F1 teams to begin using 4-cylinder twin-turbo engines in 2013

Changes in Formula One occur just about as often as Charles Barkley chows down on cheeseburgers, so it really didn’t come as a surprise that F1 is on the verge of having a new engine formula that would run for six years starting in 2013.

According to Spanish newspaper El Mundo Deportivo, an agreement in principle has been reached to begin using - effective in 2013 - a four-cylinder, 1.5 liter engine that comes with twin-turbo, direct injection, and the KERS system.

In an interview with Autocar magazine at the Beijing Motor Show , Ferrari CEO Amedeo Felisa said that F1 should take the necessary steps to begin using engines that could also be translated to road-driving conditions. "If F1 has to develop something helpful for real (road) driving conditions, then the best solution is for an engine that is turbocharged and GDI (gasoline direct injection)," he said.

Continued after the jump

Norbert Haug of Mercedes echoed Felisa’s sentiments, despite also pointing out that F1 should remain invested in taking advantage of high technology in developing their race cars. "Smaller engines should be used for consumption and emissions," he said. "But you still need to look at the whole picture. If you fly from Europe to Japan on a 747, you would use more fuel than an entire F1 season."

For now, further development of the 2.4-liter V8 engines that are used today in F1 cars have been ’frozen’, at least until powerful engines that are more fuel-efficient and emit less pollution - and likewise affordable to the smaller teams - become available.


7 comments:

Ok I just imagine that I’m in the true battle , it is Bugatti Veyron Vs Formula 1 car.
No doubt the Bugatti Veyron is the fastest , and most powerful car , but will it win the battle

what? So shocking. Most of the cars nowadays is using the 4-cylinder twin turbo engines. But why on earth does the F1 teams use this technology just this coming 2013?

That’s great, it’s about time that 4-cylinder engines get noticed.

Impressive engine, the 4 cylinder restriction places many obstacles in front of the engineers who must now design an engine that keeps piston speeds down to a level that will keep the engine from destroying itself, a much easier proposition on a V6 or V8 engine that can use a much shorter stroke crankshaft and smaller, lighter pistons to achieve the required displacement.

Well, I guess they have to lessen the eNgine’s weight and consumption. That’s they’ve replace it with v4 engines.

How about the specs? Max Speed, Torque and HP? and also the amount?.

Nascar gets to keep their V8s. I fail to see why F1 has to switch to turboed four cylinders engines.

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