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Formula One Videos

Some of us are content with high-def video games, but for a team with an exponentially bigger budget like Red Bull, video games are about as high-tech as a wooden bicycle. No, these guys don’t roll like that.

What they have are race simulators and pretty awesome ones at that. On the lead-up to the Barcelona Grand Prix, team driver Mark Webber got to sit behind one of the mock RB25 race simulators to try to get acclimated with the circuit before the race this Sunday. That’s the kind of technology that’s pretty prevalent in Formula One and that you won’t be able to find in any other racing series in the world.

This is actually the second video brought to us by Red Bull. A little over a week ago we posted the video of Sebastien Vettel as he made his practice runs on the simulator.

As for the rest of us, being allowed to drive this simulator is completely out of the question so we’ll have to settle for just watching the video.

If you thought that steering wheels today, with all the buttons and high-tech gadgetry attached to it, are complicated, you obviously have never been introduced to the steering wheel of a Formula One car, which is so chalk-full of buttons and switches you’d think it looks more like a controller for the Xbox 360.

In this video created by Ferrari , Giuliano Salvi, a performance engineer for the no.7 Ferrari F1 car, aka Felipe Massa’s car, gives us a detailed run-down of the steering wheel that makes the no.7 car run. From the gear switches to the plethora of knobs and buttons, it’s hard enough to remember which buttons do what to the car, let alone having to do it at such high speeds that certain decisions on what button to press or what knob to turn usually comes with a window of only a few seconds, maybe less.

And you know what’s the most amazing part about that steering wheel is? According to Silva, this new steering wheel version has already been stripped down compared to last year’s model. With so many things going on in and around the car during an F1 race, it’s amazing how these guys can keep their concentrations zoned in on the race, especially with all the complexities those steering wheels come in.

Source: Ferrari
Posted on by George Grand
Ernesto’s car became airborne, hit the safety barrier, came apart, and landed on the other side. According to FIA, it took 15 minutes to extract him from the car, but the good news is that he suffered only minor contusions.Hard to say i we watch the video.

Ernesto’s car became airborne, hit the safety barrier, came apart, and landed on the other side. According to FIA, it took 15 minutes to extract him from the car, but the good news is that he suffered only minor contusions.Hard to say i we watch the video.


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