parts accesories

parts accesories

Posted on by Maxx Biker 2

Take a look at this bike and you’ll most likely have troubles recognizing it as being a Triumph Speed Triple (at least we did), much less uncover the special features that made the transformation into custom possible. The bike was customized by Austrian Triumph specialist Julian Schneider for his own use on the twisties of the Austrian Alps.

Schneider, who is actually a fan of New Zealand motorcycle racer and land speed record holder Burt Munro, has actually called his bike the Burt Munro Edition. Although it won’t set any records as it is powered by the original engine, which only got some intake modifications and a Supertrapp exhaust, this Triumph should now handle and feel much sweeter considering the great number of aftermarket parts. It features full Ohlins suspensions and a steering damper, Marchesini magnesium wheels and a Beringer brake system. Also, the LSL bars, footrests and headlight as well as the Magura brake and clutch controls together with the several other Rizoma parts contribute at turning this into a completely different ride.

Overall, the bike looks like a modern café racer and the red/black with gold stripes and rims looks just striking.

Source: bikeexif
Posted on by Maxx Biker 3

Former 250 racer Roland Sands recently finished work on his latest café racer, one that originally started life as a Harley-Davidson XR1200 .

The bike looks miles away from the production version and considering the multitude of upgrades and modifications, it’s hard to find the best starting point. Probably the Ohlins forks, radial brakes and the front billet aluminum wheel from Performance Machine might represent just that, but it is a long way to the Ducati-like tubular single-sided arm and Ohlins shock at the back.

You’ll find that Roland Sands’ Harley-Davidson XR1200 cafe racer features clip-on handlebars and rearsets, a 2-1 from Vance and Hines as well as chain drive, just to mention a few of its unique features. Furthermore, the single seat behind the standard tank is what gives the bike that café racer look.

With a black-out chassis and a pentagram RSD logo and a 666 number over the matt black paint, this also qualifies as Satan’s machine. So what do you think about it?

Source: MCN
Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

Italian customizing specialists Gallimoto have recently presented three new Triumph Bonneville specials that they’ve put together. Called Bonneville Six Days, Goldenboy and Bullitt, the English bikes with an Italian feel are pretty much the same, but oh so very different.

The Italian way to Triumph

The Bonneville Six Days is based on the current Bonnie and stand out thanks to a khaki green paint job, black wire wheels, biturbo twin shocks and new indicators. The bike pays tribute to Steve McQueen who competed in the International Six Days Trial in 1964 on a Triumph and costs approximately $16.5K.

The Goldenboy started as a stock Bonneville SE, but now features black finished mag wheels, low fitted handlebars, an aluminum front mudguard and seat unit and megaton exhausts, but also Dunlop sportsmax-tires, sintered pads and adjustable twin shocks. Finished in red and gold, this special one also costs around $16.5K.

The Bullit gets mag wheels and Biturbo twin shocks as well as an alloy fuel cap and control levers and pressed aluminum chainguard, sprocket cover and front and rear mudguards. It is finished in silver and with a cost of approximately $16.8K it is the most expensive of them all although the difference is inconsiderable when you’re paying that much for a Bonneville.

Although these bikes don’t seem to have undergone radical customizing processes, they’re whole different stories than their standard siblings and we’re glad to see that café racer influences still catch on to the European motorcyclist today.

Source: MCN
Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

If someone had taken a look at KTM’s RC8 superbike and tried to build one in his own garage couldn’t have done a better job than the one done by Ian McElroy when, inspiring from the Austrian firm’s race-spec bike, has turned a 1987 Honda CBR 1000F into the nasty looking thing pictured above.

The custom bike features angular lines and aluminum hand-crafted fenders as well as a new subframe. In fact, welded sheets of aluminum form the bodywork, while the original 998cc, DOHC 16 valve inline-four was given a tune up using K&N filters and a custom-made exhaust system allowing the engine to breath much better and develop 130 horsepower. That’s worth of the Veypor gauges, which even records G-force, 0-60, quarter mile time and lap time apart from rpm and speed.

It is enough to take a look at the bike to realize that it required a great deal of work and dedication and the fact that it transmits that makes it even nicer. If we could only hear it go down the street…

Source: bikeexif
Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

Although the Yamaha XS650 is a decades-old bike, custom builders still spot potential in the middleweight parallel-twin, SOHC motor powering it and still going strong today. For instance, the guys from a small shop called An-Bu in Nagoya, Japan have managed to transform it into a stripped-back custom that would make even Brad Pitt proud when sitting behind its short bars.

The bike was stripped off its unnecessary parts and while the frame was modified for a lower and more aggressive stance, the original engine and wheels were kept. We like the new exhaust and entirely black painted wheels, but there’s actually much more to this custom. Take a look at the custom-made gas tank, seat and modified rear fender, but don’t go looking for a front fender because they’ve removed that entirely. Performance wheels do come in handy despite the fact that this looks like a very light bike and they don’t mention anything about engine performance being increased.

Looking at the Yamaha XS650 by An-Bu, it is easy to see what the Japanese idea for a custom is.

Source: bikeexif
Posted on by Maxx Biker 0

Harley-Davidson is a little too much into their style, so they rarely come up with a bike that is truly bad to the bone. But most of their ideas are taken one step further by people such as Mike Wilson of Dyno Mike’s Dynamic Chassis and Sandy Kosman of Kosman Specialties, who have teamed up to build what they call the Harley-Davidson XR124.

They’ve taken Harley’s sportiest ride, the XR1200 and made it look, sound and feel more appealing for the younger crowd, while still retaining the bike’s original style. In other words, they’ve mounted an S&S 124 cubic inch Evo engine on a twin shock rubber mount frame with a Buell XB12 front end (meaning upside down fork, front fender and six-piston caliper). The aluminum tank and rear fender were ordered from Evan Wilcox.

These guys aren’t just bike assemblers, so they’ve built their own exhaust and wheels. Overall, the thing weighs less than 500 pounds, which should make it flickable, while the power-to-weight ratio should make things at least very interesting.

As with most successful tuner projects, this bike looks like it was actually made like this by the manufacturer, but we can only wish H-D would build such a bike.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 2

The 2010 Kawasaki Z1000 is already one of the best Japanese nakeds around, but ways to make it better are always found either by riders individually or by tuners. These lasts have the habit of developing entire upgrade kits that set the bike miles away from its original state of new product that has just come out the factory gates.

Take the 2010 Roaring Toyz Kawasaki Z1000 case for example. The bike gets a set of Performance Machine wheels (17-inch front, 18-inch rear), 240-section rear tire, a custom-built braced swingarm and Brocks 4-2-1 exhaust, just to mention some of its most impressive new features.

The gold/silver paintjob does help at setting the bike apart from its standard siblings, but what we like the most about this project is the fact that it looks like that’s just the way Kawi did it in the first place. This is really one of those bikes that people see and ask “what is stock and what is aftermarket about it?” Click past the break to find out.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

Take a look at this gorgeous Ducati Streetfighter S ! It was modified by performance parts distributor Motovation Accessories using mostly Rizoma parts and accessories found in their 2010 catalog. The bike showcases the quality products from rear sets to engine covers and features a custom paintjob applied by Southern Metal Customs in Austin, Texas.

Although this is not a radical project, we happen to like it a lot for looking a hell lot more aggressive than the stock Streetfighter S and much more expensive as well. Hit the jump to see the whole list of parts thrown at it.

Photo credit: Will Gibson

Posted on by Maxx Biker 2

German BMW tuner AC Schnitzer finally got its hands on the S1000RR and turned it into a much better daily use superbike. That’s right. It may be hard to believe, but their approach aims towards comfort and practicability simply because the bike doesn’t need any upgrades on the performance side.

So, what’s new on it? Take the adjustable handlebars and yoke for instance. They’re straight and feature an adjustable clamp, definitely not an everyday fitment on a bike like this. Other new features on the AC Schnitzer S1000RR are the brake and clutch levers, a carbon fiber exhaust silencer, crash bungs, performance air-filter and a numberplate hanger, all leaving a distinct mark on the already kind of unique bike.

Source: MCN
Posted on by Maxx Biker 0

Honda barely introduced their latest big four model, the CB1100 and Japanese tuner Mugen has already released a package of bits and pieces for future owners to easily turn their nakeds into café racers worthy of the 1970s.

The café racer kit is mainly composed from a silver headlamp cowl and a racy looking seat, while the matt black fenders and sports exhausts are just the right touches to help set this bike further apart from the naked crowd and closer to the café racer one. Hit the jump for the Mugen CB1100 café racer action video.


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