Triumph Daytona

Triumph Daytona

Posted on by Sulthoni  

The Triumph Daytona 675 is a fast motorcycle that was created with sporty performances in mind. The motorcycle is propelled by a fresh 675 cc, liquid-cooled, 12 valve, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder engine which features twin injectors per cylinder, titanium valves and a 14,400 red line.

The motorcycle’s engine generates a maximum power of 128 PS at 12500 rpm and 74 Nm of torque at 11900 rpm. All this power is kept under control by a six speed transmission with wet, multi-plate, slipper clutch. In terms of efficiency the new Triumph Daytona 657 offers an average a fuel consumption of 68.36mpg.

The motorcycle rides on cast aluminium alloy 5-Spoke 17 inch wheels which are shod in 120/70 ZR 17 front and 180/55 ZR 17 rear tires.

The Triumph Daytona 675 can be yours for no less than $ 11,599.

Hit the jump for more information on the Triumph Daytona 675 ABS.

Posted on by Sulthoni  

The R version of the Triumph Daytona 675 was specially developed for the track. The bike features a pretty aggressive character and is equipped with technologies developed using the experience gained by Triumph on the race track.

The motorcycle’s backbone is represented by a new frame with revised geometry which is paired with a new rigid aluminium swingarm. The Triumph Daytona 675R is also fitted with Öhlins suspensions, Brembo brakes, a quickshifter and a 4.6us Gallon fuel tank.

The motorcycle weighs 184 kg (wet) and is built around a 675cc, liquid-cooled, 12 valve, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder engine which delivers a maximum output of 128PS at 12500 rpm and 74NM of torque at 11900 rpm. The unit is mated to a six speed close ratio transmission which returns a fuel consumption of 68.36mpg.

As far as prices are concerned, the Triumph Daytona 675R can be yours for no less than $13,499.

Hit the jump for more information on the Triumph Daytona 675R.

Posted on by Sulthoni  

If you like the sporty character of the Daytona 675R, but you crave for a more relaxed riding experience then you should take a closer look at the standard Daytona 675.

The Daytona 675 comes with the same sporty design and fresh engine as the R version, but it has a more serene character which is oriented more toward comfort and les toward sport riding.

Compared to the previous versions, the 2013 Triumph Daytona 675 comes with re-designed frame which is significantly smaller, lighter and narrower than before. You also get a bigger airbox, new swingarm, lighter wheels and a few design modifications which help the motorcycle to “cut” the air easier.

Power comes from a liquid-cooled, 12 valve, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder engine with a capacity of 675cc. The unit delivers a maximum output of 126 bhp at 12500rpm and 74Nm of torque at 11900 rpm.

Hit the jump for more information on the Triumph Daytona 675.

Posted on by Sulthoni

The new 2013 Triumph Daytona is offered with many fresh features which enhance its racer character and make it ready for the track. Starting with the sleek design and finishing with the new triple motor, the bike has all it needs to give you an unforgiveable rush of adrenaline every time you get behind the handlebar.

Talking about the engine, the Triumph Daytona 675R is equipped with a completely new Liquid-cooled, 12 valve, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder unit with a capacity of 675cc. The cylinder block is made of solid aluminium with ceramic coated liners. Thanks to this feature, it was possible to raise the engine’s power from 125ps to 128ps and the torque from 73Nm to 75Nm. The rev limit was also increased to 14,400 rpm, with a larger bore and shorter stroke, while the peak power is now achieved at 12,600rpm.

Besides the new engine, the 2013 Triumph Daytona also comes with new frame geometry, Brembo breaks, a quick shifter, carbin trim, mass centralisation and race-derived suspension.

Hit the jump for more information on the 2013 Triumph Daytona 675R.

When you’re looking for a road and track-ready supersport machine that’s itching to be unleashed out into the world, there aren’t a lot of bikes in the market that can be considered better choices than the Daytona 675R.

Taking the already sublime Daytona 675 as its base, the 675R is the fruit of a successful collaboration between Triumph’s engineers and Swedish suspension specialists Öhlins. Together, the two companies have created a machine that can really be appreciated on the circuit by expert riders.

The carbon fiber-clad Daytona 675R is the picture of a sexy beast. It comes with a hugger, an exhaust heat shield, a front mudguard, a standard-fit quick shifter, and the Daytona 675’s comprehensive instrumentation, which includes a lap timer and programmable gear change lights. A range of official Triumph accessories are also available for the Daytona 675R, including an Arrow slip-on exhaust, race-style CNC machined levers, and single seat cowl.

Mechanically the Daytona 675R features the same powertrain as that of the standard Daytona 675 - a powerful 675cc liquid-cooled, 12 valve, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder engine - delivering an impressive 124 brake horsepower at 12,600rpm to go with a class-leading 53 lb/ft of torque. This setup makes it as engaging and flattering as any supersports bike on the market today.

As far as Öhlins is concerned, the leading authority in suspension systems contributed its revolutionary 43mm NIX30 forks, a system that’s usually only found on the racetrack or ultra-exotic Italian machines, and its MotoGP-developed TTX36 rear suspension unit. Radially mounted Monobloc calipers and a radial master cylinder from Italian specialist Brembo were specified to ensure the Daytona 675R also has class-leading stopping power.

Find out more about the Triumph Daytona 675R after the jump.

Triumph’s stable of motorcycles offers a list of some of the best bikes money can buy. Of these models, the one that attracts competitive riders is the Daytona 675 , a bike that not only poses impressive qualities on the road, but has also set a new standard in the ultra-competitive supersport class.

For the 2012 model, Triumph dressed up the Daytona 675 with a fresh new look, thanks to new graphics and finishes, as well as a choice between Phantom Black or Diablo Red color options. In addition, the bike also receives new “Daytona” decals and a Daytona 675R-style Jet Black bellypan, all complemented with new dark finishes to the footrest hangers and brake discs. The 2012 machine also features new clutch and generator covers, embossed with the Triumph logo, and made to look like the multi-purpose rocket that it is.

A full range of race-inspired Triumph accessories are available for the Daytona 675, including carbon parts, Arrow slip-on exhaust, quickshifter, and Öhlins rear suspension unit.

The latest-specification Daytona 675 carries a 675cc three-cylinder engine that delivers 124 brake horsepower at 12,600rpm to go with a class-leading 53 lb/ft of torque, making it one of the most impressive and versatile sportsbikes not just in Triumph’s stable, but in the entire market altogether. The engine itself is an integral part of the overall design, with the stacked gearbox allowing for a very compact powerplant that contributes to one of the lightest and most balanced supersport bikes on the market.

Finally, the Daytona 675 is well equipped in the chassis department, too, thanks in part to fully-adjustable 41mm inverted front forks and a rear mono shock unit, both of which benefit from sophisticated high- and low-speed damping control, allowing riders to set their Daytona 675s up for maximum accuracy while retaining a plush ride.

Find out more about the Triumph Daytona 675 after the jump.

Triumph brought at EICMA Show the 2011 Daytona 675 R. Starting with a standard Dayton 675, Triumph engineers worked in conjunction with Swedish suspension specialists Ohlins to create a machine that would really be appreciated on the circuit by expert riders.

Ohlins contributed its revolutionary 43 mm NIX30 forks usually only found on the racetrack and ultra-exotic Italian machines ans its MotoGT developed TTX36 rear suspension unit, while radially-mounted monoblock calipers and radial master cylinder from Italian specialist Brembo were specified to ensure Dayton 675R also has class-leading stopping power.

The Daytona 675R also gets: a standard lift quickshifter and a host of carbon fiber bodywork, including hugger, silencer heat shield ad front mudguard.

Mechanically the Daytona 675R is identical to the standard Daytona 675, delivering 125 HP at 12,600 rpm with a class-leading 72 NM of torque. The sports bike also get sporty new graphics that include a unique Triumph tank script and a special color scheme: Crystal White bodywork is contrasted with a race style black belly pan and distinctive red subframe.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 4

There’s little you can reproach to Triumph about the way their Daytona 675 looks, but ways to make it better are continuously found both by tuners and owners around the world. What we’ve recently came across is actually a supposition regarding to weather Audi-like LED headlamps further enhance the aggressive note of middleweight British sports bike.

We think this looks quite striking and might catch on to the motorcycle industry as well, but in the end it’s all up to the Hinckley-based company to make their move as result of feedback from fans.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

Triumph’s 2010 model range has two new Special Edition models, the Daytona 675 SE and Thunderbird SE.

The British manufacturer’s high spec middleweight supersport bike, the Daytona 675 SE stands out both from the standard model and from the previous SE model thanks to new flank graphics, white striped wheel, race-inspired brake and clutch levers and a host of carbon parts from Triumph’s accessories catalogue. This bike will hit dealerships on March 1st and have a price tag of $12,700.

In what the 2010 Triumph Thunderbird SE is concerned, it comes with standard ABS and gets the all-new Carnival Red color. Various genuine Triumph accessories are available for this model too. Expect to find the 2010 Thunderbird SE in dealerships from early March with an MSRP of $18,900.

Apart from the above mentioned, both bikes are technically unchanged from their standard siblings.

Source: visordown
Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

British engineering and refinement standards have been raised with the introduction of the latest Daytona 675! Triumph took the decision to slightly refine their supersports model and they managed well with the self-imposed challenge. Although power was not increased, the Daytona has probably the best chassis in the middleweight sports class, making it an award-winning machine.


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