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Ducati

Ducati motorcycles

Posted on by Sulthoni

A classic 1993 Ducati Troll Supertwin was auctioned with an estimated price of €10.000-€15.000. After it was launched on the market, the motorcycle managed to gain pretty fast the “icon” status and conquered the heart of many riders. It is powered by a 904 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin unit mated on a six speeds transmission.

Built for the Sound of Singles series in Europe, only 67 were constructed from 1993-97, and Robert Holden placed 2nd in the Isle of Man TT on one. The “look” was so striking that Dutch company Troll offered a Supertwin Troll kit for your 900 SS—you provided the engine, and Troll came up with a rolling chassis, stylish body work and frame. However, it was very expensive, and only 13 were built. The bike on offer is No. 1 and the only one constructed with Ohlins suspension. In bright yellow, it is as new and an unrepeatable opportunity for the serious collector.

Hit the jump for more pictures of the Ducati Troll Supertwin.

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The Ducati 500L Pantah Desmo was auctioned with an estimated price of €3.000-€4.000. At the heart of the motorcycle lies a 499 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine which is mated on a five speeds transmission. The motorcycle has a pretty interesting history behind it and is one of Ducati’s iconic models.

At the end of the 1970s, Ducati was in trouble. The vertical twins weren’t selling, so management went to designer Fabio Taglioni to see if he had any ideas. He handed them plans for another ground-breaking V-twin, based on his 1973 Armaroli DOHC Grand Prix racer.

The new bike was the belt-drive camshaft 500-cc V-twin Desmo Pantah, and its racing version, the TT2, would win four Formula 2 world championships between 1981-84. Taglioni’s new engine was smaller and quieter than the outgoing bevel-drive twins and was fitted in a trellis frame. The belt drive would be a feature of Ducati engines from that day forth. The Pantah’s electronics were by Nippon Denso, brakes were by Brembo, and its top speed was about 120 mph. The bike on offer is in good original condition with two-into-one exhaust, and many collectors prefer the early, smoother fairing.

Hit the jump for more pictures of the Ducati 500SL Pantah Desmo.

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An old Ducati 748 Biposto was auctioned with an estimated price of €3.000-€4.000 (the bike was sold at a final price of €2.925). The motorcycle’s specifications included a 748 cc DOHC liquid-cooled Desmo V-twin paired with a six speeds transmission. The bike on offer was an original example in red with gold wheels.

The Ducati 748 was launched in 1995 as the smaller sister to the 916 and eligible to compete in the 600 Supersport class against the 600-cc four-cylinder Japanese racers. It was available as an SP and a dual seat Biposto; the SP generated 104 horsepower at 11,000 rpm, while the Biposto used milder Strada cams and produced 98 horsepower. The SP topped out at 154 mph, the Biposto at 151 mph. A number of riders have observed that the 748 engine is actually sweeter and likes to rev more freely than the torquier 916, which probably accounted for the model’s popularity.


Hit the jump for more pictures of the Ducati 748 Biposto.

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A classic Ducati 900 Super Sport was auctioned with an estimated price of €2.800-€3.800 and was sold with at a final price of €1.755.

In a series of strokes, Ducati had divided its liquid-cooled, fuel-injected, four-valve competition department from its two-valve, air-cooled street bike fans. The 900 SS was so well sorted that it changed very little until it was replaced in 1997. The 900 Super Sport remains a definitive Ducati experience, and many have been kept for lengthy periods by proud owners.

The troublesome Weber carburettor was replaced with Mikuni flat slides in 1990, and after this tweak performance almost matched the fuel injected 907 IE Paso. The rake was steepened to 25 degrees, a shorter swing-arm reduced the wheelbase, and longer rear shock quickened the steering. Showa adjustable front forks replaced the Marzocchis, and bigger Brembo disc brakes were fitted. The clip-on bars were raised and the foot-pegs lowered.

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A classic Ducati 750 Super Sport was put on sale at an auction with an estimated price of €15.000-€20.000. This bike is in nice condition with good paint and chrome and alloy wheel rims.

When the 401 round-case 750 Ducati Super Sports were completed in 1974, two-strokes looked like they were going to dominate Formula 750, with the Yamaha TZ 700 leading the way. Ducati elected to contest endurance racing, which did not restrict engine size. They bumped up the 750 SS engine by using a pair of 450 racing pistons to create an 864-cc motor—the 900 SS.

In 1975, both the 900 SS and 750 SS used the square-case engine, with the 860 sleeved down to make the 750 SS. They were basically the same bare-bones production racers as the 1974 models, with right-side shift, a small CEV taillight, fibreglass gas tank, Conti pipes, open bellmouth carburettors and no turn signal provisions.

Only 246 ‘900 Super Sports’ and 249 ‘750 Super Sports’ were built, and an amazing 198 of the 500 went to Australia. The 1976 Super Sports would be civilised, with left-side shifting, steel gas tanks, carburettor air cleaners and quieter Lanfranconi mufflers (though Contis would usually be included in the crate).

Any 1975 750 Super Sport would be a rare find indeed these days, and this model is always sought after by serious Ducati collectors.

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As the 1970s wound down for Ducati, designer Fabio Taglioni found himself back in favour and produced a rabbit out of the hat. It was the 500-cc belt-drive camshaft V-twin Desmo Pantah, whose racing sibling, the TT2, would hand Ducati four Formula 2 world championships between 1981-84. Taglioni’s design was significantly smaller and quieter than the outgoing bevel-drive twins, as well as much cheaper to build. When the engine was boosted to 600 cc in 1980, the few teething troubles were solved, and the 600SL gained a better fairing and a hydraulic clutch. Electronics were by Nippon Denso, brakes were by Brembo, and top speed was increased slightly from the 500SL, at around 124 mph.

One of these classic models was put on sale with an estimated price of €3.500-€5.000. The bike on offer is finished in the distinctive silver fairing with red inserts and gold Campagnolo alloy rims, presented in good original condition aside from its modified fairing. At the heart of the motorcycle lies a 583 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine which sends power to the rear wheel through a five speeds.

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Japan was one of the biggest markets for Ducati in the 1980s but limited sport bikes to 400 cc, so smaller versions of the F1 were sold there as the F3 from 1986-88. A similar restriction in Italy was set at 350 cc, and a red and white F3 was sold there in, only available in 1986. The Japanese 400-cc F3 generated 45 horsepower, while the Italian 350 F3 made 42.5. Basic suspension was fitted to the little bikes: 35-mm Marzocchi forks and 260-mm dual discs with Brembo callipers. The two models each weighed 364 pounds, and the 350 F3 was tested at 110.8 mph, which is quite respectable.

A model of this type was auctioned with an estimated price of €4.000-€5.000. The motorcycle is a Special Edition in sound original condition, with a tasty red and white paint and a dual seat. Power comes from a 349 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin which is paired with a five speeds transmission.


Hit the jump for more pictures of the 2013 Ducati 350 F3 Edizione Speciale.

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A unique Ducati 750 SS Corsa was auctioned with an estimated price of €40.000-€60.000. The bike was ridden by former Ducati test rider Carlo Saltarellie who partnered with four-time world champion Walter Villa in the Misano 12 Hour Endurance race in 1978.

The Ducati 750 SS Corsa is fitted with an Imola fairing and 1976 series NCR tank/seat unit. Power comes from a 750-cc Desmo V twin engine which remains one of the most significant two-wheeled designs ever created. The engine is mated on a five speed gearbox.

In terms of suspensions the Ducati 750 SS Corsa comes with Marzocchi special forks and Marzocchi adjustable rear shocks.

Other features include twin Dell’ Orto PHM 40-mm carburettors, a front oil cooler, endurance lights, competition exhaust, Veglia tachometer, lightweight clutch and flywheel. It has an original NCR frame steel “molibdeno.”

Hit the jump for more information on the Ducati 750 SS Corsa.

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The Ducati 916 was launched at the Milan Show in October 1993 and made even more of a splash than the Supermono did the year before. While the engine wasn’t significantly different from the 851, it was designed to be easier to service—which was a huge advance—and observers commented on the beautifully detailed workmanship. The engine developed 104.3 horsepower at 9,000 rpm, according to Cycle World, but improved aerodynamics made the 916 significantly faster, clocking 10.72 seconds for the quarter-mile at 130.62 mph and a top speed of 159 mph. The 916 won every magazine’s Bike of the Year award for 1994. The example on offer is a totally original and well-maintained example, in the less common and more attractive bright yellow colour, with gold wheels.

It is powered by a 916 cc liquid cooled DOHC Desmo V-twin engine which is paired with a six speed transmission and has an estimated price of 3.500-€5.000.

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With the bevel drive 900NCR losing its competitive edge, in 1980 Franco Farne developed two of the new belt-driven Pantahs for the Italian national junior championship. They were based on the standard SL frame but with Marzocchi suspension and red and yellow bodywork that looked like the 900NCR. The 583-cc Desmo twin developed 70 horsepower at 9,000 rpm, and the bike on offer here is one of those bikes, presented without its full race fairing.

Presented in good order, this particular bike has Marzocchi forks and shocks, adjustable rear shock absorber, Brembo brakes, racing exhaust and Campagnolo wheels. This bike came from Reparto Corse of Ducati and was purchased by Team Saltarelli and refitted for the 1981 race season, winning the Italian TT junior championship ridden by Amerigo Saltarelli, Carlo’s brother.

The model on offer has an estimated price of €18.000-€20.000 and is powered by a 597 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine paired with a five speeds transmission.

Hit the jump for more information on the Ducati 600 TT Pantah.


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