supersports

supersports

The 2012 Yamaha V-Max is the kind of bike that should be on top of everybody’s wish list. It’s not so much the fact that it’s an awesome ride in itself, but the bike’s combination of advanced sportbike technology and forward thinking style makes it a definite must-have.

Sure, some people have had mixed reactions as far as the bike’s design is concerned, but make no mistake about it, when it comes to pure, torque-bending performance, the V-Max is in a class of its own.

Crank the throttle and you’ll be unleashing a 1,679cc, 65-degree, liquid-cooled, fuel-injected four-valves-per-cylinder, DOHC engine that pumps out 174 horsepower, enough to literally make you drive the seat off of your pants. On top of that, the V-Max also has both the Yamaha Chip Controlled Intake (YCC-I) technology and the Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle (YCC-T) technology, providing the kind of smooth and crisp response riders have long looked for.

As far as its design, the V-Max’s looks remain relatively unchanged since its major redesign in 2009. About the only changes you’ll see is that it comes with a new color, Matte Black, as well as new side-cover finishes that match the bike’s distinctive intake cover, and gray stitching on the seat cover.

The bike also features a lightweight aluminum chassis - weight is reduced to 683 lbs because of it - that puts the engine low and forward for mass centralization, resulting in a machine designed to handle just about any road surface. Likewise, the suspension system - cartridge-damper-type front forks that have substantial 52mm inner tubes with oxidized titanium coating and a link-type Monocross rear suspension - allows the bike to handle particularly well, even for the high standards of a tried-and-true muscle bike.

Find out more about the full specs of the Yamaha V-Max after the jump.

America has waited enough, Honda . Now the Japanese company is finally dropping the wait after announcing the arrival of the 2012 HRC NSF250R . Developed for the FIM GP road racing competition in the Moto3 class, the NSF250R promises to live up to the hype - and so much more.

It’s powered by an all-new liquid-cooled single-cylinder 249cc four-stroke engine that has been specifically designed for racing. The sleek design features technical highlights that include a front-intake and rear-exhaust configuration with a high charging efficiency. To be able to generate strong power throughout the high-rpm range, the NSF250R also comes with titanium valves for both the intake and exhaust to reduce friction and lighten the valve train.

Furthermore, the NSF250R’s design reduces friction between piston and cylinder, improving the bike’s overall durability by offsetting the cylinder centerline and applying nickel silicon carbide (Ni-SiC) for the cylinder surface treatment. Lightweight and well-balanced, the NSF250R offers impressive power output and superb handling to achieve a great blend of high performance plus rider-friendly traits well suited to up-and-coming racers.

"This is a great opportunity for people who want to start road racing with a full-on track bike," said Keith Dowdle, Assistant Manager Honda Riders Club of America. "Now riders have the option of buying a purpose-built race-ready motorcycle right out of the box, as an alternative to modifying a street bike—all at a reasonable price of $28,599."

Orders for the bike are now open so if you’re planning to purchase bikes to race in 2012 moto-racing series, now’s the time do so.

In the world of sports bikes, you really would be hard-pressed to find a bike that is more capable inside and out than the Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R ABS . Not only does it come with Kawasaki ’s world-renowned craftsmanship, but it also carries some of the latest in sports bike technology, most of which have been derived from MotoGP.

Don’t be confused by the anti-lock braking on the ZX-10R ABS; the system was designed and developed specifically for the purpose of providing maximum on-track performance for the bike. And when you consider the many safety- and control-oriented benefits provided by the amazing electronic and hardware technology available today, it begins to make a lot of sense.

Think of it: You’re charging into a hairpin during a track day. It’s late in the afternoon, you’re tired, and your front tire is shagged from a day of hard-core knee-dragging. But instead of tucking as you squeeze the front brake lever, your front tire chirps briefly and the KIBS system intervenes until traction returns – allowing you to arc gracefully into the corner, a little wiser and a lot more intact physically than if you were riding a non-ABS motorcycle. On the street, anti-lock’s benefits are even easier to realize.

Hit the jump for more information on the 2011 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R ABS.

Take a look at the Kawasaki Concours 14 and it’ll only take a few seconds before you have to pick your jaws off of the floor. The bike’s all-new bodywork gives the new Concours 14 an even more aggressive demeanor, highlighted by an electric-adjustable windscreen that creates a bigger still-air pocket for the rider and passenger. New ducts above the instrument panel relieve the low pressure area behind the windscreen while standard grip heaters lets you keep your hands warm in cold conditions.

In terms of performance, the Concours 14 doesn’t lack in power, thanks to a 1,352cc four-stroke, liquid-cooled, DOHC engine that produces the kind of power that riders weep over. A big part of the Concours 14’s wide powerband can be attributed to its variable valve timing (VVT) system that alters camshaft profiles to boost low-end and mid-range torque without sacrificing top-end power. The bike also has advanced fuel injection, sub-throttle valves, ram-air induction, and decades of experience building the world’s most potent motorcycle engines add up to an amazing powerplant, a huge force to be reckoned with in the performance sport-touring segment.

The bike also has a monocoque frame that provides massive structural integrity along with excellent handling characteristics. The compact structure of the frame allows optimum packaging of the bike’s vital systems. There’s also a Tetra-Lever shaft drive that sends all that power rearward through a four-link design to offset the lifting and squatting tendencies when the throttle is opened and closed, resulting in true sportbike handling that the Kawasaki Concours has made name on.

Find out more about the Kawasaki Concours 14’s specs after the jump.

The Yamaha FZ8 has been built to offer the perfect compromise for riders who feel that a 600cc bike is too small, but a 1,000cc bike is too big.

The bike really is the best of both worlds, providing a carefully optimized crankshaft to deliver the perfect power curve and torquey performance character for this category while also including new top-end components that are usually reserved for its more powerful counterparts.

The FZ8’s mass-forward naked-bike styling also lends a look of a bike that’s less about flash and more about its performance and handling capabilities. Anybody that has ever ridden a 600cc bike and found it a little lacking in ’oomph’ will love the FZ8. Similarly, those people that find a 1,000cc to be an overkill will be delighted with this Yamaha sportsbike.

You add these two markets together and this sportsbike is the quintessential machine hitting two markets in one awesome package.

Find out more about the Yamaha FZ8 after the jump.

Award-winning bikes are universally lauded for a reason: they live up to the hype surrounding them and are far better than what a lot of people think. One bike that falls into that category is the Yamaha YZF-R1.

Named the 2009 Motorcycle of the Year by Motorcyclist Magazine, the Yamaha YZR-F1 is the embodiment of a class-leading bike that offers the kind of technology usually reserved for its race-spec brethren.

But that’s why this superbike is what it is: it’s got a MotoGP-inspired engine and chassis technology to go with an up-standard and luxurious design. It’s also the only commercial motorcycle to carry a crossplane crankshaft, which is a technology pioneered by Yamaha for their MotoGP race bikes.

The fact that a production motorcycle is carrying race-specs is a telling sign that the YZF-R1 was built for the most hardened enthusiasts on the market.

Find out more about the Yamaha YZF-R1 after the jump.

Sometimes, we wake up on any given day with a sudden urge to part ways with as much of our disposable income as we could. Don’t deny it; you’ve probably been in that same boat at one point or another.

So suppose that day suddenly comes and you just had a dream of riding along the highway with a sportsbike, we suggest that you turn that dream into a reality and cash in on a Yamaha YZF-R6 .

Yamaha is touting the bike as most ’exciting bike to ride on the track and the most fun sport bike to ride on winding roads.’ That alone should say something about the YZF-R6. Add that to the fact that Yamaha engineers tweaked the mid range performance last year and you have a bike that’s oozing in confidence, agility, performance, and, most importantly, fun.

The YZF-R6 showcases the latest in Yamaha ’s sport bike technologies, including a screaming, 15,000-rpm plus fuel injected four cylinder engine in a taut chassis that lets it snap from upright to full lean instantly.

Find out more about the Yamaha YZF-R6 after the jump.

Much like the Honda CB1000R , the new Honda CBR1000RR has a strange name. But more than their shared commonality for long alpha-numeric designations, the CB1000R and the CBR1000RR also have one thing in common: they’re two of the best sportsbikes on the market.

As a matter of fact, the latter has been touted ’revolutionary’ by more than one expert while also establishing new standards for a light weight, superlative handling, remarkably compact bike with exceptional performance numbers to boot.

Talking about its performance capabilities, the Honda CBR1000RR is powered by a powerful 999cc liquid-cooled inline four-cylinder engine with a close-ratio six-speed transmission. This setup is joined by an inverted HMAS cartridge fork with spring preload, rebound, and compression damping adjustability and a Unit Pro-Link HMAS single shock rear suspension with the same spring preload, rebound, and compression damping adjustability of the front suspension. The bike also features 320mm front brake discs with dual radial-mounted four-piston calipers to go with a single 220mm brake disc.

In a world dominated by high-powered superbikes that are more one-dimensional than anything else, the Honda CBR1000RR offers a unique blend of simple and casual styling to go with outstanding performance numbers.

Now if they can only do something about shortening its name...

Find out more about the Honda CBR1000RR specs after the jump

Cars may be more practical than motorcycles for a lot or different reasons, but if you’re the free-wheeling type that enjoys the breath of freedom that only bikes can provide, then the latter is definitely right inside your wheel house.

Now as far as picking the right bike is concerned, you’ll have plenty of varieties to choose from, including Honda and its latest sportsbike offering, the CB1000R .

Dressed in a clean, essentials-only styling that belies its superbike capabilities, the CBR1000 was built using a sophisticated Gravity Die-Cast technology with a mono-backbone aluminum frame that is strong yet features thin-wall construction to ensure the bike is as light as a feather. The bike’s seating position - a short, compact and lightweight seat and tail cowl - delivers excellent rider comfort and tremendous versatility for long-distance travel. There’s also a stylish three-section LCD instrument panel features a multi-segment LCD tachometer and a distinctive triangular multi-reflector headlight, with unique LED position light.

As far as power is concerned, the CB1000R comes with a fuel-injected four-cylinder 998cc powerplant that boasts of Honda’s esteemed sports and racing tradition. The engine has been tuned for loads of right-now power to go with a single-sided swingarm with single-shock rear suspension.

The Honda CB1000R has been described in a variety of ways, but whatever description you can think of for it, one thing will always remain true: it’s a true modern iteration of a long line of classic, high-performance, hot-rod Hondas.

And judging by the early returns, it’s doing its predecessors proud.

Find out more about the Honda CB1000R’s specs after the jump

Any seasoned rider will tell you that diving into a hardcore bike isn’t the proper way to get acclimated to motorcycles. You need to get your feet wet first. You need a bike that will show you the ropes while also provide the kind of excitement and thrills that only a true sports bike can provide.

The innovative Yamaha FZ6R is one of those bikes and it offers features that make it easy for beginning riders to get started. There are no boastful expectations with the FZ6R; it’s simply a bike that will give you everything you need to get started.

While other bikes will promise torque-twisting performance, the FZ6R doesn’t make such claims. It’s a ride that does complete justice to the term ’sports bike’, inspiring the kind of rider confidence that has made it one of the most popular sports bikes on the market today.

No frills. No flair. No flash. Just the way the Yamaha FZ6R likes it.

Find out more about the Yamaha FZ6R after the jump.


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