> 

2010 Star Roadliner

Posted on by

Basically a stripped down Stratoliner, Star’s 2010 Roadliner S qualifies as the ultimate boulevard cruiser not only because of the massive engine powering it, but also thanks to the glamorous styling and unique riding feel. Cumulating these incontestable qualities, this model has everybody going “yes, it’s a Star” and who are we to disagree?

Only the Roadliner S carries on to 2010 (the Roadliner Midnight remains a 2009 model year) and this cruiser is set to find the sweet spot of riders who prefer short and non-windy rides, but also that of those who feel like buying a base motorcycle and accessorize it as their hearts demand.

 

Introduction

Star Roadliner

Definitely one of the best representatives of Star Motorcycles, but also kind of positioned in a class of its own because of the unmatched design, the Roadliner S is sure to have a well kept recipe. To begin with, the 113-cubic-inch air-cooled 48-degree V-twin; pushrod OHV, 4 valves per cylinder motor is great at delivering roll-on torque and the best of it is that you don’t have to roll the throttle that much in order to be provided. Star has simply tuned the impressive powerplant to deliver the best of torque in between 2,500 – 3,000 rpm and what a great idea that was. The fuel-injection tuning and the Exhaust Ultimate Power Valve make sure the engine works brilliantly together with the five-speed gearbox so that any incursion down the boulevard would be so grunty than nobody would have troubles in spotting you passing.

As a rider, you would really need to like being in the center of attention for the simplest reason: this is a high-end product which looks, sounds and costs as such. Star’s characteristics are everywhere from the massive front headlight to the belt drive and two-into-one exhaust, indicating that it addresses to bikers found at the last of their evolutionary steps. Yet, with the seat being positioned only 27.8 inches from the ground and the engine being anything but boring, young rebel souls often find their place on the Roadliner and confess that the bike fits them like a glove.

Like any big bore cruiser, the Star Roadliner does weigh much (749 lbs wet), but unlike similar motorcycles, this one knows how to deal with this issue. With a low center of gravity and a near 50/50 weight distribution on the front and rear wheels, our bike only needs to be set into motion in order to lose the wale-like impression. The frame is made out of aluminum, while the suspensions offer good wheel travel (5.1 inches front and 4.3 inches rear) for those smooth and relaxing rides.

Stopping such a heavyweight motorcycle demands unleashing the front brake master cylinder with integrated lever onto the 298mm discs with the help of strong monoblock calipers. The single rear disc measures 320mm in diameter, which is almost as big as the belt drive pinion.

Star offers a long accessory list for both the 2010 Roadliner S and the 2009 Roadliner Midnight, meaning that it can be easily personalized and/or turned into a tourer.

 

Yamaha Roadliner History

 

Competition

The closest thing in performance and style to the Star Roadliner is probably the Suzuki C109R. This cruiser relies on a 108.8-cubic-inch liquid-cooled, DOHC, 54-degree V-twin engine that is as well fuel injected, but needs to move significantly more mass than Star’s as it weighs 838 lbs. Also massive and featuring smooth flowing lines the C109R is a serious and reliable motorcycle. It has a five-speed constant mesh transmission and shaft drive instead of belt on the Roadliner. The MSRP for Suzuki’s bad boy cruiser is $14,799 which is definitely competitive.

 Kawasaki Vulcan 2000 Classic LT


Kawasaki misses no chance to impress and in this case the Vulcan 2000 Classic is the appropriate thing to name. Featuring a monstrously big V-twin engine (125-cubic-inch) with eight valves per cylinder, it also delivers the best of torque (141 lb-ft) in the 2,500 – 3,000 rpm range (2,800 rpm, to be more precise). That is also due to the fuel injection system, which has long arrived on this model and turned the big cruisers category upside down. MSRP is $13,899 for now.

Honda VTX1800


Honda sticks to 2008 with their VTX1800 lineup and the “N” corresponsive model to the Roadliner has everything to stay in line. The 109.53-cubic-inches 52-degree V-twin, SOHC; three valves per cylinder engine is fuel-injected and implicit capable of making an impression even against the Vulcan. The classic looks with the deeply valanced fenders are there as well, so we’re waiting for that next model for no apparent reason. At $13,699, this bike is the cheapest in the crowd.

Exterior

Star Roadliner

Star’s goal when designing the Roadliner was a long cruiser with a low center of gravity and ideal weight distribution and those demands resulted into a 101.6-inch length, 6.1-inch ground clearance and 50/50 weight distribution on the wheels. They started from there and decided to actually have two models based on the different styling tweaks that designers imagined: the S and the Midnight models.

The 2010 Star Roadliner S lights up the atmosphere with its Deep Blue paintjob, but also thanks to the multitude of chromed components (switchgear, front brake and clutch master cylinders and levers, belt guard, fork and fork covers, handlebar clamps, shifter, front pulley cover, various engine covers and rear fender stay) and polished wheels.

Star Roadliner


The 2009 Star Roadliner Midnight shows a Raven paintjob with flames. This gives a nice and mysterious touch to this big piece of iron as not only the gas tank and fenders are covered in black, but most other pieces that are chromed on the S model.

Overall, both models look compact (yes, despite the great length) and mean, especially because of their knitted front fenders and big headlights. The 12-spoke wheels are nice too and so are the old-school taillights.

To some, it might seem just perfect to take for a ride, while to others it represents the starting point of a never ending personalization project.

 

2008 Yamaha Roadliner Test Ride

 

Price

Apparently, the base Roadliner model is the Midnight as Star prices it at $14,090, while the 2010 Roadliner S starts at $15,290.

Conclusion

Star Roadliner

No doubt about it, the 2010 Star Roadliner S is an exclusive piece of machinery that seems like being in a class of its own despite the strong competitors available on the market today. This is mostly the result of Yamaha making a brand of its own out of their cruising motorcycles and this is only the beginning.


SPECIFICATIONS

 

Engine and Transmission

Star Roadliner

Type: 113-cubic-inch (1854cc) air-cooled 48° V-twin; pushrod OHV, 4 valves/cylinder
Bore x Stroke: 100mm x 118mm
Compression Ratio: 9.48:1
Fuel Delivery: Twin-Bore electronic fuel injection; throttle position sensor
Ignition: TCI: Transistor Controlled Ignition
Transmission: 5-speed; multiplate wet clutch
Final Drive: Belt

Chassis and Dimensions

Star Roadliner

Frame: Aluminum monoshock
Suspension/Front: 46mm telescopic fork; adjustable preload, 5.1-in travel
Suspension/Rear: Single shock; 4.3-in travel
Brakes/Front: Dual hydraulic disc, 298mm
Brakes/Rear: Hydraulic disc, 320mm
Tires/Front: 130/70-18
Tires/Rear: 190/60-17
Wheels: 12-spoke cast
Length: 101.6 in
Width: 43.3 in
Height: 43.3 in
Seat Height: 27.8 in
Wheelbase: 67.5 in
Ground Clearance: 6.1 in
Fuel Capacity: 4.5 gal
Fuel Economy: 42 mpg
Wet Weight: 749 lb

Other

Warranty: 1 Year (Limited Factory Warranty)

Features & Benefits

Star Roadliner

Key Features:

  • The Roadliner S gets chrome switchgear, front brake and clutch master cylinders and levers, belt guard, fork and fork covers, handlebar clamps, shifter, front pulley cover, various engine covers, rear fender stay and polished wheels.
  • The flagship of the Star line, and Cycle World magazine’s Best Cruiser for 2006 (CW’s 10 Best, July `06) is designed to show and go like no other cruiser before it, with big power and great handling.
  • Powerful and beautiful 113-cubic-inch (1854cc) air-cooled, pushrod V-twin produces great thrust at any speed.
  • Twin-bore downdraft electronic fuel injection ensures optimum engine efficiency and throttle response in the widest possible range of conditions.
  • Neo-streamline design, gives the Roadliner S a completely distinctive look.
  • Long and low aluminum frame provides great looks and light handling unlike any other full-size cruiser, thanks to a low center of gravity feel and a near 50/50 weight distribution on the front and rear wheels.
  • A sculpted seat makes the Roadliner S an excellent place to sit on long rides.
  • The Roadliner S achieves fuel economy up to an estimated 42 mpg** with a fuel tank that holds 4.5 gallons of gas.

  • Engine:

  • 113-cubic-inch (1854cc) air-cooled pushrod 48-degree V-twin has massive looks and performance.
  • Four pushrod-activated valves and two spark plugs per cylinder provide optimum combustion efficiency along with classically beautiful engine architecture.
  • Plated cylinders and forged pistons cooled by oil jets provide outstanding reliability and long life. Twin counterbalancers keep things smooth but rumbly.
  • 9.48:1 compression ratio and aggressive cam timing increase power output across the board.
  • Computer-controlled, twin-bore, fuel-injection monitors multiple engine parameters to calculate perfect mixture under all conditions; a wide-angle 12-hole fuel injectors provide excellent atomization.
  • Exhaust Ultimate Power valve (EXUP) inside the two-into-one exhaust system boosts torque in the 2500-3000 rpm range.
  • Special custom machining of the cooling fin edges gives a jewel-like appearance to the engine as light hits it from different angles.
  • 3300 rpm at 75 mph gives some idea of the Roadliner’s power and cruisability. Maximum torque is reached at only 2500 rpm.

  • Chassis/Suspension:

  • Aluminum frame is light, rigid, and requires few welds. A light, Controlled-Fill swingarm casting complements the bike’s streamline style.
  • With 49.6 percent of its weight carried on the front wheel, the Roadliner S has the weight distribution of a sportbike instead of the typical cruiser, and that means great handling.
  • 46mm fork tubes wearing slant-cut stainless covers serve up an excellent ride and a sweet appearance.
  • A tucked-out-of-sight single shock with adjustable spring preload out back provides a smooth ride under varying loads.
  • A thick, richly chromed 1.25-inch handlebar in polished clamps carries the Roadliner’s switchgear wiring on the inside.
  • Flangeless, teardrop fuel tank carries a full 4.5 gallons of fuel.
  • 12-spoke wheels evoke a thick spoke look, but carry modern tubeless radial tires; a 130/70-18 front and a fat 190/60-17 rear.
  • Front brake master cylinder with integrated lever operates a pair of 298mm front discs squeezed by strong monoblock calipers for excellent power and feel.
  • Strong and light belt final drive routes power smoothly and efficiently to the rear wheel.
  • Floating floorboards and an adjustable heel/toe shifter help provide a comfortable, low-effort ride.

  • Additional Features:

  • A sculpted seat makes the Roadliner S an excellent place to sit on long rides.
  • Position beams within the main headlight housing provide great visibility.
  • Left-thumb operated high-beam switch, and right-thumb activated accessory driving light switch for great visibility.
  • Jewel-like fit and finish, and Star quality paint, chrome and attention to detail are evident all over the Roadliner S.
  • Classic clock-style instrumentation complements Roadliner S’s neo-retro look and contains analog speedometer, tachometer and fuel gauge, along with twin digital tripmeters, odometer and self-diagnostics.
  • Bright multi-reflector headlight, LED taillight and amber turn signals behind clear lenses give a custom look.
  • Oxygen sensor and three-way catalyst reduce emissions.

  • *Registration is required to post in this forum

    Back to top