A unique cabriolet with yacht-inspired upholstery and paint

The second-generation V12 Vanquish was introduced in 2012, 11 years after Aston Martin introduced the nameplate as a replacement for the aging Virage. Although it borrows the same styling cues made popular by the DB9, the Vanquish sports more aggressive features inspired by the One-77 supercar, a more stylish interior, and a powerful 5.9-liter V-12 engine. Scheduled to be replaced in 2018 by a an updated model using the new DB11 platform, the Vanquish remains a popular choice on the luxury grand tourer market and it is still being used as a base for numerous limited-edition models.

Following the unveiling of the Vanquish Zagato, in both coupe and convertible forms, at the 2016 Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este, Aston Martin showcased yet another unique Vanquish Volante created by the Q division. What makes this latest cabriolet more interesting than its siblings is that it is based on the AM37 Powerboat, a 37-foot vessel built by Quintessence Yachts. Luxurious and well-appointed, the AM37 served as inspiration for the grand tourer, which borrowed some of its exterior paint and the two-tone upholstery.

Much like most vehicles designed by the Q division, this Vanquish Volante is unique, with just one lucky owner getting bragging rights to it. Find out what makes it special in our review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Aston Martin Vanquish Volante Inspired By AM37 Powerboat.

What makes the Aston Martin Vanquish Volante Inspired By AM37 Powerboat special

Aston Martin had nothing to say about the drop-top grand tourer, but the pictures the automaker shared on social media speak for themselves. Like most Q-made bespoke cars, the Vanquish’s exterior is all about a custom paint job. But, even though it is indeed inspired by the AM37 yacht, it’s not the boat’s main color, which is finished in bright shade of blue. Instead, Aston Martin used the very light purple-like hue seen on the upper side of the yacht as the car’s main color. The hue is indeed spectacular, but the bright-blue, maybe with purple accents, would’ve made the link between the Vanquish Volante and the AM37 even stronger.

The similarities between the grand tourer and the boat continue inside, where Aston Martin’s Q division fitted an upholstery inspired by the AM37’s. The colors are identical, with the seats having white leather on the front and seating sections and brown sides. Brown was also used on the dashboard, steering wheel, door panels, and center tunnel, going all the way back to where the soft-top retracts under the deck lid. The big slab of wood on the center stack is also similar to the yacht’s as far as texture goes, even though it’s in a much darker color. Overall, it’s a cool tribute to Aston Martin’s tremendous AM37 boat and a unique vehicle that won’t go unnoticed on public roads.

Like most Q-made bespoke cars, the Vanquish's exterior is all about a custom paint job. The similarities between the grand tourer and the boat continue inside, where Aston Martin's Q division fitted an upholstery inspired by the AM37's.

Since Aston Martin didn’t release drivetrain information, it’s safe to assume that this custom cabriolet gets its juice from the same engine found in the standard model. The unit in question is a 5.9-liter V-12 that sends 568 horsepower and 465 pound-feet of torque to the rear wheels through an eight-speed automatic transmission. Charging from 0 to 60 mph takes only 3.8 seconds, while top speed is reached at 197 mph. The British firm uprated the said V-12 to 591 horses for the limited-edition Vanquish Zagato Volante, but it seems it’s not yet keen on offering it on non Zagato versions. That’s a shame really, as this custom deserves a special drivetrain.

There’s no word as to how much this unique car costs, but it’s safe to assume that its owner paid way more than the standard $300,000 sticker. The bespoke paint and the new upholstery likely upped the price to around $350,000.

Read our full review on the Aston Martin Vanquish Volante here.

Source: Aston Martin

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