Tuners

Tuners

Posted on by Maxx Biker 2

French motorcycle accessories producer S2 Concept has created an aftermarket GT kit for the Suzuki Gladius. This addresses to those willing to enhance the touring capabilities of the Japanese naked bike by significantly improving wind protection.

Characterized by aggressive design blending perfectly in with that of the Gladius, the kit is composed mainly from a half-fairing and windscreen, which are mounted using a 3-piece aluminum mount, but you also get a cooler aluminum dash to fit the sport-touring scenario.

S2 also produces other aftermarket Gladius parts such as engine spoiler, undertail, plate holder, screens of various sizes, LED stoplights and integrated signal lights as well as rear fender and many others.

Source: motoflash
Posted on by Maxx Biker 4

They say you need to be a certain kind of biker in order to ride a trike and it is not hard to recognize the type as the biking crowd passes along, so hearing about a guy having turned a 2001 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-12R into a trike raises a few question marks regarding to what kind of rider would do that and why. A very special kind of rider let me tell you and also one who wants to have fun and feel a little safer on two wheels.

Simeon Hill is a brit who’s 155mph Kawi trike featuring a custom-built frame, a push-button gearshift system, Akrapovic exhaust, modified axle and differential from a Ford Sierra made it to Trike magazine. Sure, the 17-inch rear wheels with 235 x 50 tires also had much to do with the achievement, but mostly with what our man built it for. So let’s see what Hill has to say: ‘I built this trike to handle. I have turned a few heads and surprised many sportsbike riders on twisty Yorkshire and Lincolnshire roads. It’s taken me on local jaunts, weekend trips and longer trips around Europe, not only keeping up with my friends’ sportsbikes but also giving them a good run for their money.’

Posted on by Maxx Biker 2

The Yamaha R1 Rossi Edition is a one-off custom motorcycle that will go up for charity auction right after its customizers “give it wide exposure.” The bike was created by a team led by Don Emde, 1972 Daytona 200 winner and founder of US based fundraiser Friends of Riders for Health, to raise money for the official MotoGP charity.

It was an expensive project achieved using aftermarket parts supplied by different manufacturers such as Rolands Sands (the aluminum wheels), Akrapovic (the Evolution exhaust system) and Ohlins (the FGRT808 front suspension and TTX rear).

Valentino Rossi’s AGV ‘Five Continents’ graphics done by Pole Position Racing Service in Italy make it a “Rossi bike” and all these changes bring it much closer to the race track rather than the street but, just for the record, The Doctor’s R1 is also street legal.

Although the bidding day hasn’t been announced yet, Emde told MCN: “One thing I want to have in place would be the ability for anyone to bid on the machine, via online or some off-site methods. That would be something we would announce on the website, www.friendsofriders.org

Source: MCN
Posted on by Maxx Biker 1

The Moto Guzzi V11 was originally built as a veritable naked with café racer styling cues, but GHEZZI – BRIAN has recently presented the streetfighter version of the Italian bike and we totally dig it. This is actually a demo bike for the Furia Replica kit that stands behind the striking transformation, but the upgrades go way further than what meets the eye as the kit includes new pistons, rods, camshaft and exhaust pipes, all bringing the Italian V-twin to a more than decent 100bhp.

The Furia Replica kit is easy to fit on any Moto Guzzi V11, but at $5,442 (€4,000), you really have to like it in order to buy it and for those expecting more details, check out the list of parts that compose the kit after the jump.

Source: visordown
Posted on by Maxx Biker 2

This Honda CB750 café racer was created by Japanese custom builder Whitehouse together with Japanese retailer Motorimoda and it is actually called CB750 Café Type Motorimoda. What first meets the eye is the 1970s racing styling achieved with the use of modern materials such as carbon fiber, from which several parts have been made. These, together with the aluminum gas tank lighten this custom CB750 with 33 lbs (15 kg).

Underneath the aerodynamic fairing sits an original carbureted, air-cooled, four-cylinder engine that delivers 20hp more than the original production version after being tuned and getting a new exhaust.

So, with less weight, more power and much better looks, this café racer qualifies for the very special price of $29,290.

Source: MCN
Posted on by Maxx Biker 2

While Kawasaki discontinued their 1990s Zephyr 1100, the bike remains popular among those with an affinity for large-displacement nakeds and it even got a 2010 makeover from the Japanese tuner Moriwaki. The bike looks gorgeous with the dark blue/yellow color scheme, but this is one of those cases when the “more than meets the eye” part is what really makes all the difference.

This thing is powered by a big bore 1258cc inline-four engine breathing out through a hand made exhaust system and developing a decent 110bhp. While bringing in a new clutch and suspension, Moriwaki also fitted their latest idea for a Kawi Zephyr with a computer designed, aluminum alloy swingarm in order to stiffen up the rear end as well as make possible the use of a 180 section rear wheel and tire.

Is it just us or this is the best looking Kawasaki Zephyr around?

Source: MCN
Posted on by Maxx Biker

You can’t entirely say what’s not perfect with a bike until it ends up in the hands of tuning specialists and they strengthen its weak points in the very often successful attempt of making the best better. This is exactly the case of the Storz XR1200 based on Harley’s flat-track style road bike.

Steve Storz, founder and boss of Storz Performance, who worked at this project, told MCN: “The XR1200 is decent bike in its stock form, but in my opinion it needs help in two areas: suspension and overall weight."

So the H-D specialist concentrated on upgrading the bike using lighter parts mainly on the chassis and bodywork sides. The suspension, wheels, brakes, exhaust, handlebars and seat unit are anything but standard parts as the bike gets Storz/Ceriani Inverted fork, YSS piggyback shocks, wire spoke wheels with alloy rims and billet hubs, chain drive conversion kit and solo seat tail section, just to mention some of its most important tuning features. The bike also features lowered clip-ons handlebars and a billet alloy footrest and gearlever kit. Overall weight was reduced by approximately 33 lbs (14.9kg), so I guess this is a truly accomplished mission.

What we like most about the Storz Performance XR1200 is the fact that without any engine upgrade or mod, it really turns into a much greater overall performer.

Source: MCN
Posted on by Maxx Biker

Apart from providing motorcycle gear for speed junkies, Icon also like to get their hands dirty from time to time while customizing, obviously, Japanese motorcycles. One of their latest creations is actually called the Kawazuki, originally a 1979 Kawasaki KZ1000 with an ordinary destiny, but which ended up with a modified frame (mounts for rearsets included), a Suzuki SV1000 monoshock and front end as well as with a ’92 GSX-R750 swingarm and rear wheel.

The original engine was fitted with a 1075cc Wiseco big bore kit so that this classic would keep up with modern bikes, but it is a pleasure just to look at it.

Posted on by Maxx Biker 2

When you’re not satisfied with what a motorcycle company is selling to you, but you’re such a big fan and cannot head in the opposite direction, you start taking things into your own hands and out of your pockets. This is exactly what Tony Hartfield did when noticing that the Triumph Street Triple R isn’t quite the performance machine he was expecting when he bought it. So he then headed towards a new 2009 Triumph Daytona 675 (Street Triple R’s original source of inspiration) and built his own idea of a high-performance naked.

Tony retained the 126bhp Daytona 675 motor, which has around 20hp more than the Street Triple, but modified the Daytona chassis in order to fit it with Speed Triple handlebars as well as with Street Triple indicators and headlights. Other upgrades include Giles rear sets, Pazzo levers and Galfer wavey discs front and rear.

Having completed the project, Tony told MCN: "I reckon what I have is what the Triple R should have been." And he may very well be right.

Source: MCN
Posted on by Maxx Biker

Although Buell doesn’t build bikes any more, their 1125R half-faired superbike remains a machine with great tuning potential and we’ve seen some good ones ever since HD decided to kill Buell last year, but none is as good as the Magpul Ronin Buell 1125R with girder suspension.

Looking at it, it’s easy to think this bike actually suffered no modifications whatsoever as the girder front end looks similar to the original frame and swingarm, but it completely changes the whole look of the bike. There’s actually much more to it than just the girder suspension, but little information is available and we hear we can’t really hope for a production version as this is pretty much a demonstration of power right here and not quite THE way to go big on the highly competitive market of custom motorcycles.


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