> 
superbike

superbike


For all the classic Ducatis that were scheduled to be auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco, it’s nice to know that there were also modern examples waiting to be had. One of them was the 2002 Ducati 998R, a bike that was developed from the 2001 996R and comes in pretty limited availability.

Only 700 models of the 998R were built, and this particular model, CN: ZDMH200AA2B021283, was one of the bikes that was homologated to race specifications, allowing it to compete in the World Superbike Championship in 2001.

The 998R is powered by a 999 cc DOHC liquid-cooled Desmo V-twin engine that has been mated to a six-speed transmission. It carries a different crankcase from the standard 998 and came with a deep oil sump. It also had a more radical cam and an even more oversquare configuration with 104x58.8 mm bore and stroke.

The particular model auctioned in Monaco was number 635 of the 700 limited edition models. It only had 144 miles on its meter, and is considered being ’as-new’ condition. Bid price for this 2002 998R was expected to fetch about €6,000 - €8,000, which is around $7,700 - $10,400 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was a whopping $21,212. Someone wanted this bike bad!


The Ducati 1000 SS Corsa is an evolution from the Italian bike maker’s 900 SS, resulting in a bike that came powered with a 992 cc fuel-injected two-valve engine. This bike was capable of producing 84 horsepower with a top speed of 134 mph. Quite a quick runner, isn’t it?

The bike that was on bid at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco carried a simpler fairing, one that was based on the Supersport that ran from 1990 to 1997. It may look like a throwback to the 851/888, but the tank and seat are from an earlier SS.

The mileage on the bike is unknown, but this racing motorcycle, prepared by Carlo Saltarelli, was intended for privateers and is presented in good original condition with a Conti exhaust and presentable paintwork.

It would make for an exciting track day racer despite not carrying any racing history. The bid price for the bike was at €5,000 - €7,000, which is around $6,300 to $8,800 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $3,030.


The BMW R7 is truly a one-of-a-kind motorcycle that was introduced as a concept in 1934, but never produced. It did, however, inspire the R17 and R5 models. It was built during the height of the Art Deco movement, which is apparent by its very precise design that adheres to the standard mathematical basis of the Art Deco style, and is truly a pleasing piece.

After its conception, the R7 slipped away and was thought to be lost until it was rediscovered in 2005 and fully restored. It bears all black body panels with white outlines. Its wire wheels are painted a deep black to match the rest of the body. The body was like no other bike at the time, boasting smooth lines and fenders that partially wrapped around the wheels. Covering the engine are pieces of formed sheet metal to aid its aerodynamic qualities. Even the exposed cylinder heads are formed into a more aerodynamic dome shape.

The R7 boasts an 800 cc boxer engine that Leonhard Ischinger designed for BMW. It boasts a forged, 1-piece crankshaft for extra strength, and 1-piece cylinders and cylinder heads. Since the camshaft was under the crankshaft, the cylinders were positioned higher, leading to more effective valve positioning and even more ground clearance than the typical bike of the era. Coming off of the engine are two chrome fish-fin exhaust pipes.

This bike boasts a 4-speed manual transmission. Instead of the traditional foot shifter, the 1934 R7 boasts a car-style gear shifter to the right of the fuel filler cap.

There is no price placed on this bike, as it is a one-of-a-kind example that has never been sold on the open market. We are sure it would fetch upwards of $1 million at auction. We’ll never know, as its original discoverers are still in ownership and show no desire to sell it.

Image Credit: BMW museum Munich and ElfeJoyeux via Wikipedia


For a change, here’s one Ducati that’s went on auction at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco with less than 20 years of existence.

The Ducati 996 Biposto was first developed in 1999 from the 916 model, which also spurned the 955, the bike that Carl Fogarty rode on his way to World Superbike dominance in the mid 90’s.

Unlike some of the other Ducati models that were up for auction, the 996 Biposto came with relatively modern technology, beginning with a 996 cc fuel-injected, water-cooled DOHC Desmo V-twin engine that develops a powerful 122 horsepower with a top speed of 161 mph. Power from the engine courses through a six-speed transmission.

In addition to its ridiculous engine capabilities, the 996 Biposto also had the distinctive under-seat exhaust that set off a trend and is now being copied by almost every other manufacturer. The forks are upside-down Showa while the suspension - both front and rear - are adjustable. Likewise, the bike also comes with Brembo disc brakes, a single-sided rear swing-arm, and Marchesini five-spoke wheels.

The model that was auctioned off was the base 996 Biposto with CN: ZDMH200AAXB005641. The bike was expected to carry a bid price of about €3,500 - €5,000, which is around $4,500 - $6,500 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $5,152.


The BMW HP2 Sport has successfully made a stir in the industry, thanks to the racing dynamics it now espouses.

Of the many features of the HP2 Sport, it bears pointing out that the bike comes with an air/oil-cooled flat twin four stroke DOHC (with radial valves) engine that’s impressive by all accounts. The engine configuration also has a cylinder head cover made of carbon fiber with replaceable valve cover guards, a complete stainless steel exhaust system, a six-speed gearbox, a digital engine management with twin-spark ignition system, a double oil cooler, and a closed loop 3-way catalytic converter with oxygen sensor.

The HP2 Sport also has a slew of state-of-the-art features that will be a boon to its owners. It’s got a low beam headlamp height adjustment, an LED rear indicator, hazard warning flasher, a permanent headlamp beam, digital race instruments with 2D cluster, and an electronic immobilizer.

Last, the HP2 Sport doesn’t complete its package without the prevalent use of carbon fiber. In this case, the lightweight material is all over the bike, including the front and the rear, the self supporting body work, and the engine spoiler made of carbon fiber.

Find out more about the BMW HP2 Sport after the jump.


If you’re a bike that’s been bestowed the name "Hunk," you better live up to it...and then some.

Fortunately, the Hero Honda Hunk doesn’t have to worry about the proverbial backlash attached to its name. That’s because the bike has been a popular seller in the Indian market due to its dashing combination of good looks and performance know-how.

For the 2012 model, the overall look of the bike remains largely unchanged, although the addition of a digital instrument cluster is a refreshing bonus. The flared fenders and tubeless tires are also attractive to the eye, while the contoured visor gives it a sexy look. Finally, the Hunk also comes with an LED tail light, a ridged muffler cover, and front and rear disc brakes.

At the heart of the Hunk, you’ll find a 150cc air-cooled, four-stroke, single cylinder engine that produces a tidy 14 horsepower at 8,500 rpm and 12.8 Nm of torque at 6,500 rpm.

All told, the Hero Honda Hunk is a bike that has been designed to be most suited for youngsters, especially college students. In addition, the bike claims to have a ’big bike feel,’ which is the most popular and sought after kind of bike in the Indian market.

Find out more about the Hero Honda Hunk after the jump.

We admit it; it’s easy to get caught up in a bike that pretty much gives you everything you ask for. Having said that, it’s even easier to get excited over the Hero Honda Achiever, a bike that distinguishes itself for its imposing looks and performance credentials.

The body parts of the Hero Honda Achiever are bolder than what you’d expect from a bike of this stature. It’s also got some interesting color options, making it true eye candy.

More than that, the Achiever certainly lives up to its name by coming loaded with unique features, including a front side that has a bigger mask housing a halogen lamp and position lamp. The halogen lamp and position lamp are both integrated in a butterfly-shaped headlamp cluster. The other features are a large black tinted wind screen, front turn indicators on the side panels of the mask, and rear view mirrors that are placed at the standard handlebars.

The Hero Honda Achiever carries some digital features also, most of which you can find on the dashboard. Analog meters - the speedometer, tripmeter, and fuel gauge - can also be found on the dash, making it easy for riders to keep tabs on the bike.

Most of all, the Achiever’s one pretty stout ride. Powering this glorious steed is a 150cc air-cooled, four-stroke, single cylinder OHC engine that produces 13.4 horsepower at 8,000 rpm and 12.80 Nm at 5,000 rpm.

Find out more about the Hero Honda Achiever after the jump.


If you said that the Yamaha YZF R15 is the best looking bike in India, you wouldn’t be entirely wrong. Taken from the DNA of the global Yamaha YZF R1 series, the YZF R15 looks the part of a beast on two wheels. The front portion of the bike is exactly fully-covered while the rear portion continues to be naked.

The cowl on the bike looks stylish with two eyes serving the purpose of twin headlamps. Furthermore, the windscreen on the top of the cowl also looks impressive while the black rear view mirrors are accompanied by the large airscoops. A nice long shape and a sparking body color really catch our attention.

The bike’s design was also done to provide enough space for the rider and contribute a lot to the looks of the machine. The only visible part of the engine’s exterior can be seen from the side view while the other parts are covered in front fairing. Enough space for seating is left for one person. On the other hand, the nice rear grab bars are placed at the top of the rear portion.

The YZF-R15 also comes with five spoke alloy wheels and a nice shaped muffler. The latter is also painted black while the rear end is in white. Both disc brakes at the tires not only ensures good braking, but also guarantees a good looking bike that you can take out on the road with pride.

Find out more about the Yamaha YZF-R15 after the jump.

When Ducati began using carbon fiber on their bikes, they predictably used it on a limited edition, single-seat Ducati 900 Super Sport . Built from 1992 to 1996 as the Ducati 900 Superlight, the bike used the aforementioned carbon fiber material on a number of its components, particularly the mudguards and the clutch cover.

Initially, the Italian bike maker wanted to build 500 models of the bike, but bumped that up to 900 pieces after incessant public demand. After the 900 Superlight enjoyed success in the market, Ducati built the Superlight II in 1993, replacing the composite wheels with Brembo units and adding a floating rear disc brakes setup. They also fitted in a powerful 904 cc V-twin SOHC Desmo engine that produced 73 horsepower and was mated to a six-speed transmission.

The Superlight II that was auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco was model no. 34 of the 1993 series. It came in original condition, had good paint, and is considered one of the rare super bikes that would find a nice home in a motorcycle collector’s garage.

The bike sold for €4,095 ($5,260), below the estimated auction price of €4,500 - €6,000 ($5,800 - $7,700).


Exclusively sold in Italy to go with other Super Sport models , the Ducati 350 Super Sport was built as a smaller displacement model from 1989 to 1993 and traces its lineage to Ducati’s highly popular 900 cc Super Sport.

The 350 Super Sport was far from a slouch; it was powered by a 341 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine that was mated to a five-speed transmission, producing a stout 27 horsepower. Despite the svelte and sporty look, the 350 Super Sport was actually considered an economical bike, at least compared to the 400 cc Super Sport that was released in Japan and Germany until 1995 and the 600 cc Super Sport that was in production from 1993-1997.

The Ducati 350 Super Sport that was auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco came in original condition, complete with a nice red paint finish. However, the bike was also noted as "needing some work," which probably explains why it only sold for €585 ($750), a number that’s far below its pre-auction estimated price of €2,800 - €3,800 ($3,600 - $4,900).


Back to top