Corbellati – it’s not a brand you’re probably familiar with, but it is known to artists, art enthusiasts, and jewel collectors. History aside, the family brand has decided to branch out into the automotive world, and its first attempt is a big one. I’m talking about, of course, the Corbellati Missile – a car that’s billed with the high expectation of being the world’s fastest car, Buggati, Koenigsegg, and Hennessey be damned. Little about the car is known at this point, but it does sport a purely Italian design and promises 1,800 horsepower and a top speed that breaches the 310-mph range. The power credentials are certainly there, but whether or not it will live up to the hype remains to be seen.
Skepticism aside, the made its debut at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show, so let’s take a closer look!

  • 2018 Corbellati Missile
  • Year:
    2018
  • Engine:
    V8
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    1800
  • Displacement:
    9.0 L
  • 0-60 time:
    2 sec. (Est.)
  • Top Speed:
    310 mph
  • Price:
  • car segment:
  • size:
  • Purpose:
  • body style:

Corbellati Missile Exterior

2018 Corbellati Missile Exterior
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It’s pretty clear that this baby was born and raised in the heartland for fine automobiles, the home of brands like Ferrari, Maserati, Lamborghini, and Alfa Romeo.

At this point, almost nothing is certain about this Italian-bred hypercar outside of the seemly outrageous claims of power and speed. We do, however, have a full view of this monster of a car.

It’s pretty clear that this baby was born and raised in the heartland for fine automobiles, the home of brands like Ferrari, Maserati, Lamborghini, and Alfa Romeo. Up front, the car reminds wholeheartedly of the Ferrari 250. It has a similar nose setup with that wide but thin air inlet positioned right in the middle of near-vertical headlamps that are integrated into the tall, but extra long front fenders. To be more specific, it looks like someone took the front end of a Ferrari 250 and stretched it out a bit.

The side profile is defined by a simple, wavy ambiance that carries along from the nose all of the way to the rear haunches where things flatten out, on an incline, to provide the sweet spot for the engines air-intake passage. The muscular rear quarters match the front well, keeping things even from front to rear, while the door managers to sit right in the middle, only identifiable because of the necessary gaps required. The windshield and door glass come together, almost as one, to create a huge, 180-degree field of vision – a feature that also accents the slenderness of the greenhouse and sheer width of the body below the waistline.

2018 Corbellati Missile Exterior
- image 773525
The bubble-butt look is strong here, with the rear haunches being much wider than the front fenders.

Corbellati took a very interesting approach to the rear of this thing. The bubble-butt look is strong here, with the rear haunches being much wider than the front fenders. Of course, you can imagine that with 1800 ponies at its disposal, it’ll need some rather wide tires back here. The taillights are simple round units with integrated reverse lights in the center. You can see the frame through the rear grille, which does allude to a but of laziness, but hey, it’s the power that’s important, right?

All told, the missile is 183-inches long, 80-inches wide, and 46-inches tall. It has a wheelbase of 112 inches and a ground clearance of just 4.72 inches – you could say it’s a low-rider, huh? It’s pretty clear that this thing is Italian and, if I didn’t know any better, I’d say there’s some Ferrari DNA in there, but we’ll leave that speculation here for now.

Corbellati Missile Interior

2018 Corbellati Missile Exterior
- image 773522
The interior of the Missile is shrouded in a cloud of mystery at this point

The interior of the Missile is shrouded in a cloud of mystery at this point. Based on the rearward engine-position, this thing clearly doesn’t have a back seat, so don’t expect one. Of course, for all we know, this thing could be a single-seater, with the driver’s home positioned right in the middle – a feature that harkens back to the McLaren F1 and more recent developments that point to the central driver’s position making a comeback. For now, however, we’ll just speculate a bit, with the expectation that the interior will be lavish with fine materials and there is, more than likely, more than enough tech inside. After all, this thing is billed as being the fastest car in the world – you don’t get there by being light in the tech department. An f1-like steering wheel, or at least something small, is likely and you can bet that the seats – or seat – is just a hair down from being a full-blown racing seat. A five-point harness is damn near guaranteed to be standard equipment. But, who knows what’s really going on inside there? Corbellati sure didn’t have anything to say at the Geneva Motor Show.

Corbellati Missile Performance

2018 Corbellati Missile
- image 769595
According to Corbellati, the Missile can deliver a cool 1,800 horsepower through a six-speed manual transmission straight to the rear wheels

Corbellati didn’t let us hear the Missile run. In fact, very little was said about it, but there is some detail to share here. First off, the chassis is built from carbon fiber as are the body panels. Keeping this thing sturdy in the turns is a double wishbone suspension in the front and rear, paired with inboard adjustable dampers and controlled air springs. Power is delivered by a 9.0-liter V-8 with two monster turbos (we assume) and a light alloy engine block. The cylinder head rocks four valves per cylinder, and there are four overhead camshafts (2 on each bank, 1 for exhaust one for intake.)

According to Corbellati, the Missile can deliver a cool 1,800 horsepower through a six-speed manual transmission straight to the rear wheels. The rear axle has a limited slip differential, and the steering is handled by your typical rack and pinion setup. And, just as important as the power produced is the stopping power. Monoblock six-piston calipers squeeze against carbon ceramic discs on all four corners.

And that’s it. That’s all we know. No 0-to-60 mph times to praise, or anything of this nature. However, Corbellati promises a top speed of 310 mph, which would make it the fastest car in the world should it ever actually hit that mark. We’ll certainly be standing by for that so stay tuned.

Conclusion

2018 Corbellati Missile Exterior
- image 773523

At this point, it’s hard to explain what kind of emotions a car like the evokes on one’s self. There’s a bit of excitement, skepticism, even denial. There’s no way a car can be that fast, right? Then again, the Venom F5 did hit 301 supposedly, so it’s really not that far off. The horsepower figures are certainly there but what about the limitation of tires? Is there a driveline out there strong enough to support such a deadly amount of power, even in a fairly short burst? I remained tremendously optimistic but, for now, I guess we’ll just have to wait and see.

References

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