Yamaha

Yamaha motorcycles

Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

This patent drawing indicates that Yamaha is planning to develop an inline-four intercooled and turbocharged diesel engine. Furthermore, various technological solutions have made the subject of the patent application filled by the company’s officials.

The intercooler will be located above the engine or concealed in the frame and a turbocharger will be mounted adjacent to the cylinder head, protecting the parts, ensuring a compact design, but, most of all, minimizing turbo lag.

What makes this news even greater is the fact that Yamaha plans to develop turbo-diesel powerplants even for entry-level sports bikes such as the FZ6 drawing that we’re looking at, while the R1 and R6 can only dream of a modern oil burner and the implicit better fuel consumption.

Before the MotoGP race at Mazda Raceways , and our lucky pre-grid visit . Yamaha gave us the opportunity to walk right in their secret garages (team Fiat and team Monster).

Located in the back of the garage, the storage area is packed with expensive supplies, all stored in travel cases that probably cost more than any street bikes. Tires are cooking on aluminum racks, and precious suspension bits are piled as if it was Christmas. In between the storage and the pit garage, a narrow engineering room offers just enough space to pack 5 or 6 engineers and their laptops. Behind all that you ’finally’ enter the dream garage, with only two bikes and not one bit of mess anywhere to be found. The floor is carpeted to the team colors and all tool boxes are shinning as if they were just getting out of the show room.

It certainly take more mess for anyone to change their oil than it takes those mechanics to change every single part on those bikes altogether. Simply amazing!

Also check out the Autoblog article made by our friend Drew Philips. He took some great shots during the same visit.

Posted on by Maxx Biker

MCN road tester Trevor Franklin rode the Ohlins two-wheel-drive Yamaha R1 at the Karlskoga track in Sweden and came to the conclusion that: "The 2WD system works brilliantly. There’s no reason why it shouldn’t be fitted to road-going motorcycles."

After the break, you can check out the technical details, see the 2WD system work with the bike on the stands and then on the track with MCN’s tester onboard.

2WD is yet to be used on a large scale in the motorcycle industry, but articles such as the one published in today’s MCN number might just make a difference.

Source: MCN
Posted on by Maxx Biker 6

By looking at this chick’s “equipment” and attitude, this appears to be the worst case scenario on a Honda CBR1000RR. But surprise! The biker babe takes off gently, allowing us to take a good look at her long heels.

Has the world gone nuts or what?

Source: motoblog
Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

Those who were wondering what more could there be changed at Yamaha motocross bikes in order to improve performance are most likely to receive their answer with a single look at this spy picture of the 2010 Yamaha YZ450F reverse-cylinder.

This Powerpoint rendering shows how the new construction method allows the bottom end of the engine to move forward in the chassis, improving weight distribution and enhancing handling. This way, the exhaust pipe has a straight path towards the silencer and doesn’t need to be taken in consideration when doing the math for the front wheel clearance and also the inlet tract can be simply redesigned to go straight from the fuel injector to the combustion chamber. It even makes us wonder why Yamaha didn’t consider this possibility for the YZ450F so far.

Yamaha is supposed to unveil the completely new dirt bike within the next months and we reckon that it will blow away the competition.

Source: MCN
Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

Because no Yamaha R1 fan is stranger to MotoGP, Yamaha Motor France offers, with the occasion of the Grand Prix of France (15-17 May), four limited edition replicas of the bikes raced by Valentino Rossi and Jorge Lorenzo.

Featuring nothing special apart from the racing paintjobs and a corresponsive free replica helmet, the bikes come with a price of 19,990 euros which translates into US$26,600.

Posted on by Maxx Biker

Motociclismo states that Yamaha is developing a new T-Max from their currently successfully selling 500 model, a 750cc version supposedly powered by a three-cylinder motor specially designed for the new maxi scooter.

If the picture accords to Yamaha’s idea of a future 750 scooter, we’re happy to help spread the good news and dare ask your opinion about it.


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