Electric Scooter Buying Guide - Everything You Need to Consider

Electric Scooter Buying Guide - Everything You Need to Consider

With so many options out there, getting an e-scooter is nowhere near straightforward

The e-scooter industry might still be in its infancy, but these electrically-powered machines are enjoying an increasing amount of popularity by the day. People living in big cities have rushed to adopt this new trend out of purely practical reasons - with so many cars stuck in traffic, e-scooters are the shortcut more, and more people are willing to take. Factor in their relatively low maintenance costs and the fact that you can easily fold them for storage or transport purposes, plus the advantage of not getting to your destination with a sweaty back, like it happens with bicycles or kick scooters, and you get an unbeatable recipe.

But with high demand comes high offer. With more and more people looking to get an e-scooter, companies that produce them have multiplied like rabbits, and others are joining them as we speak. This means that you, the buyers, now has hundreds of options to choose from, from low-end, cheap e-scooters to performance and off-road-oriented ones. So, which one is best for you? Well, only you can decide that, but we’ll give you a hand with a guide that touches on what key aspects you should consider before placing that order.

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2016 - 2021 Yamaha TW200

2016 - 2021 Yamaha TW200

Fuel-injection haters rejoice! Yamaha still makes a carbureted dual sport

The Yamaha TW200, brought forward for 2021 with its scrappy little 196 cc engine, is a nice learning bike, fully street legal but with that distinctive motocross-style swale seat that says you’re going off-road. On the move, the bike has nice low-end torque and you’ll feel the front end trying to come up when you get even a little twisty. Dual sport, yes, but so much about this bike just begs to be in the dirt.

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2016 - 2020 Yamaha Zuma 125

2016 - 2020 Yamaha Zuma 125

Rugged no-nonsense styling is both modern and minimal

Reintroduced in 2011, Yamaha’s Zuma 125 provides a viable alternative to the old-fashioned, ’60s-style scooter prevalent from the Italian manufacturers, and those who would try to garner a slice of that market. A modern shape and revised chassis carries the four-stroke fuel-injected engine in a spiffy little scooter that — with upwards of 100+ mpg — makes a capable commuter or errand-runner.

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2017 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S1000F

2017 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S1000F

The GSX-S1000F has a GSX-R-derived engine for Gixxer thrills in a comfortable ride

Suzuki rolls its GSX-S1000F into MY2020 with a new Glass Sparkle Black colorway that is sure to turn heads, day or night. A GSX-R-based engine design delivers the goods with advanced rider-aid technology along with adjustable suspension and ABS protection to finish the package. This model makes an “all-new” return in 2020 after a hiatus last year.

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2019 - 2021 Kawasaki Ninja H2 SX SE+

2019 - 2021 Kawasaki Ninja H2 SX SE+

Kawi’s supercharged hyper-tourer lets the fiery-eyed peg draggers share with a friend

Kawasaki beefed up its Ninja lineup ahead of MY2019 with the upgraded H2 SX SE+. Competition is fierce at the top of the liter-bike range, but Kawi has a not-so-secret weapon in its fight for street dominance in the form of a supercharger (compressor) that significantly boosts performance. The electronic suite received a buff as well with electronic suspension control bundled with new riding modes and the ability to network with your smartphone. Plus, it rocks a “self-repairing” finish that resists dings and scratches to help it keep its curb value.

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2019 - 2021 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R

2019 - 2021 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R

The ZX-6R is probably the fastest bike you’ll find for less than $10k

Kawasaki’s Ninja lineup made a well-deserved impression on the sportbike sector, and the factory elevates its game with the ZX-6R. This mid-size Ninja “636” added last year carried a host of improvements that range from vanity-to-vroom with spruced-up looks, LED lighting, and new instrumentation, just to name a few. The electronics were upgraded as well, and the new features stack with the incumbent power modes, traction control, and Kawasaki’s own Intelligent Brake System.

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2015 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-R750

2015 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-R750

The GSX-R750 is certainly not for the faint of heart

Suzuki keeps improving and expanding its signature supersport series, and the 2020 GSX-R750 carries the torch first ignited by the original Gixxer 750 all the way back in 1984. Granted, the “late model” Gixxers dropped the steel frame in favor of aluminum, and the air-cooled engine has been replaced with a jacketed mill, but the overall mission for the bike remains the same: to provide the general public with the most race-ready production bike available for legal use on the street. Of course, the rest of the market has caught up to Suzuki and the supersport segment is flooded with similarly capable rides — and a good number of more capable sleds — though the most race-tastic of them are far more expensive than the $12K-ish GSX-R750.

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2015 - 2019 Suzuki GSX-R600

2015 - 2019 Suzuki GSX-R600

The GSX-R600: It’s a Gixxer... ’nuff said

Suzuki continues the Gixxer family legacy into the 2020 model year with the GSX-R600 powered by a 599 cc engine and includes all the sporty handling that is expected in this prestigious line.

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2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

Suzuki put a new fuel-injected engine in the GSX-S750 for an even more thrilling ride

Suzuki shuffled its “standard” selections ahead of MY2019 with a new powerplant based on the proven Gixxer mill. The 2020 GSX-S750 comes sans ABS, but the lineup includes an ABS model in the custom-flavored, “Z” blackout package that the factory hopes will cover all the bases in the mid-size naked-sport sector. Additionally, it rocks a robust electronics suite with engine-control features as well as safety-related goodies. Power and agility (read: fun) come together with Spartan looks and a modicum of comfort on these bikes.

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2017 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-R1000R

2017 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-R1000R

GSX-R1000R: Fiery-Eyed Pegdraggers Rejoice!

Coming off a fresh update in 2017, Suzuki carries its GSX-R1000R into MY2020 with little else in the way of changes. The next-gen “Gixxer” 1000 brought an all-new 999.8 cc powerplant to the table with a claimed 199 horsepower at the shaft and a whole passel of electronic goodies to help manage all those ponies. Traction control, lean-sensitive ABS, launch control and more, Suzuki’s flagship literbike comes equipped with overlapping safety nets to help keep us mortal, non-professional riders dirty-side down as we explore our electronically augmented performance envelope. MotoGP tech influences the design to give the rider a little taste of track-day performance, or at the very least, ’performance light.’

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2018 - 2020 Suzuki GSX250R

2018 - 2020 Suzuki GSX250R

The GSX250R is the mighty little sportbike that could

All-new in 2018, the GSX250R from [Suzuki-mot291] is set to enter the race to the bottom. Not the bottom of the stack, but the bottom of the displacement range with its 248 cc fuel-injected, liquid-cooled, parallel-twin engine. Suzuki jumps on the go-small-or-go-home bandwagon with a sportbike carrying all the genetic markers of the Katana family, and exactly what you would expect from one of the Big Four.

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2015 - 2020 Suzuki DR200S

2015 - 2020 Suzuki DR200S

It’s a tried-and-true dual sport

Suzuki brings dual-sport capabilities to the entry-level sector with its DR200S. A heavy emphasis on off-road performance defines the overall look; and a 199 cc engine drives it over hill and dale, as well as down the road with all the appropriate lighting for safety and legalities. The end result is a functional, if plain, bike that provides a stable ride and moderate power with a humble overall bearing. A carry-over for the last few years, it hasn’t changed much, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

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2015 - 2019 Suzuki DR650S

2015 - 2019 Suzuki DR650S

The DR650S could be the “I-wanna-have-fun” bike you’ll hang on to

It’s not the most attractive bike in the dual sport stable, though it’s small and scrappy with a 644 cc engine and so much fun to ride. With a glance at the DR650S from Suzuki you might just dismiss it as an enduro bike. That would be doing it an injustice. It’s really a basic adventure bike that will get you off the pavement and into the woods with perhaps more gumption than a real adventure bike. Priced affordably, it isn’t tragic to drop it as it would be otherwise and it is lightweight enough that you can pick it up and keep going.

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2016 - 2020 Suzuki DR-Z400S / DR-Z400SM

2016 - 2020 Suzuki DR-Z400S / DR-Z400SM

Suzuki Still Has Carbureted Dual Sports

Pitting the fuel-injection fans against the carburetor fans, we score a point for the latter with the DR-Z400S and DR-Z400SM from Suzuki. Fuel injection hasn’t yet made an appearance in Suzuki’s dual-sport lineup, which was a good thing or a bad thing, depending on which side of the fence you’re on. For 2020, the DR-Z siblings haven’t yet been touched by the FI update. Sharing the same engine as the 500EXC from KTM, the DR-Zs come on a different chassis with progressive-link rear suspension. The “SM” — the SuperMoto of the family — and the “S” feature a six-liter air box with quick-release fasteners trouble-free access to the air filter and special low profile mirrors that rotate hoping to avoid damage, both are pluses when you’re playing in the dirt.

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2015 - 2020 Honda Shadow Aero / Shadow Phantom

2015 - 2020 Honda Shadow Aero / Shadow Phantom

This is vintage American-cruiser style

Honda made an honest attempt to capture that look and feel of yesteryear with the Shadow duo, the big brothers to the Rebel range. Maybe just a little too honest – is that a mechanical drum brake I see? Still with a 745 cc engine and a wide-ratio transmission, the Shadow Phantom and the Aero fill the "cruiser" slot quite adequately for Honda.

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2015 - 2020 Honda Ruckus

2015 - 2020 Honda Ruckus

This has got to be the Mad Max of scooterdom

Bare bones — naked bike, anyone? — and gnarly, the Ruckus looks like it’s right out of Mad Max. Even though it does have a 50 cc engine, no one is going to say, “Awww, isn’t that cute?” when you ride by on a Honda Ruckus. Granted, you won’t get going very fast on a Ruckus, so on-lookers will get a good, long look.

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A Deep Look Into Aston Martin's Mid-Engined History

A Deep Look Into Aston Martin’s Mid-Engined History

The 2019 Aston Martin Valkyrie might’ve been the spark that ignited a revolution but it wasn’t the first of its kind

Aston Martin is known as a maker of exquisite and refined grand tourers, long-legged cars that offer enough panache to satisfy Ian Fleming’s James Bond on many an occasion. You could say Aston Martin knows every trick there is to know when it comes to building a front-engined GT car and that’s why they’re now looking to build more and more cars with the engine behind the seats. But the Valkyrie, the new Vanquish, and the AM-RB 003 aren’t the first of their kind in Aston Martin’s history.

When you think of any DB model from Aston Martin, you imagine an elegant two-door tourer ready for long journeys with a sumptuous and well-appointed interior and a feisty engine in front of the windshield. The company’s one and only Le Mans winner, the DBR1, was also front-engined as was the futuristic brick-like Lagonda luxury sedan from the ’70s. But, then, in the ’80s, when Aston Martin returned to sports car racing, it did so with a mid-engined car. This effectively heralded a new breed of Aston Martins, one that has stayed away from the public highways up until now but one that’s interesting to look into nonetheless.

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2018 - 2020 Honda NC750X

2018 - 2020 Honda NC750X

It’s a pragmatist’s approach to two wheels

Honda introduced the NC750X to the U.S. market in 2018 to solidify its position in the adventure-commuter sector. Like its predecessor, the NC700X, the new sled is built for comfortable riding with a capacity for touring. The new engine lends it a sportier attitude with 54 horsepower on tap and a two-level torque control to help you keep it under control.

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2016 - 2020 Honda Metropolitan

2016 - 2020 Honda Metropolitan

The Metropolitan to us, the Giorno to the rest of the world

Honda revamped its classic-looking Metropolitan – known in other markets as the Giorno – for the 2016 model year. Early models enjoyed a bit of popularity starting back in 2002, but that took a hit with the changes made for the ’13 models up through ’15. The factory proves that it listens to customer feedback and acts on it with a fresh set of changes for the 2016 and 2017 models, tweaks that directly address the concerns coming from the customers. On the top of the list was a new, liquid-cooled engine that ramped up overall performance, as well as relocating the fuel tank for more storage under the seat. What we have for 2020 is a scooter that aims to regain the popularity it once enjoyed with a classic look and a revamped engine.

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2016 - 2019 Honda Fury / Stateline

2016 - 2019 Honda Fury / Stateline

Gotta love that stretched, custom look in a production bike

The Honda designers targeted the outlaw chopper culture of the ’60s and ’70s, and managed to turn out a fairly faithful interpretation in the Fury, which is carried into 2020 though we lost its stablemate, the Stateline, from the lineup in 2017. The deep saddle and cut-down rear fender combined with the sweep of the fuel tank give it that stretched, custom look. For the American market, the 52-degree V-twin fits right in with a 1,312 cc engine that isn’t so big as to be intimidating.

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2019 - 2020 Honda CBR650R

2019 - 2020 Honda CBR650R

This is the the new mid-displacement kid on the block

Honda dropped an “F” and added an “R” to its lineup last year with its new CBR650R. The factory gave it a look that’s all its own with new fairings and a trim rear end, and it adds to the R’s race-tastic tendencies with an aggressive rider’s triangle. New Showa stems and powerful brakes add value while the souped-up engine adds compression and power to make the R a thrill to ride, along with new electronic safety features to help you keep it dirty-side down.

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2014 - 2020 Honda CBR600RR

2014 - 2020 Honda CBR600RR

It’s a MotoGP-inspired race replica

Honda’s latest generation of 600 cc, CBR supersports toes the family line with its race-winning blend of power and maneuverability all packed onto a MotoGP-inspired chassis. Much like the original CBR600RR that hit the streets back in ’03 and was built as a racebike replica, the current model features a strong engine along with a front suspension featuring Honda’s 41mm Big Piston Fork for superb handling and snappy action, plus MotoGP-inspired bodywork in a race-tested aerodynamic supersport design.

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2019 - 2020 Honda CBR500R

2019 - 2020 Honda CBR500R

Now with more power in the mid-range, right where you need it

Honda spruced up its CBR500R ahead of MY2018, and in an unusual move, buffed it up yet again for MY2019. The new model dips further into race-tastic territory with aerodynamics and ergonomics as the main front-burner considerations for an effort far beyond the BNL treatment, and the factory also tweaked the drivetrain to give it a bit more go to match the sporty new show.

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