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1967 - 1969 Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale

1967 - 1969 Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale

One of the fastest and most expensive in its day, and still one of the most beautiful ever made

Fast, expensive, rare, and achingly gorgeous - these are the words that describe the Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale. Produced in very limited quantities between November of 1967 and March of 1969, the Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale is a sports car based on the open-top Alfa Romeo Tipo 33 Sports prototype racer, promising all the mechanical good stuff of a track-born competitor, but packaged with the freedom and relative comfort of a street-legal machine. Not to be confused with the four-door Alfa Romeo 33 sedan built between 1983 and 1995, the 33 Stradale follows the time-honored Italian tradition of bringing competition technology to the street, and suffice to say, the end result is epic from every single angle.

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1933 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza

1933 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza

A prime example of a very successful race car

While there may have been 188 units of the Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 built for road use, it was initially designed as a race car. The “2300” in the car’s name was a reference to the 2.3-liter straight-eight engine that was hidden under its long hood. The 8C was built in several different series’ in its first few years of production, with some (the 188 road cars) serving as luxury vehicles and the rest serving as dedicated race cars. By now, you’ve probably noticed that the model here also sports the “Monza” name. This name was given to the shortened, two-seater GP cars after an early model emerged victorious during the 1931 Italian Grand Prix at Monza.

Throughout the car’s production, it was rather successful on the track, including four consecutive wins at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the consecutive wins at Mille Miglia and Targa Florio, and back-to-back wins at the 24 Hours of Spa. On top of that, the car also led to the development and introduction of the Monoposto Tipo B, which, as you may or may not know, dominated Grand Prix racing with 46 wins between 1932 and 1935.

The model you see here has had several owners, but was raced quite a bit between 1934 and 1948, securing 7th in Class at the Klausen Hillclimb in 1934, 3rd Overall at the Circuito di San Remo in 1947, 2nd Overall and 1st in Class at the Sassi-Superga Hillclimb in 194, and 1st in Class at the Cantania-Etna Hillclimb in 1948, among others. It is Chassis No. 2311218 and was sold new in Italy back in the 1930s. And while it changed hands on a somewhat regular basis, it’s racing DNA kept in on the track even recently as the owner prior to this auction used it to participate in Euro and US. Tours – this isn’t a car you just lock away in a dark garage.

This Monza recently went up for auction at the Gooding & Company Auction during Monterey Car Week, exchanging hands for more than $10 million. It’s only fitting that we do a full review of such an amazing car, so keep reading to take a closer look at it.

Updated 08/24/2017: We added a series of images taken during the 2017 Monterey Car Week.

Note: Official images copyright and courtesy of Gooding & Company. Photos by Brian Henniker.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1933 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza.

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Top 5 Cars Sold at Gooding & Company Auction During Monterey Car Week 2016

Top 5 Cars Sold at Gooding & Company Auction During Monterey Car Week 2016

The top 5 accounts for nearly $60 million in auction sales

When it comes to major auctions, it’s pretty common to find various Ferrari models at the top of the list. This year, the auctions taking place during Monterey Car Week were wild as usual. Mecum auctions turned out some amazing vehicles with the top 10 cars pulling in nearly $20 million, but that’s nowhere near the kind of numbers we saw at the Gooding & Company auction. In fact, Gooding’s number for the top five cars was more than double that of Mecum’s top 10 – pretty wild right?

Gooding had a lot of cars listed, and 160 of those lots actually sold. Some of the lower-priced cars include models like a 1954 Alfa Romeo 1900 C Coupe for $412,500, a 1988 Porsche 959 Comfort for $1,320,000, a 1954 Austin-Healey 100/4 BN1 Le Mans for $143,000, a 1928 Morris Oxford for just $49,400, and there was even a 1968 Iso Grifo 7 Litri that sold for $682,000. Okay, so some of those numbers might night be “low” for some of us, but in the grand scheme of things, none of them are much when you consider the most expensive car sold at Gooding this year commanded just of $18 million. More about that later, but I’ll give you a hint: It’s a Ferrari. Shocker, right?

Well, with that said, let’s take a good look at Gooding’s top five from this year at Monterey and talk a little about them. There’s just something about these high-dollar collectibles that really gets the blood flowing, isn’t there?

Keep reading to learn about the top five sellers from Gooding & Company

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Pur Sang's Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza Is As Close To The Original As It Can Get: Video

Pur Sang’s Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza Is As Close To The Original As It Can Get: Video

It’s a scene-stealing, close-to-accurate version of the original 8C Monza

Those who know of Pur Sang Argentina will attest that the company that built its brand on recreating the Bugatti Type 35 using period technology is as good as it gets for anybody looking to own near-perfect versions of classic race cars. The company has since expanded past building the Type 35, and as this episode of Tuned will show you, Pur Sang has proven to be just as adept at building an immaculate production of the 1931 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza.

Tuned host Matt Farah had the pleasure of meeting the commercial director of Pur Sang, John Bothwell, who happens to own a Pur Sang-built 8C. As Farah notes, this 8C may not be an original – those are rarely driven on the street because they can fetch a price of eight figures – but it’s also insulting to call it a replica. That’s because Pur Sang builds these cars with the same materials that were used on the originals, right down to the tiniest of details. Farah put it best when he said “it would take a nerd of epic proportions to spot differences from the original.”

And as awesome as it looks, the Pur Sang 8C’s true calling card is its drivability. Farah and Bothwell took it down for a test run and while it did prove to be a little complicated to get the hang of, even for a driver of Farah’s experience, the sound of the 2.3-liter supercharged straight-eight engine made the whole experience worth it. It is, in almost every way imaginable, as close to the original one as it could get.

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1951 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 SS Villa D'Este Coupe

1951 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 SS Villa D’Este Coupe

In the Italian spirit of naming cars after the engines in them, the Alfa Romeo 6C nameplate was applied to a huge range of 6-cylinder cars from 1927 all of the way up to 1954. Some of these were race cars, some were road cars, and a lot of them had very little in common with one another. Even narrowing it down to the 6C 2500 means we’re still talking about 11 different models of just the road-going version. So the significance of the 6C 2500 SS Villa d’Este might sometimes get lost in the shuffle of keeping all of these cars straight.

The Villa d’Este was one of the most expensive cars in the world when it was introduced in very limited quantities starting in 1949. It was one of the last 6C road cars and the last Alfa Romeo to be hand built. It was the most powerful of the non-racing 6C 2500 varieties, and had the shortest and most sporting wheelbase of the 2500s. It is named after a former royal residence on Lake Como in northern Italy. The annual Concorso d’Eleganza held there is one of the most important in the world of collector cars.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1951 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 SS Villa D’Este Coupe.

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Wide Open Spirit - A Look Into The Soul Of One Mans Alfa Romeo Spider: Video

Wide Open Spirit - A Look Into The Soul Of One Mans Alfa Romeo Spider: Video

The owner of a well-maintained Alfa Romeo talks about his love and passion for his 1969 Alfa Romeo Spider

When it comes to talking about the best car to take to the open road, there is a long list of cars that comfortably fit the bill. Fortunately, we don’t have to go over that list today – it really can turn into a long drawn out debate. Instead, we’re here to look at just one car: the 1969 Alfa Romeo Duetto Spider.

We could probably talk all day about Duetto spider. It is a classic, with an exceptional but simple design, and elegance in a way only those who’ve had the pleasure of driving one can actually appreciate. Fortunately, in this video just released by Petrolicious, Keith Helmetag – the owner of a very well maintained, 1969 Alfa Romeo Spider – talks about his passion for the car, what it’s like driving it, simple modifications he’s made, and even why he chose that beautiful green color the car is finished in.

I won’t ruin the video for you, but I will say that it is definitely worth watching. In the six minutes of video, there are various clips of in-car footage and footage of the car cruising down some winding back roads. To be quite honest, I’m a little jealous of Mr. Helmetag. I wouldn’t mind owning a fine Alfa Romeo like that one day – especially one that has been so well maintained.

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1932 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Zagato Named Best Of Concorso d'Eleganza Villa d'Este

1932 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Zagato Named Best Of Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este

The Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este has got to be one of the coolest and most unique car events in the world right now. Built 1568, the Villa d’Este Hotel on the shores of Lake Como in Italy is the backdrop for this extraordinary and intimate event, which welcomes classic cars and motorcycles, as well as modern concepts and race cars. Among others, 2015 brought out the BMW 3.0 CSL Hommage concept, a 1961 Ferrari GT SWB California Spider that sold at auction for over $11 million, and Cameron Glickenhaus’s SCG003, fresh off its finish at the Nürburgring 24 hour race.

But, the best in show award went to this pristine 1932 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Spider, owned by American collector David Sydorick and wearing coach-built bodywork from Zagato. The 8C was Enzo Ferrari’s race car of choice before he started building his own several years later. With a 2.3-liter inline-eight cylinder engine, Alfa Romeo never intended the 8C 2300 to be a road car, but eventually decided to sell it as a rolling chassis due to high demand. Wealthy owners then took their 8C chassis to Carrozzerrias (coach builders), like Pininfarina, Touring, or, in this case, Zagato, to have them fitted with bodies of their choosing.

Continue reading for the full story.

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1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale

1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale

The Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale is a rolling piece of Italian car design history. Unlike the sportier and more popular 105 and 115 GTs, GTVs and GTAs that replaced it, it’s more of a pocket-sized grand touring car than it is a sport coupe. The product of Carrozzeria Bertone, its mid-century, space-age shape was the result of lessons learned from the super-aerodynamic Alfa Romeo-Bertone Berlinetta Aerodinamica Technica design studies.

Almost visually identical to the Giulietta Sprint Speciale, the Giulia was powered by a slightly larger 1.6-liter engine. The Giulietta was originally conceived to go up against Zagato’s Alfa Romeo Giulietta SZ, which shared similar underpinnings, but the Bertone car’s steel bodywork was too cumbersome to bring the fight to the alloy-bodied Zagato. As a result, the Giulietta’s shortcomings as a sports car precipitated its transformation into the Giulia grand tourer.

Collectors have traditionally ignored the Sprint Speciale twins in favor of the faster and lighter 105s and 115s, but that’s changing quickly as they are recognized, the Giulia in particular, for their jaw dropping looks and capabilities as effortless, back-road touring cars.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale.

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Video: A Look Back at the Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale

Video: A Look Back at the Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale

There are people in this world who like cars, but then you occasionally run into someone who lives and breaths the art of the automobile. Their veins are full of gasoline and their minds run wild with the dreams of racing victories, back road bombings, and the perfect sunset cruise. Conrad Stevenson is definitely the latter. He built a 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale essentially from scratch, and he uses it to race in the brutally-fast and grueling Carrera Panamericana rally race.

Stevenson started with little more than a roof panel for the machine. Since then, he has built the car by hand using classic techniques and tools to create a patchwork of metal that looks beyond striking. Because of his build methods, the machine is not a true authentic ’65 car, but in his words, “I’m not presenting this car to Pebble Beach.”

Stevenson has run the Panamericana race previously in various machines with his friends, but last year was the first time he competed in the Alfa Romeo. Apparently, he knows how to build a solid race car; not only did he finish the race, but he finished 21st overall.

Just like all Petrolicious videos, this eight-minute film is full of gorgeous shots, thoughtful insight form the car’s owner and plenty of glorious Italian noise. Hit that “play” button and spend the next few minutes in bliss. It makes for a great end to a Sunday afternoon, and the perfect way to get ready for the upcoming week.

Don’t get mad at me if you want to build a race car and run across Mexico with it, though. Blame Petrolicious.

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Video: Alfa Romeo Giulia Spider Veloce 1600 Tribute

Video: Alfa Romeo Giulia Spider Veloce 1600 Tribute

In 1962, Alfa Romeo launched the Giulia sports sedan along the coupe and Spider versions, which were rebadged and updated versions of earlier Giulietta models (series 101). These models had their old 1.3-liter engines replaced by new, more powerful 1.6-liter engines, hence the "1600" in the name.

The Spider version also had a more powerful version called "Veloce" (Italian for "fast"), and this is exactly the car owned by Mr. Casey Annis and the one reviewed in this video.

Casey Annis is a publisher and editor at Vintage Racecar, so no doubt he knows one think or two about classic cars. No wonder why he speaks so great about this classic Giulia Spider Veloce 1600!

The review was shot right next to the California’s coast,p which if you ask us, is the perfect place for such a great car. If you are a fan of classic Alfa Romeo models, then this is definitively a video you will not want to miss!

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1994 Alfa Romeo Zagato Roadster by Vilner

1994 Alfa Romeo Zagato Roadster by Vilner

Bulgarian tuner, Vilner, is one of those aftermarket companies that rarely follows conformity. That’s a good thing because, in terms of being unique and against the grain, it’s one of the best in the business.

So it’s not surprising that its latest program is for a sports car that’s about 20 years old: the legendary Alfa Romeo Zagato Roadster.

The two-seat convertible was produced from 1992 until 1994 with only 284 of the 350 planned units being realized. So yeah, when it comes to Alfa Romeo exclusivity, the Zagato Roadster is head and shoulders above the rest.

In order to restore the limited edition sports car back to its shiny opulence, Vilner fully serviced the sports car, cleaning and restoring the car’s body, chassis and engine. The body of the Zagato Roadster was first dressed in a red matte finish, a shade that pays homage to Alfa Romeo’s sister brand, Ferrari.

From there, Vilner replaced all the seals that needed replacing while also creating a new hood for the sports car. Equally important was the work the Bulgarian tuner did on the sports car’s interior, rebuilding and equipping the cabin with a new dashboard, center console, steering wheel, door panels and floor mats. Even the seats were restored to their former glory, which goes to show the lengths Vilner went to bring back the iconic sports car.

Under its hood, the Zagato Roadster comes powered with a restored stock 3.0-liter V-6 engine that produces 210 horsepower at 6,200 rpm and 181 pound-feet of torque at 4,500 rpm.

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Alfa Romeo Cleans up at Concorso d'Eleganza

Alfa Romeo Cleans up at Concorso d’Eleganza

Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este 2012 is in the books and one automaker, which was surprisingly not BMW – the sponsor of the event – cleaned up house by taking home four awards, including the most prestigious award. The winner of three of the four awards is a 1933 6C 1750 GS, an ultra-rare specimen from Alfa Romeo. The main prize that this beauty won was the “Concorso d’Eleganza Best of Show” by vote of the jury, which is the top award. In addition to this top prize, the Alfa Romeo also took home the “Coppa d’Oro Villa d’Este” and the “Tropheo BMW Group Italia” by public vote.

The 6C 1750 GS was part of a series of road and race cars that Alfa Romeo manufactured from 1929 through 1933. While all of the models have their own special place in automotive history, this 1933 6C 1750 GS is especially rare. This model was designed by Figoni coach builders and boasts a 1,752 cc in-line six-cylinder engine, which cranked out a then-impressive 102 horsepower at 5,000 rpm and 126 pound-feet of torque at 2,000 rpm.

In addition to the 6C taking home three awards, Alfa Romeo took home yet another award. This prize was handed to the 4C, as it won the “Design Award for Concept Cars & Prototypes,” which is voted on by the public. This sleek and sexy sports car takes its styling cues from the 8C Competizione and boasts a 200-horsepower 1,750 cc turbocharged four-cylinder engine. An official at the event was quoted “…the 4C represents the essence a of true sports soul in accordance with the brand’s values: performance, Italian style and technical excellence for maximum driving pleasure in complete safety.” And we certainly agree with that interpretation.

In closing, we tip our hats to Alfa Romeo and impatiently await the release of the 4C’s debut in the U.S. in 2013.

Click past the jump to read the full press release.

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1968 Alfa Romeo T33/2 ‘Daytona'

1968 Alfa Romeo T33/2 ‘Daytona’

Though not all auto buffs enjoy watching auto races, there is no disputing that all car buffs love race cars. This becomes even more amplified when you look at classic racecars, as this was back when racecars were really racecars. There were no restrictor plates or standardized engine manufacturing, if one maker could maximize power within the regulations of the sport, it was all good. Nowadays, racecars are, for the most part, mechanical copies of one another with a differing bodies.

So, when a classic race car hits the auction block, affluent car buffs’ ears perk up just a little bit, especially when a legend hits the block. The latest legend to be scheduled for auction through RM Auctions is the 1968 Alfa Romeo T33/2 ‘Daytona’, particularly chassis No. 75033.99. Ed McDonough, an Alfa Romeo expert, stated that chassis No. 75033.99 was a racing car of the 1960s, but the overall record keeping of chassis by Alfa Romeo was poor, so records of all of its races are a little sketchy, as are details of how many chassis were built.

McDonough estimates that 20 chassis were built and that this particular chassis was involved in one of the best showings by Autodelta/Alfa Romeo, as it was a part of the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place finishes at the 1968 500 KM race in Imola, beating Porsche by a wide margin.

The owner of the vehicle claims that the vehicle is in operating condition and is “very reliable.” It has a Dutch and U.K. road registration, and FIA, HTP, and FIVA documents.

This racing legend features a 270-horsepower, 2.0-liter V-8 engine – yes, a 2.0-liter V-8 – and a six-speed gearbox. It also features independent front and rear suspension, and has a 2,250 mm (88.58-inch) wheelbase. So, if you are in the market for a turnkey classic racer, you can snag this one up May 11 or 12, 2012 in Monaco. There is no estimated price, as of yet, but it will certainly crest the $100K mark, easily.

Hit the jump for the official press release and more pictures.

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1962 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Zagato "Coda Tronca"

1962 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Zagato "Coda Tronca"

Alfa Romeo was returning to motor sports when it built the 1962 Giulietta Sprint Zagato. Zagato was a prominent designer and past collaboration with Alfa Romeo had proven fruitful in the Le Mans and Formula 1 circuits. In 1957, Alfa had formed a relationship with Bertone, another famous shop, to develop the Giulietta Sprint Speciale which was a high performance version. That car would become the basis for the new venture with Zagato.

The companies decided to concern themselves with form over function while developing the new GT racer. The plan was to offer the car to customers for their own GT teams and thus it needed to be a strong and reliable performer on the track. Zagato was a master and developing aerodynamically efficient and lightweight machines and the Giulietta Sprint Speciale chassis provided the perfect jumping off point.

Perhaps the reason these cars remain so special today is their overall beauty. The design was focused around performance, but in turn the body became very well recognized and an instant classic for Alfa. Combining the low roofline with the elongated and round body made the car desirable to collectors. The rarity of the “Coda Tronca” version lends to the high selling price at the recent auction that saw chassis 0184 sell for $420,800.

Hit the jump for more details on the 1962 Alfa Romeo Coda Tronca

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Alfa Giulia GTAm - best Alfa Romeo ever

Alfa Giulia GTAm - best Alfa Romeo ever

During a long history of 100 years, Alfa Romeo has created more than 70 models, and what better to draw a little attention to your brand than creating a poll among British Alfa Romeo fans to determine which one of those 70 models is the best. And the winner is...the Alfa Romeo GTAm by a hair of less than 1% over the 8C Competizione.

The Alfa Giulia GTAm was a two door coupe produced y Alfa Romeo in 1970-1971. It was powered by a 2.0 L straight-4 engine producing up to 240hp. It was derived from the standard 1750 GT Veloce production model with a SPICA mechanical fuel injection system. A highlight of the GTAm’s career was winning the 1970 European Touring Car Championship in the hands of Dutchman Toine Hezemans. It beat out the competition in this poll with a 20.4% vote. The 8C Competizione followed the GTAm with a 19.8%.

"The Giulia GTAm was a great Alfa and a deserved winner. It’s really interesting to see how people voted in the poll. We all have our favorites which is testament to the fantastic cars Alfa Romeo has produced over the past century." For those of you interested, the latest GTAm is on sale in dealerships across the UK.

Press release after the jump.

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Rare Alfa Romeo 1933 Monza to Compete in 2007 Mille Miglia

Rare Alfa Romeo 1933 Monza to Compete in 2007 Mille Miglia

A legendary Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Monza sports car will hit the circuit of the Mille Miglia today in a return to European competition.
The Alfa Monza, which is owned by the Fratelli Auriana team, is believed to be the model raced by Tazio Nuvolari in his winning bid in the 1932 Monaco Grand Prix. It later was entered in the 1933 Monaco Grand Prix and French Grand Prix and, in 1934, placed second in the British Empire Trophy Race, when it was driven by Charles Brackenbury. The Fratelli (...)

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The most Beautiful Cars in the world

The most Beautiful Cars in the world

Here is what people consider to be the most beautiful car in the world. Some of them we agree, some we don’t. But the point is that they are master pieces in the automotive industry.
Among the highlights are the astonishingly gorgeous 1938 Bugatti Type 57SC Atlantic Coupe, arguably the most impressive car in the collection, and the Art Nouveau, somewhat predatory, 1930 Mercedes-Benz "Count Trossi" SSK, with its distinctive aerodynamic pontoon fenders, long and low bonnet and (...)

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