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trail

trail


When you a have a kid that has shown an inclination to riding bikes, at some point, they’re going to start clamoring for something with a little more edge than just bells and pedals.

Fortunately, Kawasaki has the KLX110 , a bike that was designed to get young ones acclimated to a two-wheeled ride with an engine on it. The KLX110 is not overly complicated; it’s a bike that features plenty of grin-inducing properties, including its confidence-inspiring performance and accessibility to young people and grownups alike.

Inspired with KX-style bodywork, the 2012 KLX110 comes with a design that includes a gas tank, an MX-style seat, side panels, shrouds and fenders, and a comfortable handlebar, all which look as if they came straight off the race winning KX450F.

The KLX110 is also the picture of versatility, thanks in part to an easy-to-ride 111cc four-stroke engine that offers plenty of torque and push-button electric that makes for comfortable riding. To make the KLX110 even more beginner-friendly, it’s equipped with Kawasaki’s automatic centrifugal clutch system, allowing easy no-clutch shifting while a semi-automatic gearbox boasts four speeds to access the KLX’s full spread of torque.

Optimum wheel and chassis control is also another highlight of the KLX110. A single shock offers 4.3" of travel and plenty of bottoming resistance while a beefy, 30mm telescopic fork offering 4.3" of wheel travel tames the bumps up front. Tapered roller bearings at the bottom of the steering stem add durability to what is essentially one of the best value bikes on the market.

Whether you’re a young kid or an elder kid-at-heart, the Kawasaki KLX110 is the right kind of ’fun’ bike for you.

Find out more about the Kawasaki KLX110 after the jump.

Whatever kind of surface the Kawasaki KLR 650 finds itself on, you’ll be sure that it’s going to stand out from the rest of the pack. Whether its in the sand, the dirt, the forests, and the pavement, the KLR 650 adapts to the environment with seamless ease.

The dual-sport bike’s versatility is a hallmark of Kawasaki engineering and combined with a rugged single-cylinder engine that provides incredible fuel efficiency, the KLR 650 is a clear choice as far as all-terrain riding is concerned.

An expansive, saddlebag-friendly, rear aluminum luggage rack that can be fitted with a tail bag helps make the KLR650 a worthy touring companion. The bike also has a large, 5.8-gallon fuel tank and exemplary fuel economy means the KLR650 can cover an amazing amount of ground between fill-ups. Comfort is without qualms too, thanks to an ergonomic set design that’s further enhanced by a plush urethane foam. A high-capacity 36-watt alternator is also an important element of the bike, pumping out enough juice for a high-output headlight with extra capacity providing power to its add-on electronic gadgets.

The bike is also powered by a single-cylinder, 651cc four-stroke engine that comes with a quick throttle response and a healthy low-end grunt. The engine finds a suitable match with the bike’s new suspension system, a 41mm fork with 7.9" of suspension travel up front, and a Uni-Trak" linkage system providing 7.3" of wheel travel in the rear. Likewise, braking duties for the KLR 650 are handled by a dual-piston caliper gripping a 280mm petal-style disc in the front, and a 240mm petal-style disc squeezed by a single-piston caliper in the rear.

This suspension and brake package, combined with the powerful 650cc engine, makes the KLR650 the ideal everyday commuter.

Find out more about the Kawasaki KLR 650 after the jump.


Everybody should have the opportunity to enjoy the thrills of riding a dirt bike. Yes, that includes the young kids that enjoy the trails and don’t mind getting their hands and feet dirty.

For these adventurous little ones - and some adults too - Kawasaki has their new KLX110L . Similar to the KLX110, the 110L version sports a
reliable four-stroke engine, automatic-clutch drivetrain and easy to use push-button starter. It’s the kind of bike that anybody in the family would love to ride, whether its the kids or the adults.

What makes the KLX110L different from the 110 is that it takes all the features of the latter and brings it up another level. The L-model incorporates several key features that make it even more accessible to an even wider range of riders, allowing those slightly larger, slightly more experienced riders to climb aboard and enjoy the thrills and excitement these little green thumpers can provide.

The L-model is slightly taller than the standard 110, due to its 2.4"longer fork that has 5.5" of travel and a longer shock out back, which offers 5.2" of wheel travel. The result is a seat height that measures 28.7," which is nearly 2" taller than that of the KLX110 version. As a result, the suspension comes with optimal spring and damping settings, giving those slightly larger riders the ability to push the KLX110L as hard as they choose.

In terms of performance, the KLX110 is powered by the same 111cc four-stroke, SOHC, two-valve single engine as the KLX110. Combined with the engine, Kawasaki also fitted the KLX110 with a manual clutch and a four-speed gearbox, giving more aggressive riders the opportunity to enjoy every ounce of performance from the engine.

When it comes to introductory motocross bikes, no other of its kind has the clout of the Kawasaki KLX110L. The proof is very much in the bike itself.

Find out more about the Kawasaki KLX110L after the jump.

Not everybody is fully equipped in jumping into a full-fledged motocross bike off the bat. Some people need to get used to them and Kawasaki has the perfect bike for the job: The KX100 .

As one of the best entry-level motocross bikes for novice riders, the KX100 helps bridge the gap between classes, providing growing adolescent riders with a machine that accommodates both their growing skill base and their physical size while also giving them an ideal tool to hone their skills before jumping onto a bigger bike.

The KX100 is a simply designed bike that offers nothing in excess. If there was any, the aggressive graphics in the bike that matches its black frame could probably constitute as that. But more than just stickers and graphics, the KX100 comes with a 99cc liquid-cooled two-stroke engine that offers more power and a broader spread of it than the KX85. It also has a 28mm Keihin carburetor and carbon-fiber reed valve assembly, providing a crisp throttle response while the Kawasaki Integrated Power-valve System helps produce a powerband with good low-end torque and a strong top-end rush. The power then passes onto a smooth-shifting six-speed transmission, giving the KX a gear for every situation on the race track.

As far as its handling and set-up are concerned, the KX100 comes with an adjustable long-travel suspension at both ends to help smooth even the roughest motocross circuits. The 36mm inverted cartridge fork has compression damping adjustment capability, whereas the UNI-TRAK rear suspension system has a shock absorber that’s more than capable for a variety of purposes, including spring preload, compression, and rebound damping. As for the brakes, the KX100 has front and rear discs that are mounted with shoulder bolts for easier maintenance.

Find out more bout the Kawasaki KX100 after the jump.


The Kawasaki KX250F is a certified award-winning bike, as evidenced by its continued dominance in the AMA Supercross series. So it figures that when you have a bike that’s as proven and tested as this one, it’s going to translate to the consumer market.

And that’ precisely what the KX250F has done.

For the 2012 model, the Kawasaki motocrosser offers a list of enhancements that allow the bike to be even more powerful, while also improving its handling and overall durability.

The KX250F offers cutting-edge technology right off the showroom floor, to give riders the winning edge on the track. Along with the KX250F’s race-proven performance, no other production motocrosser offers as much adjustability, fine-tuning capabilities, and rider customization when it comes to motor and suspension.

The design of the bike remains largely the same as that of its predecessor. But that’s not to say that the 2012 model doesn’t come with its share of improvements, particularly on the performance level.

We already know the bike carries a 249cc, liquid-cooled, four-stroke, four-valve, single-cylinder DOHC engine that delivers hard-hitting power across the rpm range. But for 2012, Kawasaki engineers wanted to create a bike with even more impressive top-end performance, which they accomplished by equipping its Digital Fuel Injection system with a second fuel injector –a first for use on production motocross bikes– located near the airbox intake. The all-new “upstream” injector helps build a wider and more potent spread of power as rpm climbs. The two fine-mist atomizing injectors that feed the 250cc four-stroke powerplant are distinct in appearance with different body sizes, but deliver the same per-cycle capacity.

Together, Kawasaki’s dual injectors offer the kind of a one-two punch that delivers more headings of fuel on acceleration to increase the high-rpm power and overall capabilities of the KX250F.

Find out more about the Kawasaki KX250F after the jump.


The race-winning heritage of the Kawasaki KX450F is a testament to the motocross bike’s outstanding capabilities, not just with its superb power, but also with the kind of confident handling that riders enjoy. Racing has always been at the forefront for the KX450F, and the 2012 model ads plenty of technical innovations that have been developed from the factory know-how of the Monster Energy Kawasaki race team, with the end result suggesting an unmatched combination of cutting-edge innovation and race-proven components.

The 2012 highlights of the KX450R start with the Supercross-winning DNA of last year’s bike. The advanced design of the aluminum perimeter frame and dominating motor receive a host of modifications, creating a more squeezed-in and mass-centralized chassis that produces more power than at any other time in the bike’s esteemed history.

The design of the bike also plays into the various features that are included in the overall package. For instance, the 2012 KX450F comes with a choice of four different handlebar positions, two footpeg positions, and virtually unlimited ignition mapping capabilities that are owed to the Kawasaki’s advanced Digital Fuel Injection system.

Inside the KX450F lies a powerful and reliable 449cc liquid-cooled, DOHC, four-stroke single engine that delivers improved mid- to high-end power and a wider powerband, thanks to numerous upgrades.

A new wrinkle added to the KX450F is the Launch Control Mode, a feature that’s been tuned to maximize traction out of the starting gate. Activating the Launch Control mode is a unique key that can be turned and used before a push-button system is activated by a touch of the switch on the left handlebar. The Launch Control’s effectiveness is further enhanced by a chassis designed to maximize suspension performance and rear wheel traction.

Find out more about the Kawasaki KX459F after the jump.

Just like its twin brother, the Off-Road TT-R230 , the 2012 TT-R230 is a serious trail bike that is accessible to a wide range of riders, especially beginners. It’s got a Yamaha YZ-inspired design that features a low seat height, and a simple and easy-to-read instrumentation panel.

The bike also has a simple engine set-up that features a stout 223cc air-cooled, SOHC four-stroke engine that produces predictable, broadband power, making it the perfect choice for both beginner and intermediate riders.

As far as the chassis and suspension of the bike are concerned, the TT-R230 has a steel frame with a compact wheelbase and low seat height that combines accessibility to new or smaller riders while also being set up as having superb maneuverability and super-responsive handling. A 36mm front fork with 9.5" of wheel travel provides plush, confidence-inspiring control over rough terrain while the 11.6" of ground clearance should be enough to deal with almost any trail. Rounding out the set-up for the bike are 21" front aluminum wheels and 18" aluminum wheels with 220mm front disc brakes and 130mm rear drum brakes for powerful, confident stops.

Find out more about the Yamaha TT-R230 after the jump.

There’s a reason why the Honda CRF250R is considered one of the best bikes on the market. It’s got a pedigree unlike any other, as evidenced by its long history of racing success. It made its debut in 2004 and
took its first-ever AMA Supercross win early in the season. Two years after that, Honda Red Bull Racing’s Davi Millsaps rode it to the 2006 Supercross Lites East Championship. In 2008, GEICO Powersports Honda rookie Trey Canard rode all the way to a Supercross Lites East Championship, and in 2009 Ashley Fiolek notched her second consecutive AMA/WMA Women’s Motocross Championship. The common denominator with all those wins is that all the riders rode a CRF250R.

The CRF250R offers superb handling and excellent power that has been a tradition for Honda’s 250 class. For the 2012 model, Honda upped the ante, offering plenty of new goodies, including a new cylinder head and a 46mm throttle body that produces a broadened powerband featuring more low-end and midrange torque. In addition, the bike now carries an entirely new chassis that centers on a twin-spar aluminum frame with Honda’s Progressive Steering Damper (HPSD), a forged aluminum steering head, stronger downtubes and a simplified removable rear subframe. The bike also has an updated front and rear suspension settings, offering improved tracking and more precise handling. New foot pegs are also part of the package, as are new front axle collars that add rigidity to the front end, increasing the bike’s steering precision. On top of everything else, the CRF250R also comes with Dunlop’s premium MX51 tires cap off championship-caliber credentials that make the CRF250R the bike to beat in 2012.

Find out more about the Honda CRF250R’s specs after the jump.

Look up any of Honda ’s esteemed line of racing bikes and there’s a good chance that you’ll stumble across the CRF450R and the unique history it possesses despite having been in the market for the last couple of years.

Introduced as an all-new and lighter bike with fuel injection in 2009, the CRF450R earned overwhelming praise, winning in AMA racing and also winning a host of comparison tests and bike of the year awards.

The production version of the CRF450R has upheld the bike’s already legendary history and the 2012 model offers no hint of slowing down the momentum the bike has achieved in short time.

For the 2012 model, Honda added a slew of features to the bike, including stiffer fork outer tubes and front axle collars that bring a more solid feel to the front end, stiffer fork springs, revised suspension settings on the front and rear, plus a new shock linkage that produces improved tracking, more precise handling and added rider confidence over rough terrain. New foot pegs are also wider and longer, thus enhancing rider support while a new chain roller adds durability.

As for the powertrain, the 2012 CRF450R comes with a 449cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder four-stroke engine with a Programmed Fuel Injection (PGM-FI) system that controls fuel injection with remarkable precision, producing amazing drive right off the bottom while delivering a super-strong mid-range punch and an even stronger rush of top-end power.

Find out more about the Honda CRF450R’s specs after the jump.

Put the phrase “big fun in a small package” in Google and there’s a good chance that the Kawasaki KLX 250SF supermoto bike will pop up right in front of your eyes.

Based on the company’s critically-acclaimed KLX250S dual sport on/off-road bike, the 250SF dials it up with an aggressively style bodywork finishes that features a comfortable seat, a KLX-specific handlebar, an elaborate instrument panel, and a set of sticky street radials mounted on 17" wheels.

More than that, the KLX250SF also offers serious capabilities in a fun, easy-to-ride package, regardless of where the adventure takes it. The bike is powered by a 249cc four-stroke, liquid-cooled, DOHC, four-valve engine mated to a six-speed transmission, providing the kind of entry-level power that allows you to get introduced to the world of bikes. Compared to the KLX250S dual sport, the KLX250SF has also reduced wheel travel at both ends, placing the center of gravity lower for improved on-road handling and enhanced straight-line stability. At the same time, the suspension is still supple enough to soak up most road surface irregularities and offer a smooth ride. The KLX250SF comes with a fully-adjustable suspension that features a 16-way adjustable compression and rebound damping on both the 43mm inverted cartridge-style front fork and the UNI-TRAK rear suspension. A 300mm semi-floating petal disc with a two-piston hydraulic caliper is used as the front brake while the rear brake features a 240mm petal disc with single-piston hydraulic caliper.

Find out more about the Kawasaki KLX 250SF’s specs after the jump.


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