Kawasaki

Kawasaki motorcycles

Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

The Z2/750RS was one of Kawasaki’s highly appreciated inline-four nakeds and made the subject of many customization projects over the years and, as we have recently come to find, it can still work its magic. Modified by the Kouga branch of the Sanctuary workshop, this precise exemplar apparently retains most of its original features, but it is brought up to date especially in what the chassis is concerned.

Now built around a powdercoated and reinforced frame and featuring Yamaha XJR1200 suspension as well as Brembo brakes, the upgraded Kawi Z2 should handle much better and come to a hault almost instantaneously. Also, thanks to the Yoshimura-tuned Mikuni TMR-MJN38 carburetion and Nitro Racing exhaust with titanium silencers, the blueprinted and balanced engine that originally developed 69bhp at 9000rpm now responds better to acceleration and sounds racy.

Overall, this is a clean looking bike which, despite having a few good years on its back, only needed a quick upgrade in order to keep up with its modern siblings from most points of view. That’s why we love Japanese bikes so much.

Source: bikeexif
Posted on by Maxx Biker 2

The 2010 Kawasaki Z1000 is already one of the best Japanese nakeds around, but ways to make it better are always found either by riders individually or by tuners. These lasts have the habit of developing entire upgrade kits that set the bike miles away from its original state of new product that has just come out the factory gates.

Take the 2010 Roaring Toyz Kawasaki Z1000 case for example. The bike gets a set of Performance Machine wheels (17-inch front, 18-inch rear), 240-section rear tire, a custom-built braced swingarm and Brocks 4-2-1 exhaust, just to mention some of its most impressive new features.

The gold/silver paintjob does help at setting the bike apart from its standard siblings, but what we like the most about this project is the fact that it looks like that’s just the way Kawi did it in the first place. This is really one of those bikes that people see and ask “what is stock and what is aftermarket about it?” Click past the break to find out.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 3
1977 Billetproof Customs KZ 400 Café Racer

Take a look at this 1977 Kawasaki KZ400 in the small photo and at the veritable café racer above only to find that there are little similarities, enough to have you say we’re talking about two different bikes. But it is precisely the ease of transforming an old Japanese bike into a café racer what impresses us the most about this project.

Billetproof Customs bought the bike for $300. The reliable engine still ran good, so it was worth stripping everything off of it in order to see what can be done from a fresh start. Said and done. They started with the frame, which was seriously modified and then they built the wheels and brought in lowered front shocks and custom shortened rear shocks. The old Kawi was now 2 inches lower and got itself a much more aggressive stance also thanks to the shortened clubman bars.

The bodywork was next. A refurbished 1979 Suzuki GT 500 fuel tank found its place on top of the frame together with the one-piece seat and rear tail section, which were custom made out of fiberglass by the builder. The reconditioned engine was now ready to go back on and it was fed through a single carb instead of its original dual ones. Also, it now features custom made and wrapped exhaust pipes and so they obtained a retro look instead of the classy one that chrome would have given the bike.

After adding a disc front brake and custom drilling the rear drum as well as hiding the battery under the tail section, the bike was ready for painting. Like all the above mentioned, this was done by the manufacturer and olive drab was the color of choice. Other nice details worth mentioning are the headlight, bar end mirrors and speedo, taillight as well as the custom stitched seat in between. Hit the jump for a multitude of photos.

Source: jkvstudios
Posted on by Maxx Biker 3

Nobody would want to see an “Altered Rat” unless it’s the Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R special owned by Brian Johnson, who is a big fan of the rat bike style. The bike was done in the Altered Chrome Garage using the company’s own parts and it is the only one of its kind that we’ve seen so far.

We have to admit that this is truly an original idea and, in the end, what’s not to like about a wolf in sheep’s clothing.

This thing is like a rolling advert for junkyards, but don’t be fooled in thinking it’s a piece of crap. Imagine seeing this thing pass next to you doing 150mph.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 5

Police patrols are known to have favorite “haunting” spots and this has got to be it for the one in this video simply because of the easy “prey”. Take a look at this inexperienced Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R rider having the time of his life on Mullholland highway near Malibu when he is surprised by the cops during a high speed corner and makes the BIG mistake of hitting the front brake. See the shameful result in the video after the jump.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 4

They say you need to be a certain kind of biker in order to ride a trike and it is not hard to recognize the type as the biking crowd passes along, so hearing about a guy having turned a 2001 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-12R into a trike raises a few question marks regarding to what kind of rider would do that and why. A very special kind of rider let me tell you and also one who wants to have fun and feel a little safer on two wheels.

Simeon Hill is a brit who’s 155mph Kawi trike featuring a custom-built frame, a push-button gearshift system, Akrapovic exhaust, modified axle and differential from a Ford Sierra made it to Trike magazine. Sure, the 17-inch rear wheels with 235 x 50 tires also had much to do with the achievement, but mostly with what our man built it for. So let’s see what Hill has to say: ‘I built this trike to handle. I have turned a few heads and surprised many sportsbike riders on twisty Yorkshire and Lincolnshire roads. It’s taken me on local jaunts, weekend trips and longer trips around Europe, not only keeping up with my friends’ sportsbikes but also giving them a good run for their money.’

Posted on by Maxx Biker 2

While Kawasaki discontinued their 1990s Zephyr 1100, the bike remains popular among those with an affinity for large-displacement nakeds and it even got a 2010 makeover from the Japanese tuner Moriwaki. The bike looks gorgeous with the dark blue/yellow color scheme, but this is one of those cases when the “more than meets the eye” part is what really makes all the difference.

This thing is powered by a big bore 1258cc inline-four engine breathing out through a hand made exhaust system and developing a decent 110bhp. While bringing in a new clutch and suspension, Moriwaki also fitted their latest idea for a Kawi Zephyr with a computer designed, aluminum alloy swingarm in order to stiffen up the rear end as well as make possible the use of a 180 section rear wheel and tire.

Is it just us or this is the best looking Kawasaki Zephyr around?

Source: MCN
Posted on by Maxx Biker 4

There’s nothing like riding a large displacement tourer and when it comes to this, the Kawasaki Vulcan 2000 Classic LT is not only one of the best representatives of its class, but also the one featuring the biggest bore and stroke. So for 2010, the massive Vulcan designed for the long haul enhances its visual and makes sure that the engine is delivering power even smoother than before. Meanwhile, the simple Vulcan 2000 and the Vulcan 2000 Classic remain 2009 model years.

Posted on by Maxx Biker

After getting rid of the over passed Vulcan 1500 and coming up with an entire 1700cc lineup composed of classic, classic tourers and touring models offering riders the possibility to find the ideal model without going in another manufacturer’s dealership, we’re now talking about the amazing all-new Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 which concludes under the Classic, Classic LT, Nomad and Voyager, all 2010 model years.

Posted on by Maxx Biker

The 2010 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 model range takes the best from the world of cruisers and adjusts it to match the size, experience and demands of riders who are just starting out. Each of the three models, Classic, Classic LT and Custom are set to offer a different kind of riding experience and the new Special Edition version derived from the Custom model follows the trend towards Dark Custom motorcycles that Harley-Davidson started.


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