> 
 > 

2010 Triumph Speed Triple


Posted on by

Triumph is aware of the fact that it just isn’t enough to be part of the world’s motorcycle history so they reinvent themselves creating and then carrying on manufacturing unique motorcycles such as the Speed Triple. If some of those models end up determining the creation of other ones, which is definitely the case here (just check out the Street Triple ), it means there’s great demand in that sector and it is also very likely for that first bike to stick around for more action. The 2010 Triumph Speed Triple does so and with not many changes to set it apart from the previous model year. So let’s see what Triumph is betting it will sell their bike.

 

Introduction

A good thing to start with is the bike’s distinctively tuned and sounding three cylinder engine. This purrs quietly in between the aluminum frame’s tubular bars, but the magic throttle twist determines the unleashing of immense amounts of low-end torque, a great rush all through the mid-range as well as a healthy top end.

128-bhp fuel injected inline-triple engine

Being used to impressively well balanced four-cylinder engines, we had serious concerns regarding the smooth operating capabilities and levels of vibrations transmitted to key elements such as the handlebars and footpegs, but as soon as we heard that 1050cc engine whistling we knew there’s nothing wrong about it.

Triumph Speed Triple


Because the engine proved being a great performer both on the track and on public roads, the British motorcycle manufacturer sticks to the 128bhp at 9,250rpm and especially to the 76ft.lbf delivered at 7,550rpm. No doubt about it, much to do with the impressive performance figures has the multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection system while the Keihin ECU ensures quick starting at all engine temperatures as well as good mileage.

Street Triple’s bigger sibling has a beautifully crafted frame that was also built with performance in mind, but most riders find the fully adjustable 43mm upside down forks and rear monoshock the sweetest features of the great all around chassis. You simply can’t go without performance brakes on this thing and we believe that the twin Brembo radial front caliper four pad, four piston units, with a radial master cylinder does the job of offering highly effective stopping power. This makes the Speed Triple a great machine to perform stoppies on despite the 477 lbs wet weight.

Overall, the bike is very compact and built around the rider, just like a supersports model, the only distinguishing factor being the bold streetfighter look which simply couldn’t get any better than it actually is.

Triumph Speed Triple


Triumph’s 2010 model range also features a limited edition Speed Triple model celebrating 15 years since the Hinckley-based company introduced the “streetfighter” style with the original Speed Triple back in the mid 1990s. While the limited edition bike is technically unchanged from its standard sibling, it sure stands out when it comes to mean looks and refined engineering.

History

Competition

Triumph Speed Triple

Triumph made no concessions in what concerns their Speed Triple, so it is recommended to go and search a proper four-cylinder alternative for it and not just comply with the BMW R1200R or the big Ducati Monster. Does the Yamaha Yamaha FZ1 / ABS sound like the appropriate thing? We’re sure it does and not only because the naked FZ1’s design has evolved a lot in these past few years, but mostly because of the fuel-injected 998cc, liquid-cooled, four-stroke, forward-inclined parallel four-cylinder DOHC engine delivering similar performances; 150hp (measured at crank) at 11,000 rpm and 106 Nm at 8,000 rpm. This engine is tuned to perform in the same way as the Triumph and that extra piston sure makes a difference despite the fairly smaller displacement.

1000cc Japanese urban sports are rare bread nowadays, so the FZ1 is pretty much the alternative to British style and performance.

Exterior

Triumph Speed Triple

As much as Triumph would increase the displacement of their engines and refine them in order to match the performance of bikes such as the FZ1, style is the chapter they’re leading and we can only anticipate things will be like this for a very long time. A good argument to back up the previous affirmation is the fact that Triumph has the talent of touching a rider’s sensible spot from the very first glance.

So while the Japanese aim towards Italian standards in what concerns their supersports models design, most of their nakeds have ended up featuring the distinctive bodywork features of the British Speed Triple, their first naked urban sports model and a benchmark for the industry.

The bike is characterized by the two streetfighter headlights and the above positioned instrumentation. Now, this is a part that the Japanese would have contoured very well, but they’d be wrong as the Speed Triple looks one-of-a-kind just like this. The gas tank is positioned within the limits of the tubular aluminum frame and the rear end is mostly composed by the 32.7 inches high seat that was nicely shaped to look like an actual part of the bodywork while offering good comfort.

Triumph Speed Triple


A nice and most likely difficult to achieve feature is the three-into-two underseat exhaust and while we’re at the rear end, it’s impossible not to mention the stylish multi-spoke alloy wheel supported by the single-sided swingarm. The wheels, frame as well as engine and transmission are all covered in black, be it matte or shiny, and even the front forks and Magura tapered aluminum handlebars are black anodized.

The attention to detail and the overall refined look ensure that the Speed Triple looks impeccable no matter the color scheme elected. This can be Blazing Orange, Jet Black, Fusion White or Matte Black.

The 2010 Triumph Speed Triple Special Edition features Phantom Black metallic paint, hand-finished red pinstriped wheels and ‘15th Anniversary Special Edition’ decals on the flyscreen and tail.

Press Reviews

Triumph Speed Triple

"The supercharged triple still takes my breath away every time I wind open the throttle. Because of the sheer grunt and torque on tap it feels like someone has squeezed a tuned Suzuki GSX-R1000 motor into the Triumph’s chassis." – MCN

"Mix the Triple motor with the straightforward handling and the S3 is a bike that is very easy to ride very fast. This is a good thing, most of the time, but makes it difficult to conform to the state of Tennessee’s stringent MPH limits." – motorcycle-usa

"Like all the liter-class triples from Triumph the Speed Triple is a real ripper; HP up top with a broad torque spread across the board. While I loved this motor in the Tiger Tiger I constantly felt like it was almost too much, day to day, in the Speed Triple; short wheelbase plus a strong, torquey motor can equal some harrowing moments if not treated with respect." - webbikeworld

"Plenty of smooth, linear power from the get-go, not to mention an intake and exhaust note found on no other bike. The Triumph handles nearly as well as the Tuono, has equally as good brakes, acts the hooligan like a true streetfighter, and does it all for $1,700 less than the Tuono." – motorcycle

"So, after waiting in anticipation for nearly five months to ride the Speed Triple, was it worth the wait? Oh yes. Despite its faults, I really want one. The mirrors are crap, the clocks useless and the radial brakes only as good as the current bike’s stoppers, but I loved the Speed Triple." – visordown

Price

Triumph may have not upgraded the 2010 Speed Triple, but the bike is worth the MSRP starting at $11,299 in most opinions of the bike’s admirers. We’re not shocked either.

Conclusion

Triumph Speed Triple

In the end, the Triumph Speed Triple, be it a 2009 or a 2010 model year is just a bike bringing enormous benefits to an inspired manufacturer which isn’t even needed to upgrade it in any way. Still, we’re hoping for a 2011 “R” model, just like the Street Triple 675 R .

SPECIFICATIONS

 

Engine and Transmission

 

  • Type: Liquid-cooled, 12 valve, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder
  • Capacity: 1050cc
  • Bore/Stroke: 79 x 71.4mm
  • Compression Ratio: 12.0:1
  • Fuel System: Multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection with SAI
  • Final Drive: X ring chain
  • Clutch: Wet, multi-plate
  • Gearbox: 6-speed

 

Performance (measured at crankshaft to 95/1/EC)

 

  • Maximum Power EC: 128bhp @ 9250 rpm
  • Maximum Torque EC: 76ft.lbs @ 7550 rpm

 

Chassis and Dimensions

 

  • Frame: Aluminum beam twin spar
  • Swingarm: Single-sided, aluminum alloy with eccentric chain adjuster
  • Front Wheel: Cast aluminum alloy , multi spoke, 17 x 3.5in
  • Rear Wheel: Cast aluminum alloy, multi spoke, 17 x 5.5in
  • Front Tyre: 120/70 ZR 17
  • Rear Tyre: 180/55 ZR 17
  • Front Suspension: Showa 43mm upside down forks with dual rate springs and adjustable preload, rebound and compression damping, 120mm travel
  • Rear Suspension: Showa Monoshock with adjustable preload and rebound and compression damping, 134mm rear wheel travel
  • Front Brakes: Twin 320mm floating discs. Brembo 4 piston 4 pad radial calipers
  • Rear Brakes: Single 220mm disc, Nissin 2 piston sliding caliper
  • Length: 80.9in
  • Width (Handlebars): 30.6in
  • Height: 44.1in
  • Seat Height: 32.7in
  • Wheelbase: 56.1in
  • Rake/Trail: 23.5 degree/84mm
  • Wet Weight: 477lbs
  • Fuel Tank Capacity: 4.8 US gal

 

Features & Benefits

 

Engine

Triumph Speed Triple

 

  • The Speed Triple’s 1050cc, three cylinder engine, with its unmistakable character and sound, pumps out a great surge of bottom-end torque, massive mid-range punch and an impressive level of overall power. Peak power is 131bhp at 9,250rpm while peak torque of 77ft.lbs arrives at 7,550rpm. Triumph Triumph ’s Keihin ECU offers sophisticated mapping for quicker starting, cleaner running and fuel efficient engine.

 

Wheels

Triumph Speed Triple

 

  • Multi-spoke alloy wheels add to the Speed Triple’s streetfighter attitude.

 

Suspension

Triumph Speed Triple

 

  • The fully adjustable 43mm upside down forks and rear monoshock add superb levels of quality and control, while the new black anodized finish to the front forks amplifies the Speed Triple’s rebellious look.

 

Brakes

Triumph Speed Triple

 

  • High-spec, twin Brembo radial front caliper four pad, four piston units, with a radial master cylinder, supply outstanding braking performance. 

 

Rear End

Triumph Speed Triple

 

  • The Speed Triple’s rear-end has sharp, minimalist styling and features a new rear sub-frame, polished stainless steel heat shields and repositioned ball burnished aluminum passenger footrests to give the passenger more leg room. It also sports a clear-lens LED rear light.

 

Handlebars

Triumph Speed Triple

 

  • Magura tapered, anodized aluminum handlebars are a sharp addition to the Street Triple’s minimalist styling.


*Registration is required to post in this forum

Back to top