Motorcycle News

Posted on by Sulthoni

Honda decided to add a few upgrades to its sporty VFR1200F. The 2013 version keeps the same big capacity, 1236cc 4-cilinder OHC 4-stroke, liquid cooled engine, but Honda added a few tweaks to improve its performance and make it more efficient and refined. After the upgrades, the engine is able to deliver a maximum output of 111 hp at 7500 rpm and 11 Nm of torque at 5500rpm.

Apart from the improved engine, the fuel tank capacity has also received some attention and its capacity been increased from 18 liter to 19 liter. The new bike is also fitted with a fresh instrument panel which displays information about the distance, fuel, efficiency and speed.

The 2013 Honda VFR1200F is offered in two variants, namely the VFR standard and VFR DCH (Dual Clutch Transmission). The most important difference between these two models is their efficiency. The VFR model, can ride a distance of 22, 5 km using one liter of fuel, while the VFR DCH travels 24 km using the same amount of fuel.

As far as pricing goes, the VFR1200F costs $20.000 and the VFR1200F Dual Clutch Transmission is priced at $23.000.

Posted on by Sulthoni

Yamaha is working on its first electric bike and has already revealed the first details. The new model has the potential to raise the standards of e-bikes higher than ever as it could be the first one that shows how stability and efficiency can be joined together in one motorcycle.

The new Yamaha EC-Miu Electric Concept uses two wheels in the back and one wheel on the front, so we can expect to perfect balance and stability. The company says that the concept was designed especially for women and puts safety and ergonomics on the first place.

The Yamaha EC-Miu Electric Concept can be recharged using the same G-Station charging stations used by any regular electric motorcycle. The Yamaha EC-Miu Electric Concept is also equipped with Wi-Fi capability which will help the riders use smartphone-based navigation and telematics services.

The Yamaha EC-Miu Electric Concept has made its official debut at the Tokyo Motor Show in November 2011.

Posted on by Serafim 1

At this year’s EICMA Motor SHOW, BMW Motorrad President Stephan Schaller announced that the company will launch a new bike powered by a fresh air cooled “boxer” engine. The new bike will arrive at the beginning of 2013 and was especially designed to mark the "90 years of BMW Motorrad" anniversary.

BMW’s adventure in the world of motorcycles began back in 1923. Their first bike, the BMW R 32 was a strong and reliable model, powered by a capable air cooled 2-cylinder 4 stroke “boxer” unit which came with longitudinally mounted crankshaft and shaft drive to the rear wheel. The bike managed to gain a pretty good reputation and was especially appreciated for its reliability, built quality and the nimble engine.

The new model will host a series of classic traits borrowed from the old BMW bikes. The German manufacturer added that its multifaceted concept will feature an “emotional styling” and will be equipped with a series of modern technologies.

Posted on by Serafim

After has managed to solve its financial issues, Moto Morini has managed to revive from the ashes. However, the manufacturer didn’t appeared at this year’s EICMA, instead has decided to launch the 2013 Milan model.

The new generation is based on the earlier models, but it doesn’t come with any impressive technologies of upgrades. Most of the changes were made to improve the bike’s reliability and there are also a few small tweaks to help it stay on the same line with its rivals.
For the moment Morini didn’t revealed any price specifications for the 2013 Milan, but judging by the price of its current models, it shouldn’t be too high.

At the moment Morini’s lineup includes the Corsaro, Granpasso and Scrambler. We’ll keep you posted as soon as we have more info.

Kawasaki is celebrating an important milestone in their company’s history, paying homage to the 40th anniversary of its Z family of motor bikes.

The Japanese motorcycle brand has released the Limited Edition Z40 Chronograph, which will be launched at the Intermot Motorcycle Show in Germany on October 2, 2012. The watch bears some unique features, a lot of which were inspired by Kawasaki’s Z family.

The stainless steel composition of the Z40 Chronograph was made by Austrian manufacturer Hirsch. The design carries some inspiration from the 1972 Z1, complete with an iconic paint and graphic treatment. Even the face of the watch features Kawasaki’s original logo wit a Z1 DOHC side panel badge. On the other side, you’ll see a Z40 logo with the watch edition number, a true testament to its special edition designation. Last, the Z40 Chronograph also has a four-dial chronograph/tachymeter function and is water resistant up to 5 ATM.

Only 903 pieces of this watch will be made with each priced at €207.06 ($267.45 at current exchange rates). If you’re wondering why the ambiguous number, 903 represents the engine size of the Z1: 903cc. Each watch will carry a certificate of authenticity and will be made available exclusively to the European market.

Ever since "Back to the Future" brought us the “hoverboard” by Mattel and the flying Delorean , we have been absolutely obsessed with hover technology. As of late, the hovering market has taken a bit of a back seat to alternative fuels, but it’s still alive and well. Now, Aerofex has posted a video displaying just how serious the hover industry still is.

In this video, you get to see an actual working model of a hover bike. The term “working” in this case mean that it hovers, moves, turns, and has the necessary yaw control to keep it all in check. By the looks of the video – and the lack of audio – we can tell that this “working” model is very far from ever being a production item.

The lacking audio is the most telling item that this hover bike is a long way off. We are willing to bet our last dollar that this thing sounds like your standing next to a twin-prop plane at take-off. If you’ve never had the joy of hearing that noise, we’ll just assure you that it is damn near deafening.

Regardless of its likely inefficient noise control, it is still awesome to see a hovering bike that actually flies in somewhat of a controlled manner without spinning wildly out of control. Now all they need to do is master manufacturing those cool metal pads on the bottom of the hover board that made it hover and make that awesome “whoop-whoop-whoop” sound.

Check out the video and maybe add your own “whoop-whoop-whoop” for the real futuristic effect... If you’re at work or within listening distance of anyone else, we strongly suggest avoiding the sound effects, though.

Source: Gizmag

One of the most difficult things any racer will ever experience is keeping their concentration when they know they’re about to win a race. Some refuse to let the moment get the better of them until they see the checkered flag, but some just get a little too excited too soon.

That’s exactly what happened to rider Riccardo Russo who thought that he had just won a race despite having yet to complete the final lap. As you can see in this hilarious video, Russo immediately goes into full celebration mode as he crosses the line heading into the final lap, thinking that he had already won it. Despite seeing his other competitors still engaged in full race mode, Russo pumps his fist, stands on his bike, and at least according to the announcer, takes off his helmet to acknowledge the crowd, thinking that the race was over.

Unfortunately for him, he not only surrendered the win in the most inexplicable fashion, but he missed out on what turned out to be a scintillating finish that went down the wire. Even more perplexing is the apparent lack of awareness in his surroundings. Didn’t he realize that there was no checkered flag waving on the lap he thought he had won?

Talk about the ultimate brain fart.

Source: You Tube

Ever come upon a product that you can’t point your finger at as far as what its actual purpose is?

Here we have the Alomar Motorcycle Jacket-Backpack, a fashion accessory that converts from a protective and stylish jacket to a durable backpack and back into a jacket at the slightest of ease.

How exactly does all of this simple transformation work?

The Alomar is a jacket that’s made out of 600 Denier Polyester Nylon - the same material space ships are made from - and has been padded with dual Teflon shoulder and elbow pads. The water-resistant polyester, in particular, allows the Alomar to be used in a myriad of weather conditions. It also has adjustable drawstrings and a pocket that can be accessible through both the jacket and backpack orientation, providing enough space to stow anything from laptops, iPads, or any other flat item you’d want to carry.

Everything about the Alomar speaks to an innovation that’s both practical and useful for riders. We’re not quite sure about the weight - 4 lbs - but if you can carry that weight over your shoulder, plus the added weight from the items you’re carrying, then you have yourself a multi-purpose jacket that you can take with you anywhere you want to go.

Source: Fundable

Anyone who rides a motorcycle knows that it is always safest to wear a full set of leathers – jacket, gloves, pants and boots – when you ride. Believe it or not, leathers actually can be the only thing protecting your skin from nasty road burn, and can even save your life in some severe cases. Well, some people tend to forget, or just feel silly wearing them – myself included – and we need a little reminding that everything is better in leather.

Well, with England getting ready for national Ride to Work Day on June 18th, local TV stations are running ads reminding bikers of safety, including the importance of leather. Instead of giving us a graphic video about the dangers of road rash, one commercial goes exactly the opposite ways by using a double entendre to burn the need for leather in our minds.

The opening scene is bad enough, using key phrases like “doing it,” “leather,” and “wearing protection” at various points. Only to find out that [ha ha] we’re talking about motorcycle leathers protecting you while you “do it” [ride a motorcycle]. Well, at least somewhat… The last scene takes the entendre the other direction, and… Well, you’ll just have to watch the above video to find out.

Go ahead and have a few LOLs on us!

Posted on by JeffPerez

Sure motorcycles look cool, but most aren’t really that interesting unless they have a deadly amount of power shoved into them, or they’re on fire. This one on the other hand is pretty special; it’s the only bike ever to be badged as a Ferrari.

You may ask yourself, how did a Ferrari motorbike come to be? Well, out of pure generosity of Piero Ferrari. In a letter to Mr. Ferrari Jr., David Kay of David Kay Engineering wanted to build a Ferrari badged one-of-a-kind bike as a memorial piece to his late father. After a read over the undoubtedly touching letter, Piero Ferrari granted permission in the form of his signature to David Kay to build the memorable two-wheeler.

Four years later and 3,000 man hours, the built from scratch 900cc Ferrari motorcycle was born. The entire body was shaped from aluminum and molded to what David thought a Ferrari factory motorcycle would look like. Although the bike didn’t get much use, as it was seen as more of a personal expression of art rather than a road-going bike, it came with 105-hp and an estimated top speed of 164 mph.

So where is this one and only now? Well after some not so successful sales, and price tags of over £250K, the bike finally made its way to the auction block in May 2012 where it sold at a price of £85,000 ($166,000) to some lucky Brit.


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