supersports

supersports

Some classic and historical bikes are really worth all the pretty pennies you can afford. This 1976 Ducati 860 Corsa is one of them.

Created in 1973 after Ducati elected to contest endurance races, which had no engine size restrictions, the 860 Corsa became one of the most competitive race bikes the Italian bike maker has ever built. To ensure that the bike carried as much wallop as it could have, Ducati bored the 750-cc engine to accept racing pistons from the 450 single. This resulted in an 864 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine that was mated to a five-speed transmission with an output of up to 90 horsepower at 8,200 rpm. With these racing modifications, in tow, the 860 Corsa was able to notch double victories at Barcelona’s 24-hour race at Montjuich Park.

The model that was auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco is a very clean example of a 1976 square-case 900 SS racer, with right hand gearshift, NCR-style fairing and the handsome original Imola fiberglass tank. It has Campagnolo alloy wheels, Marzocchi forks with the desirable center axle, adjustable rear Marzocchi shocks, a 2-into-1 competition exhaust and Dell’Orto 40-mm carburetors. It carries no race number, but the restoration work appears to have been recent and is in tip-top shape.

The expected auction price for the 860 Corsa was about €18,000 - €20,000, which is around $23,300 - $25,800 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $6,061.

If you go back to the history of Ducati , you’ll know that the 60’s wasn’t exactly all too kind to the Italian bike maker. With the onus being dubiously put on producing two-stroke bikes, Ducati went back to bikes in the latter part of the decade, developing the "wide-case" single engine in ’67 and ushering a whole new range of bikes that included the Ducati 250 Mark 3.

Despite carrying the same basic overhead-camshaft engine architecture, the 1970 250 Mark 3 featured revised crankcases that were much wider at the rear where it mounted the frame. The sump capacity was increased to 2.5 litres, and the kick-start was much stronger, as was the new rear frame section. Add all that with a 249 cc SOHC single engine mated to a five-speed transmission and you had a bike that was clearly worth all the attention it received.

In addition to receiving a single filler fuel tank, the 1970 250 Mark 3 also received a speedometer and tachometer mounted on the top triple clamp instead of in the headlight shell. The example that was presented at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco is an older restoration model that is in very good condition, with good chrome and a very original specification.

This classic Ducati had an estimated selling price of about €3,000 - €4,000, which is about $3,800 - $5,200 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $4,545.

When Ducati introduced a non-Desmo version of the 350 Super Sport, it paved the way for a new line of bikes that have come to be known as the 350 GTV. Built from 1977 to 1981, the 350 GTV model weren’t the most powerful or most reliable Ducatis in history.

That’s why through a strange twist of fate, finding one in good working condition these days is a Herculean task. Never mind the fact that the 350 GTV comes with a 350 cc SOHC twin engine that’s mated to a five-speed transmission, this particular example sets itself apart because of its model name.

This particular 350 GTV is in sound original form and comes with a two-tone bright green paint and good chrome. If anyone wants to have an ideal Ducati in their collection, the 350 GTV is definitely one of options.

The bike was at the RM Auctions in Monaco and came with an estimated bid price of €3,000 - €4,000, which is about $3,769 - $5,026 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $1,515.

The Ducati 1000 SS Corsa is an evolution from the Italian bike maker’s 900 SS, resulting in a bike that came powered with a 992 cc fuel-injected two-valve engine. This bike was capable of producing 84 horsepower with a top speed of 134 mph. Quite a quick runner, isn’t it?

The bike that was on bid at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco carried a simpler fairing, one that was based on the Supersport that ran from 1990 to 1997. It may look like a throwback to the 851/888, but the tank and seat are from an earlier SS.

The mileage on the bike is unknown, but this racing motorcycle, prepared by Carlo Saltarelli, was intended for privateers and is presented in good original condition with a Conti exhaust and presentable paintwork.

It would make for an exciting track day racer despite not carrying any racing history. The bid price for the bike was at €5,000 - €7,000, which is around $6,300 to $8,800 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $3,030.

With a market that’s growing more and more competitive by the day, Honda is bringing the CBR 150R to compete against the likes of the Yamaha R15 V20 and the KTM Duke 200 . Even better, they gave this bike a special edition treatment courtesy of a unique Repsol livery.

Fitted with a 150 cc, DOHC 4-stroke, 1-cylinder engine and mated to a six-speed transmission, the CBR 150R Repsol Edition is a serious contender to the throne of the entry level sports bike. At the heart of this bike, you will find a radiator with a cooling system and the a injection system (PGFM-FI).

The bike is also available in two variants - Standard and Deluxe - with both offering a unique riding experience to the rider. For the Standard version, it will have a cost of around 116,385 Rupee whereas the Deluxe has a cost of around 117,385 Rupee.

With all of these items in tow, the CBR 150R Repsol Edition has a great chance to be the rival for the other bikes, especially for the Yamaha R15 and KTM Duke 200.

Find out more about the Honda CBR 150R Repsol Edition.

The Honda CBR 250R is returning to India with minor changes, something that should be music to the ears of a lot of people.

For the styling, this CBR 250 comes with some new color options, such as the combination of Blue-White-Red. The plastic quality has been increased and the engine is now more powerful and efficient due to the re-mapping of the ECU.

Speaking of the engine, the CBR 250R employs a 250 cc one-cylinder engine that produces 25 horsepower at 8,500 rpm and 22.9 Nm of torque at 7,000 rpm. Compared to the KTM Duke , the CBR 250R is heavier, weighing 167 kg compared to only 136 for the Duke. Nevertheless, the difference shouldn’t be all that significant considering the CBR 250R carries some additional features that its rival does not.

Among these features include a Combi Brake System (CBS) and a re-setting of the ECU that riders can have as an added option.

Find out more about the Honda CBR 250R after the jump.

The Honda VRF 1200F has been described as the future of Honda’s fleet of motorcycle. Coming with a complete package of style and advanced technology, the VRF 1200F is proof that a bike can be both powerful and fuel efficient.

Thanks to its 1,237cc engine that’s capable of generating 170 horsepower, there are few bikes in the world that can compete with this Japanese buzz saw. Moreover, the 6 Speed Cruise Drive Transmission that was used in this super bike and the V-4 type of engine have been accommodated to assure enhanced performance. In addition to the engine, this bike was chrome finished and the body has given an aerodynamic shape.

Honda has been known as a company that puts forth an effort in producing completely glorious products to their costumers. Honda also has a high expectation for good sales with the release of this bike in India. So, yeah, a lot is riding on the VRF 1200F to be the bike it’s claimed to be.

Helping in all that hype are a number of new technologies that have been added to the street bike, particularly a Dual-Clutch-Transmission (DCT) which can be used with separate modes for Drive, Cruising, and Sports purposes. This aggressive bike also comes with an electric start and a paddle shift which supports manual changing of gears.

To make sure that the rider and the pillion feel comfortable, this Honda VRF 1200F is fitted with a wealth of comfort and advanced features. The long and wide seat of this bike offers a painless riding experience to the rider as well as the pillion.

Find out more about the Honda VRF 1200F after the jump.

For a change, here’s one Ducati that’s went on auction at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco with less than 20 years of existence.

The Ducati 996 Biposto was first developed in 1999 from the 916 model, which also spurned the 955, the bike that Carl Fogarty rode on his way to World Superbike dominance in the mid 90’s.

Unlike some of the other Ducati models that were up for auction, the 996 Biposto came with relatively modern technology, beginning with a 996 cc fuel-injected, water-cooled DOHC Desmo V-twin engine that develops a powerful 122 horsepower with a top speed of 161 mph. Power from the engine courses through a six-speed transmission.

In addition to its ridiculous engine capabilities, the 996 Biposto also had the distinctive under-seat exhaust that set off a trend and is now being copied by almost every other manufacturer. The forks are upside-down Showa while the suspension - both front and rear - are adjustable. Likewise, the bike also comes with Brembo disc brakes, a single-sided rear swing-arm, and Marchesini five-spoke wheels.

The model that was auctioned off was the base 996 Biposto with CN: ZDMH200AAXB005641. The bike was expected to carry a bid price of about €3,500 - €5,000, which is around $4,500 - $6,500 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $5,152.

This 1965 Ducati 250 GP is only a replica model of the iconic 250 GP super bike, but that doesn’t mean that it should be ignored. On the contrary, this bike is a living testament to what people will do to ensure that they’re replicas are as close to the real models as possible.

The bike was constructed to competition specs, including the addition of Ducati’s big-valve 250-cc SOHC engine. The engine comes with twin plugs, a single Dell’Orto PHF32CS pumper carburetor, a five-speed gearbox, straight-cut primary gears, and a competition clutch.

Quite a replica, huh?

There’s more too. The "replica" 350 GP also has a full fairing, Veglia tachometer, clip-on bars, rear sets, twin leading-shoe front brake, a left-side gear change, and last but certainly not least, a Conti megaphone exhaust, as well as a quick-release fiberglass fuel tank.

Needless to say, this red and silver 250 GP replica was built with the most laborious attention to detail as any replica we’ve seen in years. Maybe that’s why it was pegged for an auction price from €14,000 - €18,000 ($18,000 - $23,000) at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco. Actual selling price was $10,606.

A 200-horsepower bike is no joke and the fact that it’s a limited edition model that only carries 100 units only adds to its prestige. The MV Augusta F4CC is that kind of bike.

Based on the F4, the F4CC was built in 2007 as a limited edition model in honor of the company’s founder, Claudio Castiglioni. The bike came with a ridiculous 1,078 cc engine that produced a staggering 200 horsepower. In order to achieve the increased displacement, MV Augusta increased the bike’s bore and stroke while also adding lighter pistons, stronger connecting rods, a one-of-a-kind slipper clutch, plenty of exotic materials, and a full-titanium exhaust system, resulting in a bike that weighs 8.8 lbs less than a standard F4R model.

This particular model was in superb condition and only had 2,030 km of mileage. It’s no wonder that for a bike that cost €100,000 ($125,000) brand new, it was scooped up at a recent auction for €49,725, which is about $62,700 based on current exchange rates.


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