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1993 Alfa Romeo RZ by Zagato

1993 Alfa Romeo RZ by Zagato

The Alfa SZ for those who want to be seen in one

The Alfa Romeo RZ is the equally-boxy and equally odd open-top version of the icon that is the SZ. Controversial at the time, the Zagato styling of the SZ/RZ family is now, 30 years on, considered downright legendary.

Produced as a limited-run joint project between Alfa Romeo and Fiat, the SZ Coupe and the RZ Roadster were laid on the underpinnings of the famed Alfa Romeo 75. Little over 1,000 SZs were built while the production cycle of the RZ began just after the final SZ was put together. Although the exact number varies depending on the source, no more than 285 Alfa Romeo RZ cars were ever built, making it much rarer than the already sought-after coupe.

The RZ was equipped with the same four-cam engine as the SZ although the lack of a solid roof makes the RZ the slower of the two. Alfa Romeo also chose to offer the SZ in more than one color combination, customers being offered the opportunity to pick their SZ up in either yellow or black, besides the customary red which was the only color available for the coupe. The last SZ rolled out of Zagato’s plant in Terrazzano di Rho in 1994 and, in spite of their popularity among the fans of the brand, the SZ and RZ aren’t particularly expensive to grab nowadays.

Keep reading to learn more about the odd Alfa Romeo RZ

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1933 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza

1933 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza

A prime example of a very successful race car

While there may have been 188 units of the Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 built for road use, it was initially designed as a race car. The “2300” in the car’s name was a reference to the 2.3-liter straight-eight engine that was hidden under its long hood. The 8C was built in several different series’ in its first few years of production, with some (the 188 road cars) serving as luxury vehicles and the rest serving as dedicated race cars. By now, you’ve probably noticed that the model here also sports the “Monza” name. This name was given to the shortened, two-seater GP cars after an early model emerged victorious during the 1931 Italian Grand Prix at Monza.

Throughout the car’s production, it was rather successful on the track, including four consecutive wins at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the consecutive wins at Mille Miglia and Targa Florio, and back-to-back wins at the 24 Hours of Spa. On top of that, the car also led to the development and introduction of the Monoposto Tipo B, which, as you may or may not know, dominated Grand Prix racing with 46 wins between 1932 and 1935.

The model you see here has had several owners, but was raced quite a bit between 1934 and 1948, securing 7th in Class at the Klausen Hillclimb in 1934, 3rd Overall at the Circuito di San Remo in 1947, 2nd Overall and 1st in Class at the Sassi-Superga Hillclimb in 194, and 1st in Class at the Cantania-Etna Hillclimb in 1948, among others. It is Chassis No. 2311218 and was sold new in Italy back in the 1930s. And while it changed hands on a somewhat regular basis, it’s racing DNA kept in on the track even recently as the owner prior to this auction used it to participate in Euro and US. Tours – this isn’t a car you just lock away in a dark garage.

This Monza recently went up for auction at the Gooding & Company Auction during Monterey Car Week, exchanging hands for more than $10 million. It’s only fitting that we do a full review of such an amazing car, so keep reading to take a closer look at it.

Updated 08/24/2017: We added a series of images taken during the 2017 Monterey Car Week.

Note: Official images copyright and courtesy of Gooding & Company. Photos by Brian Henniker.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1933 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza.

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1939 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Lungo Spider

1939 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Lungo Spider

Technology, performance, elegance, distinction – this 2900 has it all

By the late ‘30s, Alfa Romeo was well established as one of Europe’s top performance marques, having enjoyed a huge amount of racing success over the years. From these myriad victories, Alfa developed a series of road cars that have gained legendary status amongst collectors, including the “immortal” 8C 2900. Sporting an advanced, tech-laden chassis, a powerful eight-cylinder engine, and impressive coachwork, RM Sotheby’s calls the 2900 “the ultimate Italian sports car of its generation.”

It would seem as though the collector car market agrees with that assessment – this particular example you see here made for a record-breaking sale at RM Sotheby’s auction in Monterey, trading hands for a jaw-dropping $19.8 million. That price reflects the not only the high desirability of this car, but also its rarity, as this example was the first of its kind offered at public auction this century.

So what makes this thing so remarkable? Read on for the details.

Continue reading to learn more about the Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Lungo Spider.

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Top 5 Cars Sold at Gooding & Company Auction During Monterey Car Week 2016

Top 5 Cars Sold at Gooding & Company Auction During Monterey Car Week 2016

The top 5 accounts for nearly $60 million in auction sales

When it comes to major auctions, it’s pretty common to find various Ferrari models at the top of the list. This year, the auctions taking place during Monterey Car Week were wild as usual. Mecum auctions turned out some amazing vehicles with the top 10 cars pulling in nearly $20 million, but that’s nowhere near the kind of numbers we saw at the Gooding & Company auction. In fact, Gooding’s number for the top five cars was more than double that of Mecum’s top 10 – pretty wild right?

Gooding had a lot of cars listed, and 160 of those lots actually sold. Some of the lower-priced cars include models like a 1954 Alfa Romeo 1900 C Coupe for $412,500, a 1988 Porsche 959 Comfort for $1,320,000, a 1954 Austin-Healey 100/4 BN1 Le Mans for $143,000, a 1928 Morris Oxford for just $49,400, and there was even a 1968 Iso Grifo 7 Litri that sold for $682,000. Okay, so some of those numbers might night be “low” for some of us, but in the grand scheme of things, none of them are much when you consider the most expensive car sold at Gooding this year commanded just of $18 million. More about that later, but I’ll give you a hint: It’s a Ferrari. Shocker, right?

Well, with that said, let’s take a good look at Gooding’s top five from this year at Monterey and talk a little about them. There’s just something about these high-dollar collectibles that really gets the blood flowing, isn’t there?

Keep reading to learn about the top five sellers from Gooding & Company

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1951 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 SS Villa D'Este Coupe

1951 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 SS Villa D’Este Coupe

In the Italian spirit of naming cars after the engines in them, the Alfa Romeo 6C nameplate was applied to a huge range of 6-cylinder cars from 1927 all of the way up to 1954. Some of these were race cars, some were road cars, and a lot of them had very little in common with one another. Even narrowing it down to the 6C 2500 means we’re still talking about 11 different models of just the road-going version. So the significance of the 6C 2500 SS Villa d’Este might sometimes get lost in the shuffle of keeping all of these cars straight.

The Villa d’Este was one of the most expensive cars in the world when it was introduced in very limited quantities starting in 1949. It was one of the last 6C road cars and the last Alfa Romeo to be hand built. It was the most powerful of the non-racing 6C 2500 varieties, and had the shortest and most sporting wheelbase of the 2500s. It is named after a former royal residence on Lake Como in northern Italy. The annual Concorso d’Eleganza held there is one of the most important in the world of collector cars.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1951 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 SS Villa D’Este Coupe.

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1968 Alfa Romeo T33/2 ‘Daytona'

1968 Alfa Romeo T33/2 ‘Daytona’

Though not all auto buffs enjoy watching auto races, there is no disputing that all car buffs love race cars. This becomes even more amplified when you look at classic racecars, as this was back when racecars were really racecars. There were no restrictor plates or standardized engine manufacturing, if one maker could maximize power within the regulations of the sport, it was all good. Nowadays, racecars are, for the most part, mechanical copies of one another with a differing bodies.

So, when a classic race car hits the auction block, affluent car buffs’ ears perk up just a little bit, especially when a legend hits the block. The latest legend to be scheduled for auction through RM Auctions is the 1968 Alfa Romeo T33/2 ‘Daytona’, particularly chassis No. 75033.99. Ed McDonough, an Alfa Romeo expert, stated that chassis No. 75033.99 was a racing car of the 1960s, but the overall record keeping of chassis by Alfa Romeo was poor, so records of all of its races are a little sketchy, as are details of how many chassis were built.

McDonough estimates that 20 chassis were built and that this particular chassis was involved in one of the best showings by Autodelta/Alfa Romeo, as it was a part of the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place finishes at the 1968 500 KM race in Imola, beating Porsche by a wide margin.

The owner of the vehicle claims that the vehicle is in operating condition and is “very reliable.” It has a Dutch and U.K. road registration, and FIA, HTP, and FIVA documents.

This racing legend features a 270-horsepower, 2.0-liter V-8 engine – yes, a 2.0-liter V-8 – and a six-speed gearbox. It also features independent front and rear suspension, and has a 2,250 mm (88.58-inch) wheelbase. So, if you are in the market for a turnkey classic racer, you can snag this one up May 11 or 12, 2012 in Monaco. There is no estimated price, as of yet, but it will certainly crest the $100K mark, easily.

Hit the jump for the official press release and more pictures.

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1962 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Zagato "Coda Tronca"

1962 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Zagato "Coda Tronca"

Alfa Romeo was returning to motor sports when it built the 1962 Giulietta Sprint Zagato. Zagato was a prominent designer and past collaboration with Alfa Romeo had proven fruitful in the Le Mans and Formula 1 circuits. In 1957, Alfa had formed a relationship with Bertone, another famous shop, to develop the Giulietta Sprint Speciale which was a high performance version. That car would become the basis for the new venture with Zagato.

The companies decided to concern themselves with form over function while developing the new GT racer. The plan was to offer the car to customers for their own GT teams and thus it needed to be a strong and reliable performer on the track. Zagato was a master and developing aerodynamically efficient and lightweight machines and the Giulietta Sprint Speciale chassis provided the perfect jumping off point.

Perhaps the reason these cars remain so special today is their overall beauty. The design was focused around performance, but in turn the body became very well recognized and an instant classic for Alfa. Combining the low roofline with the elongated and round body made the car desirable to collectors. The rarity of the “Coda Tronca” version lends to the high selling price at the recent auction that saw chassis 0184 sell for $420,800.

Hit the jump for more details on the 1962 Alfa Romeo Coda Tronca

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Gooding & Company to auction 1995 McLaren F1 and 1933 Alfa Romeo 8C Monza at Pebble Beach

Gooding & Company to auction 1995 McLaren F1 and 1933 Alfa Romeo 8C Monza at Pebble Beach

The Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance will be getting an impressive lineup of vehicles as part of the Pebble Beach Auctions on August 15, 2010. Gooding & Company, the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance’s official auction house, will have a 1947 Italian Championship-winning 1933 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza and a California-registered 1995 McLaren F1 on hand to auction off at the Pebble Beach Equestrian Center at 6pm that evening. Additional vehicles set to be auctioned include a 1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K, 1927 Mercedes-Benz S Boattail Speedster, 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta SEFAC Hot Rod, and a 1956 Maserati 200SI. If those aren’t enough then there is also a Gil Nickel’s 1951 Ferrari 340 America Spider, the 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France, the 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione, and the barn discovery 1933 Duesenberg SJ LWB Convertible.

The 1995 McLaren F1 being auctioned was originally sold to Larry Ellison who is the co-founder and CEO of Oracle. The McLaren is finished in Magnesium Silver, features a black interior, and is in the original factory-delivered form. It is one of the few McLaren supercars that is registered, titled, and certified for use in California. Gooding & Company thinks it can get between $2.5 - $3.5 Million for this supercar, so if you’re interested, be sure to come packing some serious cash.

McLaren’s 2012 MP4-12C is also set to make its North American launch at thePebble Beach Concours d’Elegance on Friday, August 13, 2010 at a private Gooding & Company event with the public viewing taking place on Saturday, August 14th and Sunday, August 15th.

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Foose-built replica of Bertone Alfa Romeo Carabo being sold on eBay

Foose-built replica of Bertone Alfa Romeo Carabo being sold on eBay

Yes, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery and while most don’t live up to the expectations of the original, there are those that come close. Bertone’s Alfa Romeo Carabo is one car that has spawned a lot of imitations over the years, but few have come within a mile of living up to the original creation.

Now, some guy, with the help of none other than Chip Foose’s father, Sam Foose, was able to piece together something that resembles the original Carabo without bastardizing the Bertone work of art. This was done only after his attempts of buying the original Bertone were shut down by the design house. The replica is built on a De Tomaso Pantera platform and comes with a 351 Cleveland V8 that’s hooked to a 5-speed transmission. According to the man selling this ride, the car is "too fast to handle" and it has neither a radio nor any semblance of air-conditioning - unless you consider rolling down the windows and letting the wind come in air-conditioning. Combine these facts and you get a car that looks about as intimidating as it is challenging to drive.

Seeing as the original Carabo was said to cost around $200,000 back in 1972, we don’t know how much the seller is willing to accept as a purchase price. He did say that if anyone’s interested they should give him a call at 561-676-5723.

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