Electric Scooter Buying Guide - Everything You Need to Consider

Electric Scooter Buying Guide - Everything You Need to Consider

With so many options out there, getting an e-scooter is nowhere near straightforward

The e-scooter industry might still be in its infancy, but these electrically-powered machines are enjoying an increasing amount of popularity by the day. People living in big cities have rushed to adopt this new trend out of purely practical reasons - with so many cars stuck in traffic, e-scooters are the shortcut more, and more people are willing to take. Factor in their relatively low maintenance costs and the fact that you can easily fold them for storage or transport purposes, plus the advantage of not getting to your destination with a sweaty back, like it happens with bicycles or kick scooters, and you get an unbeatable recipe.

But with high demand comes high offer. With more and more people looking to get an e-scooter, companies that produce them have multiplied like rabbits, and others are joining them as we speak. This means that you, the buyers, now has hundreds of options to choose from, from low-end, cheap e-scooters to performance and off-road-oriented ones. So, which one is best for you? Well, only you can decide that, but we’ll give you a hand with a guide that touches on what key aspects you should consider before placing that order.

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2015 - 2020 Honda Shadow Aero / Shadow Phantom

2015 - 2020 Honda Shadow Aero / Shadow Phantom

This is vintage American-cruiser style

Honda made an honest attempt to capture that look and feel of yesteryear with the Shadow duo, the big brothers to the Rebel range. Maybe just a little too honest – is that a mechanical drum brake I see? Still with a 745 cc engine and a wide-ratio transmission, the Shadow Phantom and the Aero fill the "cruiser" slot quite adequately for Honda.

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2015 - 2020 Honda Ruckus

2015 - 2020 Honda Ruckus

This has got to be the Mad Max of scooterdom

Bare bones — naked bike, anyone? — and gnarly, the Ruckus looks like it’s right out of Mad Max. Even though it does have a 50 cc engine, no one is going to say, “Awww, isn’t that cute?” when you ride by on a Honda Ruckus. Granted, you won’t get going very fast on a Ruckus, so on-lookers will get a good, long look.

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A Deep Look Into Aston Martin's Mid-Engined History

A Deep Look Into Aston Martin’s Mid-Engined History

The 2019 Aston Martin Valkyrie might’ve been the spark that ignited a revolution but it wasn’t the first of its kind

Aston Martin is known as a maker of exquisite and refined grand tourers, long-legged cars that offer enough panache to satisfy Ian Fleming’s James Bond on many an occasion. You could say Aston Martin knows every trick there is to know when it comes to building a front-engined GT car and that’s why they’re now looking to build more and more cars with the engine behind the seats. But the Valkyrie, the new Vanquish, and the AM-RB 003 aren’t the first of their kind in Aston Martin’s history.

When you think of any DB model from Aston Martin, you imagine an elegant two-door tourer ready for long journeys with a sumptuous and well-appointed interior and a feisty engine in front of the windshield. The company’s one and only Le Mans winner, the DBR1, was also front-engined as was the futuristic brick-like Lagonda luxury sedan from the ’70s. But, then, in the ’80s, when Aston Martin returned to sports car racing, it did so with a mid-engined car. This effectively heralded a new breed of Aston Martins, one that has stayed away from the public highways up until now but one that’s interesting to look into nonetheless.

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2018 - 2020 Honda NC750X

2018 - 2020 Honda NC750X

It’s a pragmatist’s approach to two wheels

Honda introduced the NC750X to the U.S. market in 2018 to solidify its position in the adventure-commuter sector. Like its predecessor, the NC700X, the new sled is built for comfortable riding with a capacity for touring. The new engine lends it a sportier attitude with 54 horsepower on tap and a two-level torque control to help you keep it under control.

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2016 - 2020 Honda Metropolitan

2016 - 2020 Honda Metropolitan

The Metropolitan to us, the Giorno to the rest of the world

Honda revamped its classic-looking Metropolitan – known in other markets as the Giorno – for the 2016 model year. Early models enjoyed a bit of popularity starting back in 2002, but that took a hit with the changes made for the ’13 models up through ’15. The factory proves that it listens to customer feedback and acts on it with a fresh set of changes for the 2016 and 2017 models, tweaks that directly address the concerns coming from the customers. On the top of the list was a new, liquid-cooled engine that ramped up overall performance, as well as relocating the fuel tank for more storage under the seat. What we have for 2020 is a scooter that aims to regain the popularity it once enjoyed with a classic look and a revamped engine.

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2016 - 2019 Honda Fury / Stateline

2016 - 2019 Honda Fury / Stateline

Gotta love that stretched, custom look in a production bike

The Honda designers targeted the outlaw chopper culture of the ’60s and ’70s, and managed to turn out a fairly faithful interpretation in the Fury, which is carried into 2020 though we lost its stablemate, the Stateline, from the lineup in 2017. The deep saddle and cut-down rear fender combined with the sweep of the fuel tank give it that stretched, custom look. For the American market, the 52-degree V-twin fits right in with a 1,312 cc engine that isn’t so big as to be intimidating.

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2019 - 2020 Honda CBR650R

2019 - 2020 Honda CBR650R

This is the the new mid-displacement kid on the block

Honda dropped an “F” and added an “R” to its lineup last year with its new CBR650R. The factory gave it a look that’s all its own with new fairings and a trim rear end, and it adds to the R’s race-tastic tendencies with an aggressive rider’s triangle. New Showa stems and powerful brakes add value while the souped-up engine adds compression and power to make the R a thrill to ride, along with new electronic safety features to help you keep it dirty-side down.

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2014 - 2020 Honda CBR600RR

2014 - 2020 Honda CBR600RR

It’s a MotoGP-inspired race replica

Honda’s latest generation of 600 cc, CBR supersports toes the family line with its race-winning blend of power and maneuverability all packed onto a MotoGP-inspired chassis. Much like the original CBR600RR that hit the streets back in ’03 and was built as a racebike replica, the current model features a strong engine along with a front suspension featuring Honda’s 41mm Big Piston Fork for superb handling and snappy action, plus MotoGP-inspired bodywork in a race-tested aerodynamic supersport design.

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2019 - 2020 Honda CBR500R

2019 - 2020 Honda CBR500R

Now with more power in the mid-range, right where you need it

Honda spruced up its CBR500R ahead of MY2018, and in an unusual move, buffed it up yet again for MY2019. The new model dips further into race-tastic territory with aerodynamics and ergonomics as the main front-burner considerations for an effort far beyond the BNL treatment, and the factory also tweaked the drivetrain to give it a bit more go to match the sporty new show.

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2015 - 2020 Honda CBR300R

2015 - 2020 Honda CBR300R

It’s a Fireblade that was left in the dryer too long

Honda shows us that big isn’t always better with its CBR300R. As the small-displacement sportbike bracket fills in from every quarter, the CBR300R with its 286 cc engine has the aggressive look and feel of the bigger bikes – like a Fireblade you left in the dryer too long — but in a commuter-friendly version that could be a stepping stone on your way up the displacement ladder.

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2019 - 2020 Honda CB650R

2019 - 2020 Honda CB650R

The new neo-sport café adds its retro-tastic flare to the middleweight field

After a race to the upper displacement range and a subsequent search for the bottom usable cubage, Honda revisited its midrange and spruced up its CB650R ahead of the 2019 model year. That’s right sports fans; the Neo Sport Café concept has gone to production under this new moniker, and it rolled into MY19 with a handful of tweaks that brushed up the looks and carve off a little fat. The powerplant also took a beating from the buffhammer to turn out a 5-percent increase in power with changes to improve rideability and safety.

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2019 - 2021 Honda CB500X

2019 - 2021 Honda CB500X

It’s even more adventure-tastic now

Honda brushed up its CB500X ahead of MY2019 with a number of improvements that came hot on the heels of the buffs it got just the year before. A number of engine tweaks net a small gain in torque, along with a larger front wheel to better tackle road bumps and light terrain. The ’stop’ was boosted right along with the ’go’ in the form of a few refinements in the electronics department, as well as the hardware. Improvements in the suspension and rider’s triangle do their bit to increase rideability and comfort on Honda’s new smallish-displacement adventure bike.

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This Detail Video of the Manthey Racing Kit for the Porsche 911 GT3 Will Give You the Itch

This Detail Video of the Manthey Racing Kit for the Porsche 911 GT3 Will Give You the Itch

The 911 GT3 RS is a complete sports car, but this kit somehow builds on that quite nicely

Mansory and company, do take notes. This is how you improve on a presumably well-rounded recipe that offers staggering performance right off the factory gate WITHOUT messing up with its design. Let’s check out this 911 GT3 by Manthey Racing.

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2018 - 2020 Harley-Davidson Street Bob

2018 - 2020 Harley-Davidson Street Bob

Risen from the ashes of the Dynas, the Street Bob was rebuilt and reintroduced as a Softail

The Harley-Davidson lineup underwent some serious changes for MY2018, and the chopped-down, Dyna-based Street Bob was rebuilt and reintroduced as a Softail model. Not only did it switch to Harley’s faux-rigid style frame, but the frame itself was completely reinvented to the point where it bears little resemblance to the original that saw the light of day for the first time back in ’84. Sure, it still has that classic Softail visage, but the factory achieved it in a totally different way this time, and any perceived similarities are only skin deep. To add to the revamp, the Street Bob was on the receiving end of a beating-heart transplant with the addition of the then-new-to-cruisers, Milwaukee-Eight 107 powerplant that brings over 100 pounds of grunt to the table. The Street Bob has more power, new frame, and a new family/model combination as it rolls through to 2020.

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2016 - 2020 Harley-Davidson Roadster

2016 - 2020 Harley-Davidson Roadster

Maybe not fast, but it’s certainly quick

A little sparse, a little spare, and an exercise in understatement describes the new-in-2016 Harley-Davidson Roadster, at least in appearance. Performance-wise, it’s agile with a greater lean angle than what you typically find in the Sportster stable. Not just a cut-down Sportster, the Roadster features a different frame and enhanced suspension along with the tried-and-true air-cooled Evolution engine.

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2018 - 2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider

2018 - 2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider

It’s one of the Softail initiates from the Dyna family

Powered by the Milwaukee-Eight engine with a total of 110 pound-feet of torque, the agile Softail frame brings heretofore unseen performance to the Low Rider. Harley-Davidson is digging deep to give us better handling and more power and the Low Rider is a prime example.

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2016 - 2020 Harley-Davidson Street 500 / Street 750

2016 - 2020 Harley-Davidson Street 500 / Street 750

It’s a no-nonsense approach to a bar-hopping café racer

Powered by a Revolution V-twin engine, the Street 500 and 750 are premium Harley-Davidson even though they’re geared toward the budget-minded, entry-level crowd. Just because the price is low doesn’t mean they skimped on quality. The Street siblings come with a steel teardrop tank and fenders covered in the deep, rich color, and flawless finish that long ago made Harley-Davidson the benchmark for premium paint on a motorcycle. The cherry on top is the chrome tank badge — not a decal, as you might expect in an economy-priced bike, but a three-dimensional tank medallion — as Harley’s pledge to you that you are riding a premium quality machine.

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2017 - 2020 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

2017 - 2020 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

Harley’s Hot Little Urban Commuter

Traffic-carving performance wasn’t the first thing I thought of when hearing the name Harley-Davidson, but the MoCo started changing that perception with the new-in-2017 Street Rod 750. While it is, in fact, based on the Street 750, multiple changes in the setup and equipment turn it into another animal entirely. Shorter steering geometry, a more aggressive rider triangle and a more powerful engine come together in H-D’s decisive push into the sport-standard market.

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Is the Ferrari 812 Superfast A True GT? A Trip from The UK to France Holds The Answer

Is the Ferrari 812 Superfast A True GT? A Trip from The UK to France Holds The Answer

This front-engined Ferrari has got the performance, but what about long-distance comfort?

You’d think the Ferrari 812 Superfast has been turned over its every side by pretty much all the car journos that matter at the moment and you’d be right. However, Harry Metcalfe of Harry’s Garage wanted to see if the super-fast Superfast can be used as a good old grand tourer, as Ferrari claims. Hence this 35-minute experiment transposed into a YouTube video.

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2018 - 2020 Indian Motorcycle Scout Bobber

2018 - 2020 Indian Motorcycle Scout Bobber

It’s a bare-bones bike; when you ride, it’s just you and the machine

Indian Motorcycle has certainly called some attention to its mid-size bikes through its success on the flat track, and the Scout Bobber looks to capitalize on that by garnering some of the factory-custom business. The “Bobber” brings modern performance to the table along with the overall look of the iconic bobber style, yet fits in well with the rest of the made-for-the-US market, foreign and domestic built. An 1,133 cc plant delivers the power, and last year, the Bobber rocked improved electronics plus a USB charging port, regardless of which color you choose.

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2019 - 2020 Indian Springfield

2019 - 2020 Indian Springfield

It’s among the least expensive of Indian’s baggers

Indian Motorcycle cashes in on its deep design roots with the Springfield model that hit the market in ’16 and has been carried over into the 2020 model year with nary but a few adjustments to the color palette. Power comes from what was Indian’s largest production engine prior to 2020, along with ABS and keyless ignition on board, but it’s the classic, old-school bagger looks that drive sales of this particular unit. Best of all, it’s among the least expensive of the available baggers, and that positions it well within the boulevard-bruiser/light-tour categories.

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