> 

2010 Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring


Posted on by 2

If the 2010 Triumph Rocket III Roadster doesn’t lead the power cruiser class then I don’t know what does. Surprisingly easy to maneuver, great performing, and extremely good looking, the British largest capacity production motorcycle is here to stay and get even better, just as it does this year.

While cruisers such as the America and the Speedmaster were revamped this late years with a fuel injection system ensuring that Euro 3 regulations are met, the Rocket III models are found in the situation of saying “been there, done that” and continue getting more power out of the monstrously big inline-triple, while the whole machine is now claimed to be a much better performer. We’ll see about that after the jump.

 

Introduction

Back in the early days it was all about a massive and rumbling V-twin mounted on a rigid chassis. If you wanted to take the bike down the highway, you would simply fit it with a windscreen. The idea was to keep the bike weighing as low as possible, sometimes even contradicting the manufacturer’s vision related to certain features. “What about the front brakes? Who needs those, anyway?” You could hear that on a daily basis.

With the years passing by, manufacturers tried to keep the rhythm imposed by the rebel customers so we witnessed motorcycles displacing more and more cubic inches. That happened until the Triumph Rocket III saw the production line. American builders formed a new idea on massive cruisers and it seems that some thinks simply never change as the Rocket III is still the best performance cruiser ever to see the streets.

146-bhp fuel injected inline-triple engine

What’s best, the 2010 Triumph lineup includes what the Hinckley-based company calls “the ultimate muscle streetfighter”, the Rocket III Roadster. Considering the original bike’s reputation of being the meanest cruiser out there and the new model’s even greater references, we have to admit that the fact that it gets even more power and torque as well as ABS doesn’t come as a surprise although it should. What we’re talking about here is a 15% torque increase to 163 lb/ft of torque at just 2,750rpm, an impressive 146bhp at 5,750rpm and a very low (for the class) wet weight of 807lbs (367kg).

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring


Speaking about class, calling the 2010 Triumph Rocket III Roadster a cruiser simply won’t do it justice so Triumph starts referring about this bike as being a streetfighter. And the rearranged riding position as a result of the new ergonomics (note the mid-mount foot controls) shows how Triumph isn’t that far from the truth when saying that this hot rod will provide "a completely different riding experience from its predecessor." Also, the 43mm upside down Kayaba forks with 120mm of travel, Kayaba twin shocks with 105mm of travel stand by that affirmation and will carry on the Rocket’s corner carver reputation. This also requires a more than decent braking system and the ABS upgrade comes in handy for the 320mm front discs with Nissin 4-pots up front and a 316mm disc with a 2-pot Brembo at the rear.

The 2294cc inline, liquid-cooled triple engine gets new twin cans, which are claimed to be better able to sustain an angry conversation with the enthusiastic Triumph Rocket III Roadster rider. Still, this new model stands out mostly thanks to its two black color schemes: metallic Phantom Black and Matt Black.

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring


For 2010 Triumph carries on producing the Touring version. This performs as good as the previous two versions while the touring changes consist in modified suspensions, low seat, shaft final drive, and as distinctive features you get the windshield, floorboards and the 36 liter panniers. The engine on the Rocket III Touring is detuned to 105bhp at 6,000 rpm and 150 ft lbs at 2,500 rpm.

History

First launched at the end of 2004 as a 2005 model year, the Triumph Rocket III wrote a big page of history with the help of its 2300cc three-cylinder motor featuring 101.6mm pistons. The 240mm rear tire was also a first and received appreciation from motorcyclists all over the world. The Rocket III was a great success as riders rushed to buy the cruiser with a sportbike heart.

But what not many people know is that Triumph had long developed the Rocket III. It all started with an idea back in 1999 when new models were sketched and which had the luck to be turned into reality earlier. Frankly, they based on Triumph’s heritage, totally apart from the new bike that thrilled everyone even from the drawing board.

Competition

It is obvious that with the Rocket III Triumph decided to clearly position themselves as leaders of the class, but American and Japanese manufacturers had also developed power cruisers that seem in a class of their own.

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

The Harley-Davidson Night Rod is an aggressive speed machine that disposes of a liquid-cooled, 1250cc V-Twin that backs its looks up with 125hp. Prettier, sharper-looking, and with its mysterious attitude given by the Matte Black color and new, black, five-spoke cast aluminum wheels, the Night Rod is more appealing while remaining strong-pulling and maneuverable. This is one great alternative in case you don’t feel like going for the biggest and most powerful.

Star VMAX

But if it is to find the most threatening competitor for the new Trumpet, this would definitely have to be the Yamaha Yamaha V-MAX. With a long history record, unbelievable performance figures – 200hp at 9,000 rpm, 166.8 Nm at 6,500 rpm – and looks to match, the V-MAX addresses to the same rider pattern and it is not welcoming the Roadster to its market share, so we’ll have to see sales charts and comparison tests to know how things turn out between the too models.


Exterior

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

If there’s something that not everybody appreciates at the Rocket III, then we’re talking about the way this bike looks. I mean, would you call it beautiful? Not sure! It is imposing, yes, aggressive, of course, and unique-looking, without a doubt, but not beautiful. I am not an adept of the idea that Triumph intended to make it look sexy. No, I think and very much hope it tried to deliver a massive-looking bike that would take you to gas pumps 200 miles apart one from the other.

In order to do that, it needed a huge 6.3 gallons fuel tank which raises a bit high to make room for the tank-like radiator. The seat looks like a sofa and the exhaust like rocket launchers. Wheels and fenders also enhance the massive appearance, just like the exhaust system which features kind of an unusual arrangement so that it would unveil the three cylinders. Exhaust pipes are found on each side for a symmetric look.

Still, we kind of like where Triumph is heading their Rocket III Roadster towards and the Phantom Black, Matte Black colors available make this a serious looking ride. Furthermore, the Roadster comes with a multitude of blacked out components such as the forks, yokes and rear springs just to mention a few.

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring


On the Touring model you get a classic headlight and chrome all over instead of black. The color schemes available for the 2010 model are: Jet Black, Eclipse Blue/Azure Blue, Jet Black/New England White.

Press Reviews

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

"The initial heaviness gives way to a smooth and comfortable ride once the bike is on the move. The riding position is very good and allows you to control the heavy machine with ease. The seat is relatively close to the handlebars and is remarkably comfortable." – motociclismo

"The huge 2,294cc 3-cylinder engine delivers smooth drive from anywhere in the rev range and amazingly for a bike of these dimensions it actually handles pretty well, although don’t expect to be able to hustle through too many corners, as the Roadster’s ground clearance is pretty limited due to it being a cruiser/musclebike." – visordown

"Responsive throttle action in all gears makes overtakes, town riding and country blats a delight. With an extra 6bhp and 16ftlb of torque, care of a new exhaust system, every up shift of the 5-speed box gets the Roadster rushing forward from serious thrust." – MCN

"Stability on my ride was absolutely fine, which was no surprise given the strong frame (which uses the motor as a stressed member), conservative steering geometry and lorry-like wheelbase. I was again impressed by how well the big bike handled, helped by that wide handlebar to get it turning, and by suspension..." – motorcyclistonline

"The old Rocket’s amazing ease of use is still there - the behemoth has awesome slow speed manners. And when you start to go a bit faster, things go much better than you’d expect. The Rocket handles amazingly well, once you suspend your disbelief at such a preposterous, 367kg wet piece of nonsense swinging its way round bends." – superbike

Price

It is always Triumph’s best decision to keep the price as low as possible and their biggest motorcycle couldn’t have featured a special price, although I don’t think riders would have let themselves scared so easily. The MSRP for the 2010 Triumph Rocket III Touring starts at $16,999 (Single Color) and $17, 299 (Two-tone Color), while the Roadster model’s price is to be announced. 

Conclusion

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

Although it doesn’t make quite a statement when it comes to the way it looks, the Triumph Rocket III is an excellent performing, and very comfortable motorcycle. Riders will enjoy its aggressive character all the way through the powerband while the way this bike handles makes everyone brag about it.

 


SPECIFICATIONS (Roadster model)

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

 

Engine and Transmission

 

  • Type: Liquid-cooled, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder
  • Capacity: 2294cc
  • Bore/Stroke: 101.6 x 94.3mm
  • Compression Ratio: 8.7:1
  • Fuel System: Multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection with twin butterflies and progressive linkage on primary butterflies
  • Final Drive: Shaft
  • Clutch: Wet, multi-plate
  • Gearbox: 5-speed constant mesh

 

Performance (measured at crankshaft to 95/1/EC)

 

  • Maximum Power EC: 146bhp @ 5,750 rpm
  • Maximum Torque EC: 163 ft.lbs @ 2,750 rpm

 

Chassis and Dimensions

 

  • Frame: Tubular steel, twin spine
  • Swingarm: Twin-sided, steel (houses drive shaft)
  • Front Wheel: Cast aluminum alloy 5-spoke, 17 x 3.5in
  • Rear Wheel: Cast aluminum alloy 5-spoke, 16 x 7.5in
  • Front Tyre: 150/80 R17
  • Rear Tyre: 240/50 R 16
  • Front Suspension: Kayaba 43mm upside down forks, 120mm travel
  • Rear Suspension: Kayaba black spring twin shocks with 5 position adjustable preload, 105mm wheel travel
  • Front Brakes: Twin 320mm floating discs, Nissin 4-piston fixed calipers, Nissin ABS system
  • Rear Brakes: Single 316mm fixed disc, Brembo 2-piston floating caliper, Nissin ABS system
  • Length: 98.3 in
  • Width (Handlebars): 38.2 in
  • Height: 45.8 in
  • Seat Height: 29.5 in
  • Wheelbase: 66.7 in
  • Rake/Trail: 32 degree / 148 mm
  • Wet weight: 807 lbs
  • Fuel Tank Capacity: 6.3 gals

 

 

Features & Benefits (Roadster model)

 

Engine

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

 

  • The Rocket III Roadster features the most powerful version yet of the incomparable 2.3 liter, in-line, water cooled, triple. With 146bhp at 5,750rpm, the Rocket III Roadster is the most powerful model in Triumph’s range – but it’s the massive torque that really separates the Rocket III Roadster from the rest. With 163 ft.lbs, more than any other motorcycle on the market, the Rocket III Roadster accelerates unlike nothing else. But despite its size, the engine is incredibly smooth as the balance, input and rear drive shaft contra-rotate against the crankshaft, which makes for minimal torque reaction.

 

Brakes

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

 

  • The Rocket III Roadster features a sophisticated anti-lock braking system that makes 100 calculations each second to ensure the rider retains full control under extreme braking. Up front, the twin four-piston calipers are mated to 320mm floating discs to deliver the sort of stopping power you’d expect from a high-performance bike. The rear brake, developed especially by Brembo, is a single twin piston caliper and 316mm disc.

 

Suspension

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

 

  • Menacingly blacked out 43mm upside down forks offer precise steering while all-new twin shock absorbers at the rear provide a comfortable and composed ride one-up or two. Combined with the mid-mounted controls and revised ergonomics, the Rocket III Roadster offers the sportiest ride of any motorcycle to proudly display the Rocket III badge.

 

Black Finishes

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

 

  • Two menacing black finishes make the Roadster the meanest looking Rocket III yet. The motorcycle is available in sparkling Phantom Black or a minimalist Matte Black option, with the stripped down, ready for action look enhanced with some equally shadowy components. From the Roadster’s 2.3 liter heart to the 43mm forks up front, the blacked-out components of the Rocket III Roadster emit classic streetfighter aggression.

 

Chassis

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

 

  • In sparkling Phantom Black or menacing Matte, the Rocket III Roadster emits menace and quality in equal dozes. The chassis is a tubular steel twin-spine design using the engine as a stressed member for maximum stiffness and control. New ergonomics place the rider in an ideal position to push the bike effortlessly into corners, while the blacked-out components perfectly match the aggressive streetfighter styling and ensure the Roadster looks as good as it rides.

 

 

SPECIFICATIONS (Touring model)

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

 

Engine and Transmission

 

  • Type: Liquid-cooled, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder
  • Capacity: 2294cc
  • Bore/Stroke: 101.6 x 94.3mm
  • Compression Ratio: 8.7:1
  • Fuel System: Multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection with twin butterflies and progressive linkage on primary butterflies
  • Final Drive: Shaft
  • Clutch: Wet, multi-plate
  • Gearbox: 5-speed constant mesh

 

Performance (measured at crankshaft to 95/1/EC)

 

  • Maximum Power EC: 105bhp @ 6,000 rpm
  • Maximun Torque EC: 150 ft.lbs @ 2,500 rpm

 

Chassis and Dimensions

 

  • Frame: Tubular steel, twin spine
  • Swingarm: Twin-sided, steel (houses drive shaft)
  • Front Wheel: Cast aluminum alloy 25-spoke 16 x 3.5in
  • Rear Wheel: Cast aluminum alloy 25-spoke 16 x 5.0in
  • Front Tyre: 150/80 R16
  • Rear Tyre: 180/70 R16
  • Front Suspension: Kayaba 43mm forks with fully shrouded uppers, 120mm travel
  • Rear Suspension: Kayaba chromed spring twin shocks with 5 position adjustable preload, 105mm wheel travel
  • Front Brakes: Twin 320mm floating discs, Nissin 4-piston fixed calipers
  • Rear Brakes: Single 316mm fixed disc, Brembo 2-piston floating caliper
  • Length: 102.4 in
  • Width (Handlebars): 39.1 in including levers (widest fixed part)
  • Height: 46.5 in (excluded quick release screen & mirrors)
  • Seat Height: 28.7 in
  • Wheelbase: 67.1 in
  • Rake/Trail: 32 degree / 184 mm
  • Wet weight: 869 lbs
  • Fuel Tank Capacity: 5.9 US gals

 

 

Features & Benefits (Touring model)

 

Engine

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

 

  • The Rocket III Touring shares the same engine platform as the Rocket III. Its increased torque at low speeds means that even two-up and fully laden it will accelerate effortlessly for easy passing. The engine management system uses sensors to determine the correct fueling and ignition and tailors the torque curve for each gear ratio. As a result the Rocket III Touring responds quickly, cleanly and strongly at any speed, in any gear.

 

Seat

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

 

  • The seat has the generous proportion of being 18” wide. The three layer construction with taped seams ensures that water is kept out!

 

Hard Bags

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

 

  • The color-matched, hard bags come as standard and are lockable using the ignition key. They are quick to detach via two quarter-turn fasteners. They have been designed to be free-standing, are fully sealed and water resistant.

 

Footboards

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

 

  • Teardrop shaped, chromed aluminum castings with removable wear plates, spring mounted with an anti-rattle pivot and rubber down stops.

 

Screen

Triumph Rocket III Roadster / Touring

 

  • A quick release screen comes as standard with great care paid to the details: The polished stainless steel mechanism and unique spring-loaded mounting bobbins lock the screen solidly in place, while lower air deflectors work with the main ‘blade’ of the screen to deflect turbulence.


2 comments:

At a little over half the price of a Honda Rune, the Rocket3 wins me over hands down.

compare to my honda rune the rocket 3 is to high to and is steering is not acceptable to run on the road really curve and they dont have the thecnology of the rune for shure .. i have try a rocket 3 2 years a go and they dont impression me .... but the motor is really strong ...sorry is not the best cruiser

*Registration is required to post in this forum

Back to top