You’re not going to find another performance car with the same kind of credentials as the Corvette C8 at the price it’s offered

The all-new 2020 Chevrolet Corvette C8 is arguably one of the most important models in the nameplate’s entire history. We all know that it’s the first-ever mid-engine Corvette, and while that distinction is special enough on its own, there’re more to it than that, too. The base version of the Corvette C8 packs an equally new 6.2-liter naturally aspirated V-8 engine that produces 495 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque. The numbers don’t really scream “supercar!” in the way other models on this list do, but this is one of those times when brochure numbers are a bit misleading.

The ‘Vette C8’s new LT2 engine is a proper race-bred engine built specifically for this iteration of the Corvette. It’s the fastest revving V-8 engine that General Motors has and, despite the impressive output, the LT2 V-8 also scores top marks in fuel efficiency. The Corvette C8’s Tremec-sourced eight-speed dual-clutch transmission was also made specifically for the Corvette C8, checking all the boxes for efficiency along the way. Line those up together and the Corvette C8’s ability to sprint from 0 to 60 mph in less than three seconds and hit a top speed that should reach 190-plus mph is beyond impressive, especially when you consider that this model costs less than $60,000. Simply put, there’s no other car in the market today that can give you that kind of bang for the buck that’s required to buy one. Yes, that includes the supercars on this list.

Lamborghini Aventador S- $417,650

2018 Lamborghini Aventador S
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In any other time, comparing a Lamborghini Aventador S with a Chevrolet Corvette is a pure form of blasphemy.

The Corvette is a great sports car, but it’s nowhere near the league, status, and overall auto of an Italian supercar with the lineage of the Aventador.

The numbers back it up, too. The Aventador S is powered by a monstrous 6.5-liter naturally aspirated V-12 engine that produces 729 horsepower and 507 pound-feet of torque. That kind of power is par for the course in the supercar segment, but the Aventador S also makes good use of it, thanks to its ability to sprint from 0 to 60 mph in 2.9 seconds and hit a top speed of 217 mph.

Performance numbers aside, the interior specification of the Aventador S is virtually limitless, as long as you have enough money to spend for Lamborghini’s Ad Personam customization program. Don’t forget, too, all the premium materials that went into the Italian supercar’s construction. Very few automakers can rival Lamborghini when it comes to developing and building cars using only the finest, most premium, and most technologically advanced materials in the world. It’s what makes Lamborghini the automaker that is. And yet, if we’re talking about it strictly from a performance perspective, would you be able to justify buying a car worth more than $400,000 when there’s another one that can come close to what it’s capable of a price of under $60,000?

2018 Lamborghini Aventador S High Resolution Exterior
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LAMBORGHINI AVENTADOR S SPECIFICATIONS
Engine size and layout: 6.5-liter V-12 engine; mid-engine
Transmission: seven-speed automatic transmission
Horsepower: 729 horsepower
Torque: 507 pound-feet of torque
Curb Weight: 1,575 kg (3,472 lb)
Power-to-Weight Ratio: 0.46 horsepower/kilo
0-60 MPH: 2.9 seconds
0-120 MPH: 8.6 seconds
Top Speed: 217 mph
Price: $417,650

Read our full review on the Lamborghini Aventador S

Aston Martin DBS Superleggera - $304,995

2019 Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Exterior
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When Aston Martin decided to get serious about upping its supercar game, the DBS Superleggera served as a preview of sorts on what the British automaker was capable of.

The juiced-up DB11 is powered by a 5.2-liter twin-turbocharged V-12 engine that produces 715 horsepower and 664 pound-feet of torque.

It only takes 3.2 seconds for the DBS Superleggera to go from 0 to 60 mph and it can hit a top speed in excess of 213 mph. The power figures and the corresponding performance numbers fall within the realm of what a supercar is capable of. But like every exotic, there’s more to the DBS Superleggera than gaudy numbers.

Since it’s based on the DB11, the DBS Superleggera features the same aluminum architecture as the car that it can trace its roots from. The big difference is that the DBS Superleggera comes with carbon fiber body panels that help shed 160 pounds (72 kg) of weight compared to the DB11. It still tips the scales at just shy of 1,700 kilos, but the relatively lighter weight makes a big difference in the supercar’s performance capabilities. Compare the DBS Superleggera to the Lamborghini Aventador S, and you can make a case for the Aston Martin in part because of the value it presents. But the tables are turned when you compare the DBS Superleggera to the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette C8. All of a sudden, it’s the Aston Martin that’s priced way more than the Corvette C8, which, by the way, is expected to have a faster acceleration time than the DBS Superleggera at one-fifth of the cost of the Corvette.

2019 Aston Martin DBS Superleggera Exterior
- image 785037
ASTON MARTIN DBS SUPERLEGGERA SPECIFICATIONS
Engine size and layout: 5.2-liter V-12 engine; front-engine
Transmission: eight-speed automatic transmission
Horsepower: 715 horsepower
Torque: 664 pound-feet of torque
Curb Weight: 1,693 kg (3,732 pounds)
Power-to-Weight Ratio: 0.42 horsepower/kilo
0-60 MPH: 3.2 seconds
0-120 MPH: 9.5 seconds
Top Speed: 213 mph
Price: $304,995

Read our full review on the Aston Martin DBS Superleggera

Ferrari 488 - $256,550

2010 Ferrari 458 Italia
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When you buy a Ferrari, you know that you’re going to have to spend a lot of money on it, and by a lot of money, I mean around $250,000. That’s the price of a Ferrari 488 GTB, of which there are still some available even though its replacement, the Ferrari F8 Tributo already made its début earlier this year at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show.

The 488 GTB checks all the boxes you’d want in a Ferrari.

It’s styled like a chiseled Italian exotic. It boasts the kind of craftsmanship you can only expect from an automaker like Ferrari. It weighs just 1,475 kilos, making it one of the lightest cars in this list. It’s also powered by a scintillating 3.9-liter turbocharged V-8 engine that produces a stout 661 horsepower and 561 pound-feet of torque.

Those output numbers help the Ferrari sprint from 0 to 60 mph in 2.8 seconds on its way to a top speed of 205 mph. Everything about the 488 GTB is awesome, and if you have enough to afford one, buying a model for a little over $250,000 is a relative bargain compared to a model like the Aston Martin DBS Superleggera. But is it a better option than the Chevrolet Corvette C8? After all, one model is already on its way out, replaced by a model — the F8 Tributo — that’s better in every measurable way. As for the Corvette C8? Let’s just say it’s newer than the Ferrari that’s replacing the 488 GTB.

2016 Ferrari 488 GTB High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
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FERRARI 488 SPECIFICATIONS
Engine size and layout: 3.9-liter V-8 engine; mid-engine
Transmission: seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission
Horsepower: 661 horsepower
Torque: 561 pound-feet of torque
Curb Weight: 1,475 kilos (3,252 pounds)
Power-to-Weight Ratio: 0.45 horsepower/kilo
0-60 MPH: 2.8 seconds
0-120 MPH: 8.2 seconds
Top Speed: 205 mph
Price: $256,550

Read our full review on the Ferrari 488

Bentley Continental GT W12 - $225,000

2018 Bentley Continental GT High Resolution Exterior
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The phrase “value for money” becomes relative when you’re talking about the Bentley Continental GT. On the one hand, buying a Continental GT still gives you a car that can lay the smackdown on any weasel that gets in its way.

The Continental’s 6.0-liter W-12 engine packs 626 horsepower and 664 pound-feet of torque. That’s power that even the Corvette C8 can’t match.

The Continental GT is also one of the most luxurious cars in the world, a by-product of having that “flying B” badge sitting in the front hood. On the other hand, Bentley’s are also heavy. With its curb weight of 2,294 kilos — 4,947 pounds — the Continental GT is, by far, the heaviest car in this list. The extra baggage it’s carrying compromises its performance ability, and the numbers show out. The Continental GT can sprint from 0 to 60 mph in 3.7 seconds and hit a top speed of 207 mph.

Those figures are impressive for a car of its size, but it’s still not enough to outpace the Corvette C8. Indeed, the new Chevy sports car can’t match fine leather and wood veneers with the Corvette C8. Then again, you’re not buying a Corvette C8 because of the materials it has in the interior. If anything, a high-quality cabin is more of a complement to what the Vette C8 can do on the road. If that’s the metric you’re looking at, consider this: you can buy roughly around four entry-level Corvette C8s for the price of one Bentley Continental GT.

2018 Bentley Continental GT High Resolution Exterior
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BENTLEY CONTINENTAL GT W12 SPECIFICATIONS
Engine size and layout: 6.0-liter W-12 engine; front-engine
Transmission: eight-speed automatic transmission
Horsepower: 626 horsepower
Torque: 664 pound-feet of torque
Curb Weight: 2,294 kilos (4,947 pounds)
Power-to-Weight Ratio: 0.28 horsepower/kilo
0-60 MPH: 3.7 seconds
0-120 MPH: 12.4 seconds
Top Speed: 207 mph
Price: $225,000

Read our full review on the Bentley Continental GT W12

Ferrari Portofino - $215,000

2018 Ferrari Portofino High Resolution Exterior
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The Ferrari Portofino has one of the best names of any supercar in the market today. Its configuration as a 2+2 hardtop convertible also means that it’s more of a direct competitor to the upcoming Corvette C8 Convertible. But since Chevrolet hasn’t announced the Corvette C8’s release, its coupé counterpart will have to hold court for the time being.

Line the Portofino and the Corvette C8 next to each other, and you’ll actually see many similarities between the two models, specifically as it relates to how they look.

From the aggressive front section to the cuts in the side panels to the muscular rear fenders, the Portofino and the Corvette C8 evoke similar emotional responses from all of us.

Of course, it helps that the Portofino’s 3.9-liter twin-turbocharged V-8 engine produces 591 horsepower and 561 pound-feet of torque. That’s one of its biggest selling points, as big at least as the fact that it’s a Ferrari. The Corvette C8’s own V-8 engine doesn’t produce as much power — 490 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque — but the discrepancy between the two isn’t as big as you’d expect it to be. But thanks to all the new technologies that Chevrolet managed to inject into the Corvette C8’s internals, the latter is expected to be faster than the Portofino in a sprint-to-60-mph time by around 0.3 seconds. Now, line the Portofino and the Corvette C8 next to each other again and ask yourself this question: Looks notwithstanding, which one has the better value? The $215,000 Italian supercar or its $60,000 American counterpart. Numbers don’t lie, folks, specifically when it comes to Benjamins.

2018 Ferrari Portofino High Resolution Exterior
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FERRARI PORTOFINO SPECIFICATIONS
Engine size and layout: 3.9-liter V-8 engine; front-engine
Transmission: seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission
Horsepower: 591 horsepower
Torque: 561 pound-feet of torque
Curb Weight: 1,475 kilos (3,252 pounds)
Power-to-Weight Ratio: 0.35 horsepower/kilo
0-60 MPH: 3.3 seconds
0-120 MPH: 9.6 seconds
Top Speed: 199 mph
Price: $215,000

Read our full review on the Ferrari Portofino

McLaren GT - $210,000

10 Cars That Prove that the 2020 Chevy C8 Corvette is a Better Value For Your Money
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The McLaren GT and the Chevrolet Corvette C8 share one thing in common: they both represent firsts for their respective automakers.

We already know what the Corvette C8 means for Chevrolet, but the McLaren GT is special for McLaren, too, in large part because it’s the British automaker’s first-ever dedicated grand tourer. Beyond that, the GT and the Corvette C8 have very little in common other than that they’re both aesthetically pleasing to the eyes. The GT has all sorts of advantages over the Corvette C8.

There’s more space in the more well-appointed interior. It’s more powerful, too, thanks to a 4.0-liter twin-turbocharged V-8 engine that produces 612 horsepower and 465 pound-feet of torque. Combine that with the GT’s curb weight — 1,530 kilos — and the GT boasts one of the highest power-to-weight ratios of all the models in this list. The Corvette C8, however, boasts a power-to-weight ratio of just 0.32/kilo, and while it does have more torque than the GT, the McLaren’s power advantage is significant. This is probably the toughest car to argue against as far as value is concerned, but at the end of the day, there’s still a $150,000 price gap between the GT and the Corvette C8’s. That’s more significant than the difference in power between the two models.

2020 McLaren GT
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MCLAREN GT SPECIFICATIONS
Engine size and layout: 4.0-liter V-8 engine; mid-engine
Transmission: seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission
Horsepower: 612 horsepower
Torque: 465 pound-feet of torque
Curb Weight: 1,530 kilos (3,373 pounds)
Power-to-Weight Ratio: 0.4 horsepower/kilo
0-60 MPH: 3.3 seconds
0-120 MPH: 9.1 seconds
Top Speed: 203 mph
Price: $210,000

Read our full review on the McLaren GT

Lamborghini Huracan RWD - $199,800

2016 Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 High Resolution Exterior
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When it comes to value for money, the rear-wheel-drive version of the rear-wheel-drive Lamborghini Huracan is hard to beat.

It carries the Lamborghini mantle proudly in a package that includes a 5.2-liter V-10 engine that produces 580 horsepower and 398 pound-feet of torque. Impressive figures, sure, but forget about the numbers for a second and focus on what makes the RWD Huracan special. Simply put, it’s a Lamborghini that’s meant to be wild around the edges. It’s built for fun, and with the amount of oversteer you get from it, you’re going to be challenged in keeping this Huracan in check.

Fortunately, Lamborghini isn’t leaving you out on an island with the RWD Huracan. There’s enough refinement in the supercar’s suspension that should ease whatever concerns you may have about its handling. The RWD is the car you bring to the track to have some fun, though you can say the same thing about the Chevrolet Corvette C8. The American sensation actually boasts more torque than its Italian counterpart, and that manifests itself in how fast the ‘Vette C8 can accelerate from a standstill position. And it’s not like the Corvette C8 is a prude compared to the RWD Huracan. On the contrary, it has the makings of a car that’s as much fun to drive on the roads as it is on the track. And the best part? You’re only paying a third of the amount it’s going to take to buy a $199,800 RWD Huracan.

2016 Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 High Resolution Exterior
- image 655907
LAMBORGHINI HURACAN RWD SPECIFICATIONS
Engine size and layout: 5.2-liter V-10 engine; mid-engine
Transmission: seven-speed automatic transmission
Horsepower: 580 horsepower
Torque: 398 pound-feet of torque
Curb Weight: 1,389 kilos (3,062 pounds)
Power-to-Weight Ratio: 0.38 horsepower/kilo
0-60 MPH: 3.2 seconds
0-120 MPH: 10.1 seconds
Top Speed: 199 mph
Price: $199,800

Read our full review on the Lamborghini Huracan RWD

Porsche 911 GT3 RS - $188,550

2018 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Exterior Wallpaper quality
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As much as I love the Porsche 911 GT3 RS — it is the most hardcore of all hardcore Porsche 911s — it’s hard to make a case for this model when you compare it to one that’s a third of its price tag. But that isn’t meant to dissuade you from this engineering achievement.

At its core, the 911 GT3 RS is the perfect performance machine for your race track exploits.

It’s built for generating fast lap times and impressive performance numbers at the test track, or at least that’s what it does when it’s running full tilt. On the road, the 911 GT3 RS is surprisingly well-compromised for a car that produces 513 horsepower and 347 pound-feet of torque.

That’s good enough to allow the sports car to sprint from 0 to 60 mph in just 3.6 seconds on its way to a top speed of 194 mph. But if power is what you’re after, there’s no going around it, either. The Chevrolet Corvette C8 has more of it on tap: 490 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque from a 6.2-liter naturally aspirated V-8 engine. It’s also faster to 60 mph than the Porsche and, if speculation is to be believed, it has a higher top speed than the 194-mph max of the 911 GT3 RS. And it’s not like the Corvette C8 is a chump on a race track, too. Chevrolet built and developed it to adapt to whatever environment it’s in, be in out in the world or within the confines of a course. If you have money to spend, the Porsche 911 GT3 RS should be on top of your wishlist. But if money’s an issue, the Corvette C8 provides similar kinds of thrills at a far more affordable cost.

2018 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 769927
PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS SPECIFICATIONS
Engine size and layout: 4.0-liter boxer-six engine; mid-engine
Transmission: seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission
Horsepower: 513 horsepower
Torque: 347 pound-feet of torque
Curb Weight: 1,430 kilos (3,153 pounds)
Power-to-Weight Ratio: 0.36 horsepower/kilo
0-60 MPH: 3.6 seconds
0-120 MPH: 10.3 seconds
Top Speed: 194 mph
Price: $188,550

Read our full review on the Porsche 911 GT3 RS

Audi R8 V10 Coupe - $169,900

10 Cars That Prove that the 2020 Chevy C8 Corvette is a Better Value For Your Money Exterior
- image 801657

The Audi R8 has a lot of what you want from a supercar. It looks like one, and it performs like one. The latter is largely due to Audi’s trusty 5.2-liter V-10 engine, which has supplied power for the automaker’s resident supercar seemingly from the beginning of its life a decade ago. But just because the V-10 has become synonymous with the R8, that doesn’t mean it hasn’t kept up with the times.

In its current state, the engine produces 562 horsepower and 406 pound-feet of torque, good enough to help the R8 sprint from 0 to 60 mph in just 3.3 seconds before capping out at 201 mph.

These are all impressive numbers in supercar-speak, but it does come at a cost of $169,900. Meanwhile, the all-new Chevrolet Corvette C8’s equally new 6.2-liter V-8 LT2 engine packs 490 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque. Chevrolet hasn’t released performance specs, but everyone seems to hint that the Vette C8 can accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in under three seconds to go with a top speed approaching 200 mph. Both models can lay claim to boasting superior tech and safety features, and no one’s going to argue either way. But there is something to be said for the Corvette C8 keeping pace with everything the R8 has to offer without the financial damage that comes with buying the German supercar.

2019 Audi R8 Exterior
- image 801656
AUDI R8 V10 COUPE SPECIFICATIONS
Engine size and layout: 5.2-liter V-10 engine; mid-engine
Transmission: seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission
Horsepower: 562 horsepower
Torque: 406 pound-feet of torque
Curb Weight: 1,660 kilos (3,660 pounds)
Power-to-Weight Ratio: 0.34 horsepower/kilo
0-60 MPH: 3.3 seconds
0-120 MPH: 10.5 seconds
Top Speed: 201 mph
Price: $169,900

Read our full review on the Audi R8 V10 Coupe

Mercedes-AMG GT R Coupe - $159,350

2018 Mercedes-AMG GT R High Resolution Exterior
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The last car on this list is one of the few ones I’ve gotten a chance to drive. Folks, the Mercedes-AMG GT R is as good as advertised. It’s not the most spacious car to drive in, but seeing I’m not vertically predisposed, it wasn’t too much of a problem for me. The comfort is compounded, too, by the abundance of quality materials that wrap you up in a warm embrace. The fine leather, Alcantara, and carbon fiber? All top-class, folks. What I like most about the AMG GT R, though, is that it doesn’t hide from what it is: a track car. The suspension was a bit harsh, and the vibration can rattle those who aren’t used to driving a car as powerful as this one. But that comes with the territory of driving the AMG GT R. You’re going to need reps driving in tracks before you can tame the GT R.

I don’t know how the Chevrolet Corvette C8 drives, but I am excited about what it has to offer, particularly when you put it in a similar environment.

The AMG GT R has advantages in the output department — the trusted AMG 4.0-liter V-8 engine produces 577 horsepower and 516 pound-feet of torque — but the car isn’t as light on its feet as you’d like it to be. Perhaps that’s why, in addition to being heavier than the Corvette C8, the AMG GT R isn’t as fast to 60 mph than the all-new Vette. It also costs 2.5 times the Corvette C8. That’s a big deal, too.

2018 Mercedes-AMG GT R High Resolution Exterior
- image 680713
MERCEDES-AMG GT R COUPE SPECIFICATIONS
Engine size and layout: 4.0-liter V-8 engine; mid-engine
Transmission: seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission
Horsepower: 577 horsepower
Torque: 516 pound-feet of torque
Curb Weight: 1,625 kilos (3,582 pounds)
Power-to-Weight Ratio: 0.34 horsepower/kilo
0-60 MPH: 3.5 seconds
0-120 MPH: 10.6 seconds
Top Speed: 197 mph
Price: $159,530

Read our full review on the Mercedes-AMG GT R Coupe

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