. Furthermore a fully adjustable 46mm fork provides 10.6 inches of wheel travel.

Hit the jump for more information on the Yamaha WR250R

Posted on by Sulthoni

The dual sport character of the Yamaha XT250 has conquered a lot of fans. To keep its fans loyal, Yamaha came up with a series of small upgrades for the 2013 model year. The biggest change is represented by the new fuel injection system which replaces the earlier model’s 33mm Teikei carburetor. Yamaha claims that thanks to the new fuel injection system the bike offers an improved fuel economy of 76 mpg - a 3 mph improvement when compared to the old 73 mpg rating.

The bike is propelled by a 249cc air-cooled SOHC engine married to a five speed transmission. The engine remained unchanged, but it received a larger gas tank to improve the bike’s range (2.6 gallons versus 2.4 gallons on last year’s model). Another important modification was the replacement of the old CDI (Capacitive Discharge Ignition) ignition system with a new TCI (Transistor Controlled Ignition) technology.

The suspensions remained unchanged and the bike continues to sit on a 35mm telescopic fork with 8.9-inches of travel and a swingarm with rebound-adjustable monoshock with 7.1-inches of travel.

As far as breaking power goes, the 2013 Yamaha XT250 is equipped with 245mm front and 203mm rear disc brakes.

Hit the jump for more information on the Yamaha XT250

Posted on by Sulthoni

If you’re sick and tired of the not-so-comfortable sport bikes and you’re searching for a bike that offers a higher level of comfort without compromising all the fun, you should take a closer look at the Kawasaki KLR 650. Thanks to its split personality, the Kawasaki KLR 650 feels comfortable around town but also on the savage, muddy terrains. It’s tough, but flexible character helped the KLR 650 gain a pretty good reputation in the dual sports segment.

The bike is powered by a liquid-cooled DOHC 651cc engine which is easy to control across the power band and smoother than expected. Needles to say, that the wide power band and the smart gear ratios will help you deal well with both low and high speed driving.

The stopping power is assured by a dual-piston caliper gripping a 280mm petal-style disc in the front, and a 240mm petal-style disc squeezed by a single-piston caliper in the rear.

Hit the jump for more information on the Kawasaki KLR 650.

Looking at the svelte frame of the Kawasaki D-Tracker 125 , you would think that its interactive street style is all style with minimal substance. But that’s not how the D-Tracker 125 works.

This sports bike is all kinds of business; it comes with a big-bike style FI system with a separate injector and throttle body. With this type of system, the D-Tracker 125 is able to lessen the chance of air ingestion to make it perfect for the sports riding.

On top of that, the bike has chassis components that has been specifically prepared for the 125 cm³ class. The D-Tracker 125 also has advanced proportions that adds a positive value to its sharp appearance.

Suffice to say, due to the chassis components that were specifically designed for the 125 cm3 class, the D-TRACKER 125 brings a lightweight and compact package with a ride experience that befits the Kawasaki name. Enjoy your riding with this interactive and impressive style D-Tracker 125.

Find out more about the Kawasaki D-Tracker 125 after the jump.

The Yamaha TDM900/A is a universal performer, a bike that was created to allow riders to handle whatever you throw at it. Whether its the long distance touring trips with a passenger or just your everyday commute through city streets, the TDM900/A is as versatile a bike as anything in Yamaha’s line-up.

In terms of style, the bike’s aggressive styling is typical of Yamaha street bikes: sporty, aggressive, and oozing with attitude. On top of that, comfort was also taken into consideration, particularly the weather-beating upper fairing and the built-in luggage rack.

At the heart of the TDM900/A is a powerful 897cc forward-inclined parallel 2-cylinder, liquid-cooled, 4-stroke, DOHC engine. The flexible, big-twin engine is a testament to the kind of power it boasts. Add in superb traction due to the 270-degree crankshaft, a wonderfully responsive and forgiving suspension, and a high-tech braking system, and you have a bike that’s ready for whatever you throw at it.

Find out more about the Yamaha TDM900/A after the jump.

The Yamaha XT660X has a history very few bikes in its range can boast. Inspired by the legendary XT bikes that ran the Paris-Dakar desert rally, the street version XT660X offers the kind of performance that lets you conquer the urban jungle like no other bike.

The XT660 has been fitted with Supermotard technology, complete with a 660cc single cylinder, liquid-cooled, 4-stroke, SOHC engine that offers throaty performance. With the performance theme, the new bike benefits from a changed cylinder head. The strengthening measures include a new anodized forged aluminum piston which dropped in a ceramic composite plated cylinder.

Furthermore, the fuel injection system derives its supply from a 15 liter tank while a pair of stainless steel mufflers expels the gases.

More than just being a road warrior, the Yamaha XT660X was built with a new diamond style frame that offers reduced trail. Moreover, a stiffer swingarm helps cope with the side loadings and can be achieved with the fitment of the sticky Pirelli 160/60-17 rear hoop.

All told, the Yamaha XT660X is a true Yamaha street fighter, one that boasts enough power and performance capabilities to make it worth buying.

Find out more about the Yamaha XT660X after the jump.

Posted on by Sulthoni

Anyone can enjoy an impressive riding experience with this Yamaha Dual Purpose TW200 because of its long list of impressive features and comfortable ride.

At the heart of this vehicle, you’ll find a 196cc air-cooled, four-stroke single, smooth-shifting five-speed transmission with manual clutch, internal engine counterbalance, and a maintenance-free CDI ignition system to ensure accurate, dependable spark for peak engine performance at all rpm.

Furthermore, the chassis includes the 33mm telescopic front fork with 6.3 inches of travel, lightweight box section swingarm and single rear shock with 5.9 inches of travel, and the hydraulic front disc brake that ensures better stopping power with less effort.

To get a better comfortable position, you’ll be provided with the big fat tires along with a low seat and compact chassis.You’ll also get the standard instrumentation including a speedometer with odometer and resettable tripmeter as well as indicator lights for neutral, high beam, and turn signals.

Find out more about the Yamaha TW200 after the jump.

The Ducati 125 Scrambler was one of those period bikes from the Italian automaker that truly gained a sizable following. First born with a 125 cc SOHC narrow case engine, the model evolved into a 160 cc before topping out at 250 cc, which, incidentally, also came with Marzochi forks.

The 1970 125 Scrambler pictured here is particularly important because it is one of the models that came with a 160 cc SOHC single engine and mated to a four-speed transmission - all while continuing to use the "125" name. As a small and relatively lightweight machine, the 125 Scrambler’s appeal is that it’s one bike that you wouldn’t mind getting down and dirty with.

The particular 1970 Ducati 125 Scrambler that was auctioned at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco was an unrestored model that came with its original orange and black paint scheme. The estimated bid price for the bike was around €3,000 - €4,000, which is around $3,800 - $5,200 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $6,061.

There was a point in Ducati’s history when everything wasn’t so hunky-dory for the Italian automaker. Back in the 70’s, Ducati was in the middle of one of the worst stretches in its history, having failed to catch on to the 250-, 350-, and 450-cc markets.

Nevertheless, Ducati soldiered on, and from 1975-1977, they were able to build a bike - the 125 Regolarita Six Days - that ended up being one of the rarest Ducati models in history.

The scarcity of this bike doesn’t have anything to do with the modest power train - a 124 cc two-stroke single engine that’s mated to a six-speed transmission - nor does it have anything to do with the relatively heavy frame either (it weighs 238 lbs!).

People are going crazy for this model today because the bike was cancelled relatively early in its production cycle, making it one of the most difficult bikes to get a hold of.

The bike had an expected auction price of €3,500 - €4,500, which is around $4,500 - $5,800 based on current exchange rates, when it went up for auction at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco. Actual selling price was $8,333.

There’s no question that the Brammo Enertia was built for one purpose: produce grins for newbie and experienced motorcyclists.

This bike is poised to become a popular ride, thanks to some of the best features you’ll find on the market, particularly a promise from Brammo that the Enertia comes with a quiet sound and zero-emissions.

All that can be achieved by a tuned exhaust barking a staccato note from a high-compression engine with the Enertia’s whirring 72-volt, brushless DC motor and 428 gauge DID chain. Sprockets are practically all you hear other than the wind rushing past your helmet. This feature fits the people who don’t like the noise.

Brammo’s zero-emission bike is promising to be a real motorcycle that offers a deep hue of environmentally-friendly greenness, making up for any apparent performance shortcomings. Even if its juice comes from coal-fired power grids, its pollution footprint is but a fraction of catalytic-converter-equipped motorcycles, which is always a good thing.

Find out more about the Brammo Enertia after the jump.


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