Triumph

Triumph motorcycles

  Triumph Motorcycles is an iconic British motorcycle manufacturer that started production in 1902. Triumph made its mark and gained recognition by winning races.

As if it wasn’t mouth-watering enough, Triumph’s popular Tiger 1050 has been given a sporty new look for 2012, packed with an improved specification, new colors and graphics, and the same powerhouse drivetrain that we’ve all come to appreciate.

A truly versatile motorcycle, the Triumph Tiger 1050 SE is a rare creature that’s versatile and adept on just about any road surface. There’s no question that its well-rounded nature has made it one of Triumph’s best-selling models in recent years and given it a huge following around the world.

Sit astride the Tiger 1050 and you will understand just why so many year-round riders choose them as their daily rides. The tall - 32.8" - riding position gives the rider a commanding view over the traffic, with the well-appointed saddle facilitating comfortable day-long riding. New for the 2012 model are high-specification black anodized tapered aluminum handlebars. These are over half an inch lower than the previous steel items to give a more sporting riding position. The standard Tiger Tiger 1050 SE comes in three different color options: Diablo Red, Crystal White, and a two-tone Matte Black/Matte Graphite combination. The higher specification Tiger 1050SE also benefits from Triumph’s ABS braking system, as well as the standard fitment of hand guards, centerstand and 43-liter saddlebags, optional extras on the standard Tiger 1050.

Then there’s the powertrain, a staggering 1,050cc triple engineering feat that has been a staple of Triumph over the years, capable of effortlessly delivering 113 brake horsepower and 72 lb/ft of torque at just 6,250 rpm.

For 2012, the Tiger 1050 features redesigned suspension internals and new damping characteristics front and rear, with a stiffer spring at the rear. The result is a more controlled ride, both solo and with a passenger, with reduced dive under braking, making for an all-around, versatile bike that’s ready to conquer the road.

Find out more about the Triumph Tiger 1050 SE after the jump.

In case you didn’t know, the Triumph Bonneville , considered the most iconic Triumph motorcycle of all time, was named after the Bonneville Salt Flats, the site where Triumph broke numerous land speed records in the 1950s. As a tribute to their achievements, Triumph introduced the Bonneville back in 1959 and since then, the model has been considered one of the most famous and most popular bikes on the planet.

Today, the Bonneville is alive and well and it combines the style and spirit of those famous bikes of the 1970s with modern engineering to create a classic British twin for the 21st century rider.

The 2012 Bonneville comes with a low 29.1" seat height that makes it accessible to motorcyclists of all ages and experience. Short fenders and stylish chrome megaphone exhausts are also part of the old-school look, as are the lightweight 17" cast alloy wheels that make the bike agile and easy to ride. For the Bonneville SE model, riders will get an added tachometer, chromed tank badge, and brushed alloy engine cases for added practicality and an even more classic look. As far as color options are concerned, the standard model features metallic paint with Phantom Black and Aurum Gold options. The Bonneville SE is available in Phantom Black or two dual-color alternatives: Intense Orange with Phantom Black or Pacific Blue with Fusion White.

Beneath the retro looks lies a very current and usable motorcycle that features an 865cc air-cooled, DOHC, parallel-twin, 360º firing interval engine that produces a healthy 67 brake horsepower and 50 lb/ft of torque, giving the modern-day Bonneville a peppy performance that is at home both in the city and on the open road.

Find out more about the Triumph Bonneville after the jump.

There once was a time when the Triumph Bonneville ruled the roads. Though those days have long passed, the tradition continues on with the newest member of the family, the 2012 Bonneville T100.

The design of the Bonneville T100 is as traditional and contemporary as it gets. With its wire wheels and traditionally coachlined two-tone paintwork, the Bonneville T100 looks like a bike that was transported straight from the 60’s with real detailing straight from the pipeline. The peashooter exhausts, the classic two-tone color options, and spoked steel wheels are all retro-styled. In particular are the two-tone color options, which have been touched of gold or silver coachlines and painted by hand just as they always have been. For the 2012 model, Triumph is offering three regular options: Cranberry Red with New England White and Graphite and Metallic Phantom Black are the two-tone options, while the popular single-color Jet Black option is also available and comes with matching black-finished engine cases.

Powering the Trumph Bonneville T100 is an 865cc parallel-twin engine that resembles the classic 650cc pushrod motors of its heyday, except that this modern-day maverick ride comes with a double overhead camshaft engine that’s fully up to date with modern fuel injection for clean running and modern levels of performance and reliability. Twist the throttle and that 67 brake horsepower engine delivers real world performance, with the 41mm front forks and traditional chromed rear shocks providing poised handling and a comfortable ride.

Find out more about the Triumph Bonneville T100 after the jump.

The irony of a British bike manufacturer naming one of their bikes "America" isn’t lost on us, but what isn’t ironic is the fact that the Triumph America is one bad-ass machine.

As the bike that offers the most accessible entry point into Triumph’s cruiser range, the America delivers an authentic cruising experience with a distinctive Triumph twist attached. In terms of its design, the America’s was styled as a classic laid-back cruiser, with the 16" front and 15" rear cast alloy wheels sporting high-walled tires to complement the deeply valanced front fender, pulled-back handlebars, and feet-forward controls for a traditional low and laid-back cruiser look. The seat height is 27.1" and, together with a weight of just 550 pounds, the America is a fun ride wherever and whenever. With neat touches such as the easily accessible sidestand and friendly ergonomics, it’s no wonder the America attracts such a wide variety of riders searching for a cool-looking yet fun and easy-to-ride motorcycle.

As far as power is concerned, the Triumph America is powered by an 865cc air-cooled DOHC parallel-twin engine with a 270º firing interval and producing an output of 60 brake horsepower at 6,800 rpm and a maximum torque of 53 lb/ft of torque at 3,300 rpm.

Find out more about the Triumph America after the jump.

There’s a reason why the Triumph Rocket III Roadster is considered the world’s largest mass-produced motorcycle. More than just its beyond reproach 2,294cc three-cylinder engine, the Rocket III Roadster is a machine that delivers a riding experience that’s virtually unmatched in any class.

The Rocket III Roadster takes on a streetfighter stance and delivers an attitude-laden ride that all motorcyclists should experience at least once in their motorcycle-riding exploits. The ergonomics alone ensure that the Roadster delivers a completely different riding experience from any other Rocket IIIs – one that is easier to hustle through the corners. The plush seating configuration allows both the rider and passenger to sit comfortably, whether for short-distance rides or long-haul escapades.

Up front, the Rocket III Roadster sports Triumph’s trademark twin headlights to make what already looks like an imposing motorcycle even more striking. The aggressive, stripped down look carefully balances the black and chrome detail while the comprehensive instrumentation – including fuel gauge, gear selection indicator and clock – creates an appearance that rocks in every sense of the word.

The Rocket III Roadster also comes with special color options. In addition to the popular metallic Phantom Black, it comes in two flamboyant color schemes: Phantom Red Haze and Phantom Blue Haze. These are hand-painted in Triumph’s Hinckley factory and contain high sparkle content which creates an impression of incredible depth in sunlight, transforming from near black to a vibrant red or blue.

And then there’s that powertrain. If it’s jaw-dropping enough that the Rocket III Roadster comes with such a whopping powertrain, the fact that it delivers 146 horsepower at 5,750 rpm and 163 lb/ft of torque at 2,750 rpm makes this Triumph monster a true bike that’s in a class all its own.

Find out more about the Triumph Rocket III Roadster after the jump.

The 2012 Triumph Scrambler harkens back to the days when stripped-down desert sleds of the 1960s were in vogue. Fast forward to today and you have an off-road traveler that likewise boasts of a modern road-based package.

The Scrambler takes its inspiration from those old Triumph ISDT machines that were once famously ridden by Steve McQueen with its classic styling dominated by twin high-level exhausts, designed to provide maximum ground clearance on rough terrain.

The design of the bike is pretty old school, only adding to its modern-day appeal. The utilitarian style is highlighted by the two simple single-color options, with a new Matte Black option joining the popular military-style Matte Khaki Green. Likewise, the spoked wheels with lightly knobbed tires, high footrests, rugged fork gaiters and wide, off-road style handlebars give a further nod to the Scrambler’s off-road heritage. Then there are items such as headlight grills, skid plate, and number boards, all of which adds even further resemblance to the ISDT models of the 60’s.

Powering the Scrambler is a unique version of Triumph’s 865cc parallel-twin engine. Designed outwardly to look like a classic 1960s twin, this DOHC eight-valve unit is a low-maintenance modern engine developed to meet the most stringent emissions regulations.

The fuel-injected twin delivers a laid-back output of 58 brake horsepower and 50 lb/ft of torque at just 4,750 rpm, making the Scrambler a versatile ride that can tackle a number of riding conditions. With its 270-degree crankshaft, the Scrambler takes on a totally different character to the other models in Triumph’s classic range, producing a totally addictive off-beat soundtrack which can be cranked up a notch and enjoyed just like those old mavens that used to run wild on the roads and highways of the world.

Find out more about the Triumph Scrambler after the jump.

There’s no doubt in anyone’s mind that the Triumph Thruxton is a true connoisseur’s bike, having been inspired by the Bonneville-based café racers of the 1960s and named after the Hampshire race track where the bike maker enjoyed so much success.

In terms of design, the Thruxton is about as classically designed as the word can get. The low slung handlebars exude an old-school attitude that belies its all-world, new-school performance. The central racing stripes are also a picture of design genius, as does the classic spoked, alloy-rimmed wheels and the overall cafe racer-inspired styling of the bike.

At the heart of the Thruxton is an 865cc eight-valve DOHC parallel-twin engine that has been tuned for peak performance, delivering an impressive 68bhp, thanks in large part to a revised camshaft profile and high-compression pistons. Make no mistake, motorcycles are designed to evoke emotions, and no motorcycle creates a bigger emotion than the Triumph Thruxton.

Then there’s its handling capabilities, to which the Thruxton holds a back seat to no one. 41mm forks and chromed twin shock absorbers adjustable for preload, all deliver a tailored, sporting ride to match the looks. A fully floating 320mm front disc brake equips the Thruxton with far more stopping power and assurance than the 1960s bikes it pays homage to.

All told, you won’t find a more evocative, retro-styled bike than the Triumph Thuxton.

Find out more about the Triumph Thruxton after the jump.

When it comes about updating bikes, Triumph ’s models are maybe the best ones to be tuned. One of the main reasons you have seen tons of them lately, and reason why we bring you another one today: a 2007 Triumph Bonneville built by the Spanish shop Café Racer Dreams.

Their package is called "Night Track" and includes a A K&N air filter, Keihin carbs, a handmade two-into-one exhaust system terminated with a Supertrapp muffler. The package continues with a mini headlight that sits in front of Renthal Ultra Low bars fitted with enduro-style switchgear. The footpegs are custom, and the shocks from Hagon.

You may think that the bike’s look might feature a minimalist style, but if you add that very cool matte black paint then you definitely the coolest Bonneville ever. Too bad the tuner decided not to improve the bike’s performance numbers in any way, but we still like their work very much.

Source: Bikeexif

Very often are we floored by a custom bike that takes the original model and turns it into something that’s better than what we expected. Yet that’s what 27-year-old Benjamin Blanchard was able to accomplish.

The French graphic designer took a Triumph Speed Triple bike and injected some straight up attitude into it. Already sporting a powerful 1,050cc DOHC three-cylinder, fuel injected engine, Blanchard went out of his way to re-model the bike to his liking. Carbon fiber was used on the bodywork of the bike, with incredible detail put on a lot of its parts.

The prevalent use of carbon fiber on the bike drastically reduced its weight, making it lighter and faster than any of the standard Speed Triple’s out there. The light weight of the bike, combined with its powerful engine, has turned an already impressive Speed Triple into the Impoz Speed Racer.

It takes a really impressive presence to catch our attention. Benjamin Blanchard managed to achieve that - and more.

Source: Bikeexif

The Triumph Speedmaster enters the 2011 model year featuring a new 19" cast aluminum front wheel with single disc brake and ‘skinny’ tire, a few updated design elements, and improved ergonomics. The 865cc parallel twin engine delivers 61 HP and 72Nm of torque.

You will easily notice blacked out engine cases, a carefully crafted teardrop tank, minimalist mudguards, a 15" cast rear wheel with high profile tire and a new front headlight design.

The 2011 Speedmaster will be available in two color options: classic metallic Phantom Black and Cranberry Red. The saddlebags, screens and alternative seats can be customized depending customer’s preference.

A new low 690mm seat height next to new and wider handlebars that deliver a new riding position that feels substantially different to the previous model and which will appeal to a wide variety of riders. Prices will be announced at a later date.

Press release after the jump.


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