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parts accesories

parts accesories

Posted on by Maxx Biker 5

Aftermarket parts supplier Rizoma recently worked their magic on Triumph’s Street Triple R and the result is at least remarkable. The Street Triple R was already the flagship of Hinckley’s middleweight naked lineup, but the extras are truly welcomed.

As known, Rizoma’s strategy starts from the fact that it’s the little things that make a bike special, so they offer just that, meaning their own mirrors, indicator lights, grips, handlebar caps, handlebars, fluid tanks, fluid tank caps, brake/clutch levers, handlebar adapter, license plate support, engine guard, front wheel guard, rear wheel guard, crankcase guard, rear set control kit, rider/passenger pegs, engine oil filter cap, wheel hole cap, bike stand support and lower chain guard.

Although it is less likely that owners of one of the best middleweight inline-triple bikes out there will initially think there’s something missing on their machine, after a while they’ll start feeling the need to spice things up a little bit and there will be Rizoma to help them out. We’re starting to think that these kinds of aftermarket kits for motorcycles are just as well suited as new rims are for cars.

Source: motoblog
Posted on by Maxx Biker 4

It is hard to believe that someone can take the Ducati Desmosedici RR and make it better, but it happened. This is the NCR Milona 16, a lightened, upgraded and implicit faster Ducati Desmosedici RR. We wouldn’t have believed it if the thing wouldn’t have recently been unveiled at the World Ducati Week at Misano.

The Italian tuning specialist has fitted the 200bhp MotoGP replica with a multitude of carbon fiber main parts such as the all-new frame and swingarm, rims, fuel tank, half-fairing, rear subframe, tail unit and front mudguard. All these, together with the titanium and aircraft-grade aluminum, reduce the bike’s dry weight to 319lbs (an impressive 71lbs less than what Ducati achieved).

Using performance Ohlins suspension and Brembo brakes, NCR’s M16 turns into a much sweeter ride. Although it doesn’t go significantly over 200bhp, which is the standard bike’s horsepower figure, the retuned engine is aimed at delivering a whole different rush across the powerband.

Claimed to be ‘world’s most exclusive motorcycle’, the NCR M16 will be built to order only and we don’t dare to think about the six-figure price.

Source: MCN
Posted on by Maxx Biker 4

Turning a classic inline-four Japanese motorcycle into a modern custom doesn’t sound like the easiest task, but the results can be truly satisfying. Just take a look at this 1976 Kawasaki Z900 that Spanish custom builder La Perra Bikes recently finished.

At its base, the bike remains the same, so the low bars and black wire wheels, Ohlins inverted forks, Brembo radial brake calipers as well as the wavy Galfer brake rotors help bring it back through the living. Once there, the chopped exhaust should make sure everyone hears it roar.

All in all, this looks like a short way from classic to custom, but it is the black and gold combination that really makes a striking difference.

Source: MCN
Posted on by Maxx Biker

A simple look at this street tracker is enough for one to think this is a rather expensive project bike and, considering the work and dedication that went into it, there’s nothing wrong with thinking that. But the truth is that Ken Fontenot and the crew at Cycle Sports in Houston, Texas started from a 1975 XS650 rolling chassis that was rusting outside their shop for the past decade and a half. They’ve restored it and used other parts from around the shop to turn it into a fully-functional motorcycle worthy of the checker flag. In the end, the project took six months and under $1800 worth of parts to complete, so it is a winner from the start. Just click past the break for the official description.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 3

Turning the BMW S1000RR into an 8.49-second, 158.46mph quarter mile drag bike can sound like an immense task at first, but considering the German superbike’s incredible tuning potential and the ambition of Brock’s Performance, we are actually talking facts here.

This Beemer sends 203hp and 80lb/ft of torque to the rear wheel – a new stock bikes record – and we’re not forgetting anything when saying that the only changes made to this incredibly fast drag bike consist in external bolt-ons in the form of a full exhaust system and Dynojet ECU, BST carbon wheels, MacIntosh extended swingarm and lowered suspension.

The bike will compete in the AMA Dragbike Supersport class, but only after receiving nitrous injection. Hit the jump to see it in action.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 3

This eye-catching bobber is a personal project of Richard Dunn and it actually started from a 1975 Harley-Davidson Sportster. When he bought the bike, it had all of its original parts on (apart from a weld-on hardtail), so it was just a matter of restoring, reshaping or upgrading the different components that now turn it into a bobber.

Featuring 3-inch lower suspension supporting the original 7-spoke mag wheels as well as a new generation Sportster fuel tank and a custom oil tank, this bike turns from old school into modern. The bars, which are bolted on H-D risers, were supplied by Biltwell Keystone, while Front Street Cycle sent in the rear fender and Baas Metal Craft the thin seat. This last piece is actually described as being “wrapped with foam and some saddle cowhide with a tight stitch around the perimeter,” just so you’ll see the attention to details that this thing required.

Apart from the main parts mentioned above, Dunn’s blood, sweat and tears helped at making the old H-D Sportster look and perform like a one-of-a-kind bobber that is best represented by these gorgeous pictures.

Source: bikeexif
Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

The Z2/750RS was one of Kawasaki’s highly appreciated inline-four nakeds and made the subject of many customization projects over the years and, as we have recently come to find, it can still work its magic. Modified by the Kouga branch of the Sanctuary workshop, this precise exemplar apparently retains most of its original features, but it is brought up to date especially in what the chassis is concerned.

Now built around a powdercoated and reinforced frame and featuring Yamaha XJR1200 suspension as well as Brembo brakes, the upgraded Kawi Z2 should handle much better and come to a hault almost instantaneously. Also, thanks to the Yoshimura-tuned Mikuni TMR-MJN38 carburetion and Nitro Racing exhaust with titanium silencers, the blueprinted and balanced engine that originally developed 69bhp at 9000rpm now responds better to acceleration and sounds racy.

Overall, this is a clean looking bike which, despite having a few good years on its back, only needed a quick upgrade in order to keep up with its modern siblings from most points of view. That’s why we love Japanese bikes so much.

Source: bikeexif
Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

Although it looks like a whole new British bike, this is actually LSL’s Triumph Bonneville ‘Tridays’ Limited edition café racer that the German accessories and customizing specialists have built for the three-day Triumph motorcycle reunion held in Neukirchen, Austria this year from 25-27th of June.

Starting from a 2010 Bonneville , the LSL team has painted the alloy wheels in black and brought in a Remus exhaust, YSS shocks, new instrumentation, ace bars, racer-style seat and polished alloy mudguards, just to name a few of the bike’s distinctive features.

LSL will only build twenty such units and plans on selling them for $16,445 (€12,950). The price also includes a package trip to the Tridays festival. Visit the Tridays website for more information.

Source: MCN
Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

When former NASA engineer Casey Stevenson was in the market for a light, economical and enjoyable motorcycle to cruise the LA streets on, he came to find that there are no such bikes being currently made. So he considered turning a Suzuki S40 into a café racer and ended up creating the Ryca CS-1, a 650cc, air-cooled, single cylinder cafe racer prototype. Later, he thought at a way of turning his idea into money, so he founded Ryca Motors, the shop where they turn any Suzuki S40 or Savage model into veritable café racers.

Suzuki S40 café racer by Ryca Motors

The production version of the Ryca CS-1 features the middleweight single-cylinder engine and a five-speed tranny and returns 60 mpg. Café racer goodies such as the custom low profile tank with integrated keyswitch / indicator panel, fiberglass seat and side covers as well as rearsets with custom mounting bracket and hardware and aluminum clip-ons give the bike its unique look.

Because the original bike’s engine and chassis don’t require significant changes, Ryca Motors also offers a custom parts and accessories kit that owners can buy and install themselves. Click past the break to read about the four different possibilities of getting yourself on one of these and also what the kit includes.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

The Triumph Bonneville was the subject of infinite customization projects during the past decades and it seems that there’s always found a new way of turning GB’s iconic motorcycle into a better ride. Madame Bonnie represents such a project, but it comes from Italy, where Triumph specialists Pettinari have tricked it out.

No bike can be called a Bonnie unless the parallel-twin engine is present, so the Milan-based tuners retained the stock engine, but fitted it with 39mm Keihin CR racing carbs, a high performance air filter and a free-flow exhaust. These parts allow the motor to spin easier and sound much more aggressive.

Triumph Bonneville by Pettinari

Still, the main focus was on handling, so Madame Bonnie loses its stock suspension for Showa forks and Öhlins rear shocks. Also at the rear, a boxed aluminum swingarm was added. In the end, braking performance was significantly increased by adding Street Triple twin 310 mm front discs and Nissin calipers.

Surely, this custom retains its classy look, but technically it is a step further than anything going off the production line in Hinckley, England.

Source: visordown

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