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Triumph

Triumph motorcycles

  Triumph Motorcycles is an iconic British motorcycle manufacturer that started production in 1902. Triumph made its mark and gained recognition by winning races.


There’s a reason why the Triumph Rocket III Roadster is considered the world’s largest mass-produced motorcycle. More than just its beyond reproach 2,294cc three-cylinder engine, the Rocket III Roadster is a machine that delivers a riding experience that’s virtually unmatched in any class.

The Rocket III Roadster takes on a streetfighter stance and delivers an attitude-laden ride that all motorcyclists should experience at least once in their motorcycle-riding exploits. The ergonomics alone ensure that the Roadster delivers a completely different riding experience from any other Rocket IIIs – one that is easier to hustle through the corners. The plush seating configuration allows both the rider and passenger to sit comfortably, whether for short-distance rides or long-haul escapades.

Up front, the Rocket III Roadster sports Triumph’s trademark twin headlights to make what already looks like an imposing motorcycle even more striking. The aggressive, stripped down look carefully balances the black and chrome detail while the comprehensive instrumentation – including fuel gauge, gear selection indicator and clock – creates an appearance that rocks in every sense of the word.

The Rocket III Roadster also comes with special color options. In addition to the popular metallic Phantom Black, it comes in two flamboyant color schemes: Phantom Red Haze and Phantom Blue Haze. These are hand-painted in Triumph’s Hinckley factory and contain high sparkle content which creates an impression of incredible depth in sunlight, transforming from near black to a vibrant red or blue.

And then there’s that powertrain. If it’s jaw-dropping enough that the Rocket III Roadster comes with such a whopping powertrain, the fact that it delivers 146 horsepower at 5,750 rpm and 163 lb/ft of torque at 2,750 rpm makes this Triumph monster a true bike that’s in a class all its own.

Find out more about the Triumph Rocket III Roadster after the jump.


The 2012 Triumph Scrambler harkens back to the days when stripped-down desert sleds of the 1960s were in vogue. Fast forward to today and you have an off-road traveler that likewise boasts of a modern road-based package.

The Scrambler takes its inspiration from those old Triumph ISDT machines that were once famously ridden by Steve McQueen with its classic styling dominated by twin high-level exhausts, designed to provide maximum ground clearance on rough terrain.

The design of the bike is pretty old school, only adding to its modern-day appeal. The utilitarian style is highlighted by the two simple single-color options, with a new Matte Black option joining the popular military-style Matte Khaki Green. Likewise, the spoked wheels with lightly knobbed tires, high footrests, rugged fork gaiters and wide, off-road style handlebars give a further nod to the Scrambler’s off-road heritage. Then there are items such as headlight grills, skid plate, and number boards, all of which adds even further resemblance to the ISDT models of the 60’s.

Powering the Scrambler is a unique version of Triumph’s 865cc parallel-twin engine. Designed outwardly to look like a classic 1960s twin, this DOHC eight-valve unit is a low-maintenance modern engine developed to meet the most stringent emissions regulations.

The fuel-injected twin delivers a laid-back output of 58 brake horsepower and 50 lb/ft of torque at just 4,750 rpm, making the Scrambler a versatile ride that can tackle a number of riding conditions. With its 270-degree crankshaft, the Scrambler takes on a totally different character to the other models in Triumph’s classic range, producing a totally addictive off-beat soundtrack which can be cranked up a notch and enjoyed just like those old mavens that used to run wild on the roads and highways of the world.

Find out more about the Triumph Scrambler after the jump.


There’s no doubt in anyone’s mind that the Triumph Thruxton is a true connoisseur’s bike, having been inspired by the Bonneville-based café racers of the 1960s and named after the Hampshire race track where the bike maker enjoyed so much success.

In terms of design, the Thruxton is about as classically designed as the word can get. The low slung handlebars exude an old-school attitude that belies its all-world, new-school performance. The central racing stripes are also a picture of design genius, as does the classic spoked, alloy-rimmed wheels and the overall cafe racer-inspired styling of the bike.

At the heart of the Thruxton is an 865cc eight-valve DOHC parallel-twin engine that has been tuned for peak performance, delivering an impressive 68bhp, thanks in large part to a revised camshaft profile and high-compression pistons. Make no mistake, motorcycles are designed to evoke emotions, and no motorcycle creates a bigger emotion than the Triumph Thruxton.

Then there’s its handling capabilities, to which the Thruxton holds a back seat to no one. 41mm forks and chromed twin shock absorbers adjustable for preload, all deliver a tailored, sporting ride to match the looks. A fully floating 320mm front disc brake equips the Thruxton with far more stopping power and assurance than the 1960s bikes it pays homage to.

All told, you won’t find a more evocative, retro-styled bike than the Triumph Thuxton.

Find out more about the Triumph Thruxton after the jump.

When it comes about updating bikes, Triumph ’s models are maybe the best ones to be tuned. One of the main reasons you have seen tons of them lately, and reason why we bring you another one today: a 2007 Triumph Bonneville built by the Spanish shop Café Racer Dreams.

Their package is called "Night Track" and includes a A K&N air filter, Keihin carbs, a handmade two-into-one exhaust system terminated with a Supertrapp muffler. The package continues with a mini headlight that sits in front of Renthal Ultra Low bars fitted with enduro-style switchgear. The footpegs are custom, and the shocks from Hagon.

You may think that the bike’s look might feature a minimalist style, but if you add that very cool matte black paint then you definitely the coolest Bonneville ever. Too bad the tuner decided not to improve the bike’s performance numbers in any way, but we still like their work very much.

Source: Bikeexif

Very often are we floored by a custom bike that takes the original model and turns it into something that’s better than what we expected. Yet that’s what 27-year-old Benjamin Blanchard was able to accomplish.

The French graphic designer took a Triumph Speed Triple bike and injected some straight up attitude into it. Already sporting a powerful 1,050cc DOHC three-cylinder, fuel injected engine, Blanchard went out of his way to re-model the bike to his liking. Carbon fiber was used on the bodywork of the bike, with incredible detail put on a lot of its parts.

The prevalent use of carbon fiber on the bike drastically reduced its weight, making it lighter and faster than any of the standard Speed Triple’s out there. The light weight of the bike, combined with its powerful engine, has turned an already impressive Speed Triple into the Impoz Speed Racer.

It takes a really impressive presence to catch our attention. Benjamin Blanchard managed to achieve that - and more.

Source: Bikeexif

The Triumph Speedmaster enters the 2011 model year featuring a new 19" cast aluminum front wheel with single disc brake and ‘skinny’ tire, a few updated design elements, and improved ergonomics. The 865cc parallel twin engine delivers 61 HP and 72Nm of torque.

You will easily notice blacked out engine cases, a carefully crafted teardrop tank, minimalist mudguards, a 15" cast rear wheel with high profile tire and a new front headlight design.

The 2011 Speedmaster will be available in two color options: classic metallic Phantom Black and Cranberry Red. The saddlebags, screens and alternative seats can be customized depending customer’s preference.

A new low 690mm seat height next to new and wider handlebars that deliver a new riding position that feels substantially different to the previous model and which will appeal to a wide variety of riders. Prices will be announced at a later date.

Press release after the jump.


Triumph’s Bonneville ruled the roads during the 1960s and no modern motorcycle replicates so closely the style and experience of those golden years than the modern day Bonneville T100. With its traditional wire wheels and coachlined two-tone paintwork, the Bonneville T100 looks like
it could have been built in 1969. But look closer and you will see a modern machine dripping with authentic touches only Triumph can deliver.

The bike is powered by a 865cc parallel twin-cylinder engine that delivers 66 HP at 7500rpm, with peak torque of 69Nm delivered at 5800rpm.

The 2011 T100 features peashooter silencers, classic two-tone color options and spoked steel wheels. The two-tone color options complement the traditional Bonneville styling and have the added touch of gold or silver coachlines, painted by hand just as they always have been. Three regular options are available: Phantom Black with Fusion White, Forest Green with New England White and the new Vintage Cream and Chocolate. The popular single color Jet Black option is also available and comes with matching black-finished engine cases. The popular single colour Jet Black option is also available and comes with matching black-finished engine cases.


Triumph brought at EICMA Show the 2011 Daytona 675 R. Starting with a standard Dayton 675, Triumph engineers worked in conjunction with Swedish suspension specialists Ohlins to create a machine that would really be appreciated on the circuit by expert riders.

Ohlins contributed its revolutionary 43 mm NIX30 forks usually only found on the racetrack and ultra-exotic Italian machines ans its MotoGT developed TTX36 rear suspension unit, while radially-mounted monoblock calipers and radial master cylinder from Italian specialist Brembo were specified to ensure Dayton 675R also has class-leading stopping power.

The Daytona 675R also gets: a standard lift quickshifter and a host of carbon fiber bodywork, including hugger, silencer heat shield ad front mudguard.

Mechanically the Daytona 675R is identical to the standard Daytona 675, delivering 125 HP at 12,600 rpm with a class-leading 72 NM of torque. The sports bike also get sporty new graphics that include a unique Triumph tank script and a special color scheme: Crystal White bodywork is contrasted with a race style black belly pan and distinctive red subframe.

Triuph has unveiled the first details on the 2011 Tiger 800, offered in both road and off-rod versions, last one called XC. The last one will be distinguished by specia tires, 21-inch front wheel and extended front mudguard. The standard version will be offered with 19-inch front wheel and non-tubed tires.

For 2011 Triumph will be powered by a stroked out version of the Triumph Daytona 675. The 800 cc engine will deliver a few lees horse power than in the Dayton model (where it delivers 124bhp and 53lb/ft). SO, with a total weight of 440lbs and a power of aprox. 110 HP, the Triumph 800 will be lighter and a little more powerful than the BMW F800GS.

The 2011 800 will also be offered with a steel tube frame, a beefier bash guard and an Arrow exhaust.

No words yet on how much the motorcycle will cost or when it will go on sale.

Updated 11/05/2010: The new Trimph Tiger 800 and 800XC made their world debut in Italy at the EICMA Show. The Tiger 800 offers outstanding accessibility and maneuverability with cast alloy wheels and, thanks to the adjustable seat that’s on both models, a seat height as low as 31.9 inches to make it an adventure bike for the masses. The taller Tiger 800XC, meanwhile, delivers true off-road capability thanks to its longer-travel suspension and 21” spoke front wheel. With its higher riding position, the Tiger 800XC provides a commanding view of the road ahead and absorbs even the worst road conditions.

Press release after the jump.

Triumph Motorcycles has announced two new "adventure models" will be launched by the end of the year. The company revealed no other details on the two models, but they did confirmed new details will be announced in the next months: engine (August 4), chassis (September 1) and clothing/accessories (October 6th).

The two models are expected to made their world debut in November at the Milan EICMA Bike Show. Stay tuned for more details!

Source: Triumph

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