• Affordable Ferraris That Could Make Great Future Investments

These 8 cars from Ferrari will not break the bank...too much

Whether you are a car enthusiast or not, it’s common knowledge that owning a Ferrari signifies certain success in life. Of course, owning a Ferrari comes at a great financial cost (and sometimes more, if your wife does not approve), so it’s better to make sure you can afford one in the first place, before taking the leap. That said, even Ferraris aren’t safe from depreciation, unless they are highly exclusive, and these few models, listed below, are a perfect example.

Maintenance costs can still be sinfully expensive, but on the plus side, some of these cars have already bottomed out in terms of price, which means they could be a good investment in the long run.

Ferrari Dino 208 / 308 GT4 (1973-1980)

Affordable Ferraris That Could Make Great Future Investments
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Ferrari 208 and 308 GT4 are 2+2 coupes, which succeeded the Mondial. Depending on the version, they are powered by either a 2.0-liter V-8 with 170 horsepower and 137 pound-feet (186 Nm) or a 2.9-liter V-8 with 255 horsepower and 210 pound-feet (285 Nm). This allowed for a 0 to 60 mph (97 km/) time of 7.6 seconds and a top speed of 137 mph (220 km/h). For the more powerful 308 GT4, those numbers are 6.4 seconds and 154 mph (248 km/h). Both versions used a five-speed manual gearbox to send power to the rear wheels. You have to part with around $53,000.

Ferrari Dino specifications
Engine 2.0-liter V-8/ 2.9-liter V-8
Power 170 HP/255 HP
Torque 137 LB-FT / 210 LB-FT
0 to 60 mph 7.6 seconds/6.4 seconds
Top Speed 137 mph (220 km/h)/154 mph (248 km/h)
Transmission five-speed manual

Read our full reviews on the Ferrari Dino 208 / 308 GT4

Ferrari 208/308 GTB & GTS (1975-1985) & Ferrari 328 (1986-1989)

1980 Ferrari 208 GTB
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The Ferrari 208/308 GTB (Berlinetta) and GTS (Spider) are essentially the sportier and more upscale two-seat equivalents of the Dino 208/308 GT4, while the 328 is their successor. The same engines made their way in here, while the 328 (1986-1989) used a more powerful 3.2-liter V-8, producing 270 horsepower and 225 pound-feet (305 Nm), allowing the 2,784-pound (1,263 kg) mid-engine classic to hit 60 mph in just 5.5 seconds, on its way to 166 mph (267 km/h). The Spider performance slightly worse, with a 0 to 60 mph time of 5.9 seconds and a top speed of 163 mph (263 km/h).

Ferrari 328 specifications
Ferrari 3.2-liter V-8
Power 270 HP
Torque 225 LB_FT
Weight 2,784 lbs (1,263 kg)
0 to 60 mph 5.5 seconds
Top Speed 166 mph (267 km/h)
1977 - 1980 Ferrari 308 GTS
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A decent 208/308 Berlinetta or Spider will set you back around $58,000, while the newer 328 will cost you around $85,000.

Read our full reviews on the Ferrari 208/308 GTB & GTS (1975-1985) & Ferrari 328

Ferrari Mondial (1980-1993)

Affordable Ferraris That Could Make Great Future Investments Exterior
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We start with the cheapest, but probably least desired “Prancing Horse”. Sadly, having a Ferrari badge doesn’t always mean the car is quick. The Mondial is the perfect (and luckily the only) example on our list. The rather GT-oriented 2+2 coupe or cabriolet was powered by a rather lackluster mid-mounted V-8, with a displacement of 3.0 - to 3.4 liters in the last model years.

The Mondial had four versions: The Mondial 8 (1980-1982) with 2014 horsepower (205 for the US), Mondial QV (1983-1985) with a 24-valve version of the 3.0-liter V-8, making 240 horsepower (230 for the US), Mondial 3.2 (1986-1988), which brings more engine displacement and 270 horsepower (260 for the US), and Mondial t (1988-1993), with an even bigger 3.4-liter V-8 and 300 horsepower (295 for the US). The convertible body type was introduced in 1983 and had a slightly smaller backseat.

1989 - 1993 Ferrari Mondial T
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Although some appreciated the extra practicality that comes with rear seats, many did not consider it a proper Ferrari. This means you can get one for as little as $37,000 right now. Moreover, since there are less than 7,000 produced, you still get the exclusivity factory. Be aware that, although it’s still a Ferrari, the 0 to 60 mph (97 km/h) sprint takes from 8 to 5.6 seconds, depending on the version. The top speed is 146-161 mph (235-259 km/h).

Read our full review on the Ferrari Mondial

Ferrari 348 (1989-1995)

1993 - 1994 Ferrari 348 GTB
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The good thing about this list is that it will only get better from here on. The 348 may not be Ferrari’s finest hour, but it definitely had the zest, which, according to some, was lacking in the Mondial. The 348 does away with the second-row seats, sacrificing practicality in the name of performance. The 3.4-liter mid-mounted V-8 develops up to 320 horsepower and 239 pound-feet (324 Nm), allowing for a 0 to 60 mph (97 km/) time of around 5.4 seconds and a top speed of 174 mph (280 km/h).

Ferrari 348 specifications
Engine 3.4-liter mid-mounted V-8
Power 320 HP
Torque 239 LB-FT
0 to 60 mph 5.4 seconds
Top Speed 174 mph (280 km/h)
Affordable Ferraris That Could Make Great Future Investments
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The 348 is the last mid-engine Ferrari, which can be had only with a five-speed manual. It also features the coveted gated shifter. It’s a bit more mass-produced than the Mondial, with 8,844 examples built. Prices for good examples start at around $55,000.

Read our full review on the Ferrari 348

Ferrari F355 (1995-1999)

Affordable Ferraris That Could Make Great Future Investments
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“More than you can afford pal. Ferrari!” Anyone who’s watched the original Fast & Furious movie remembers this line. Nowadays, the line would be more like “More than you can afford pal. Supra!” In any case, the F355 succeeded the 348 from before. It’s a bit rounder, more refined, and more powerful than the outgoing car. Essentially, a better 348.

The engine is now a 3.5-liter V-8 with five valves per cylinder, developing 380 horsepower and 268 pound-feet (363 Nm). This allows the mid-engine Italian stallion to sprint to 60 mph in just 4.4 seconds, on its way to a top speed of 186 mph (300 km/h). You now have a choice between a six-speed manual and a six-speed “F1” automated manual. You can also choose between a Berlinetta (Coupe), Targa, and a Spider.

1995 - 1999 Ferrari F355
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Ferrari F355 specifications
Engine 3.5-liter V-8
Power 380 HP
Torque 268 LB-FT
0 to 60 mph 4.4 seconds
Top Speed 186 mph (300 km/h)
Transmission six-speed manual and a six-speed “F1” automated

You can also choose between a Berlinetta (Coupe), Targa, and a Spider. With 11,273, the F355 is still a relatively exclusive vehicle. If you want one, prices for good examples start at around $65,000.

Read our full review on the Ferrari F355

Ferrari 360 Modena/Spider (2000-2004)

1999 - 2004 Ferrari 360 Modena Wallpaper quality
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There is a pattern shaping up, but fear not, this is the last mid-engine Ferrari. The 360 is the successor to the F355 and is the first mid-engine Ferrari to go into the new century. Gone were the pop-up headlights and the lines were even curvier than the F355, which was still very much 1990s and even a bit 1980s, as it carried over quite a bit from the 348.

In every other aspect, the 360 was basically more of the same, just better. The 3.6-liter 90-degree V-8 makes 400 horsepower at 8,500 RPM and 275 pound-feet at 4,750 RPM. This allows for a 4.2-second sprint to 60 mph and a top speed of 183 mph (295 km/h) for the Modena and 180 mph (290 km/h) for the Spider. Once again, you can choose between a six-speed manual and the more common (sadly) automated manual with the same number of gears.

Ferrari 360 specifications
Engine 3.6-liter V-8
Horsepower 400 HP @ 8,500 RPM
Torque 275 LB-FT @ 4,750 RPM
0 to 60 mph 4.2 seconds
Top Speed 183 mph (295 km/h) (coupe)/180 mph (290 km/h) (spider)
Transmission six-speed manual/ six-speed automated
1999 - 2005 Ferrari 360 Spider
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Just over 16,000 examples were built (Modena and Spider combined) Surprisingly, the 360 is more affordable than some of its predecessors. A good example with around 50,000 miles on the clock can be had for less than $60,000. As with the others on the list, if you want a really pristine one, you have to pay more. Oh and you can forget about limited versions like the 360 Challenge Stradale.

Read our full review on the Ferrari 360 Modena/Spider

Ferrari 456 (1992-2003)

1992 - 1997 Ferrari 456 GT
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Ferrari 456GT

Here’s an interesting one. The 456 (456M from 1997) is one of the more forgotten Ferrari models. You could say it was the slightly tamer 2+2 version of the 550 Maranello. By all means, it is a gran-tourer rather than a canyon carver, but it still has the Ferrari zest. The engine is a 5.5-liter V-12 with 442 horsepower and 406 pound-feet (550 Nm). Unlike the previous cars on the list, it’s more of a torque monster than a rev-happy unit and that perfectly suits the car.

Throughout its 11-year production cycle, only 3,289 were made, which makes it one of the most exclusive cars on the list. Just because it’s a GT car doesn’t mean it’s slow. Despite weighing in at 3,946 pounds (1,790 kg), the V-12 Ferrari accelerates to 60 mph (97 km/h) in 4.8 seconds, on its way to 186 mph (300 km/h). Power goes to the rear through a six-speed manual or a four-speed automatic.

Affordable Ferraris That Could Make Great Future Investments
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Ferrari 456 specifications
Engine 5.5-liter V-12
Power 422 HP
Torque 406 LB-FT
Weight 3,946 lbs (1,790 kg)
Transmission six-speed manual/four-speed automatic
0 to 60 mph 4.8 seconds
Top Speed 186 mph (300 km/h)

Price-wise, you get a lot of car for the money, at least compared to other used Ferraris. Currently, a good 456 goes for around $63,000. Interestingly enough, many people don’t know about it, which is why the 456 continues to depreciate. Prices are currently fluctuating and the cheapest 456 was sold for just $25,250. On the other spectrum, the most expensive 456 was sold for $148,500, while one of the more recent documented sales was for $51,000. In any case, this is currently the cheapest way to get a V-12 Ferrari.

Read our full review on the Ferrari 456

Ferrari 612 Scaglietti (2004-2011)

Affordable Ferraris That Could Make Great Future Investments
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If you think the 456 is your only “attainable” option for a V-12 Ferrari, you are wrong. The Ferrari 612 Scaglietti is the natural successor to the 456, picking up the torch from 2004. It even follows a similar design, although much more rounded. The only exception are the pop-up headlights, which have been replaced with conventional units. Like its predecessor, it’s a 2+2 gran-tourer, with a torquey naturally-aspirated V-12 upfront.

This time it’s the 5.7-liter F133 V-12, producing 540 horsepower and 434 pound-feet (588 Nm). All this is sent to the rear through a six-speed manual or a six-speed automated manual. The 612 Scaglietti is noticeably heavier, at 4,231 pounds (1,919 kg), but it still manages a 4.0-second time to 60 mph (97 km/h) and a top speed of 199 mph (320 km/h).

Affordable Ferraris That Could Make Great Future Investments
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Ferrari 612 Scaglietti specifications
Engine 5.7-liter F133 V-12
Power 540 HP
Torque 434 LB-FT
Transmission six-speed manual/ six-speed automated
Weight 4,231 lbs (1,919 kg)
0 to 60 mph 4.0 seconds
Top Speed 199 mph (320 km/h)

In its seven-year production cycle, the V-12 Italian GT was produced in 3,025 copies. Currently, the average price for a 612 Scaglietti is around $106,000. However, many good examples can be found for around $85,000.

Read our full review on the Ferrari 612 Scaglietti

Dim Angelov
Dim Angelov
Born in 1992, I come from a family of motoring enthusiasts. My passion for cars was awoken at the age of six, when I saw a Lamborghini Diablo SV in a magazine. After high school I earned a master’s degree in marketing and a Master of Arts in Media and Communications. Over the years, I’ve practiced and become skilled in precision driving and to date have test driven more than 250 cars across the globe. Over the years, I’ve picked up basic mechanical knowledge and have even taken part in the restoration of a 1964 Jaguar E-Type and an Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint. Lately, I’ve taken a fancy to automotive photography, and while modern cars are my primary passion, I also have a love for Asian Martial Arts, swimming, war history, craft beer, historical weapons, and car restoration. In time, I plan my own classic car restoration and hope to earn my racing certificate, after which I expect to establish my own racing team.  Read full bio
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